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Britains most notorious traitor and his links to the modern anarchist movements.

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posted on Jul, 4 2011 @ 05:04 PM
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Originally posted by justwokeup
reply to post by dethduck
 


To be honest nobody much cares who Guy was.

In Scotland at least its just an excuse to have a bonfire and light off a large amount of fireworks. Great for kids.



That goes for us English too, most don't care who he was or why we do it, just set off the fireworks or go to a public gathering where the local council puts on a fireworks display with burger vans, hot dog vendors, candy floss (cotton candy to our US brethren), toffee apples and carnival rides.

Nothing like the over commercialisation of a historic moment that shaped our national culture huh?




posted on Jul, 4 2011 @ 05:06 PM
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Originally posted by curious7

Originally posted by justwokeup
reply to post by dethduck
 


To be honest nobody much cares who Guy was.

In Scotland at least its just an excuse to have a bonfire and light off a large amount of fireworks. Great for kids.



That goes for us English too, most don't care who he was or why we do it, just set off the fireworks or go to a public gathering where the local council puts on a fireworks display with burger vans, hot dog vendors, candy floss (cotton candy to our US brethren), toffee apples and carnival rides.

Nothing like the over commercialisation of a historic moment that shaped our national culture huh?
So, essentially, it's just become a meaningless holiday?



posted on Jul, 4 2011 @ 05:25 PM
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I am sure the ritual and celebration has a deep message for the people of England as to what will happen if they do not stay in their place and do as their government tells them. And every year they are reminded of their servitude.



posted on Jul, 4 2011 @ 05:33 PM
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Originally posted by dethduck

Originally posted by curious7

Originally posted by justwokeup
reply to post by dethduck
 


To be honest nobody much cares who Guy was.

In Scotland at least its just an excuse to have a bonfire and light off a large amount of fireworks. Great for kids.



That goes for us English too, most don't care who he was or why we do it, just set off the fireworks or go to a public gathering where the local council puts on a fireworks display with burger vans, hot dog vendors, candy floss (cotton candy to our US brethren), toffee apples and carnival rides.

Nothing like the over commercialisation of a historic moment that shaped our national culture huh?
So, essentially, it's just become a meaningless holiday?


Meaningless holiday......yep but without the holiday aspect (ie, no day off work to celebrate)

Then again, most of our national holidays are pretty meaningless over here, the root cause of why they happen has become lost and barely anyone cares about the why or how, it's just sort of a tradition that people do without thinking about.



posted on Jul, 4 2011 @ 05:44 PM
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everyone in the uk should know a lil about bonfirenight

or before Guy faulks green man

www.theinsider.org...www.theinsider.org...



posted on Jul, 4 2011 @ 05:46 PM
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It's not a holiday par se.. It's more of a tradition than anything.. This event has been celebrated for hundreds of years over here.



posted on Jul, 4 2011 @ 06:46 PM
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I would have loved to learn about this when I was in school, but our history lessons were a love-in for ancient Egyptians and their respective gods. My parents were good to me though, and bought me enough on this topic that I know who he was and why we burn effigies and light bonfires. I don't think a lot of kids these days can appreciate how morbid this country and others were a few hundred years ago. And hey, in some respects, still are morbid.

It is true though, that this is another commercially driven excuse to part people with their money, which is why I find it ironic that modern anarchists have adopted his "face" to push their agendas. Maybe it's the moustache.


Now if only people would stop lighting the fireworks that are held in place by the cheeks of their rear ends!



posted on Jul, 5 2011 @ 03:46 AM
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Originally posted by dethduck
I'm curious, why do they still celebrate the 5th?
What are they celebrating? The preservation of the monarchy and Church of England?
Or is it just become so traditional that it's just a thing you do.


It's actually a tradition that's alot older than the gunpowder plot, it's a pagan tradition.


The practice of burning the "Guy" on the bonfire on November 5th did not begin when Guy Fawkes was killed. It was the continuation of an ancient pagan winter festival of human sacrifice, in which human effigies were burned[2]. All that has changed in this archaic ritual since 1605 is the identity of the sacrificial victim. The pyrotechnic tradition of fireworks has long been associated with the pagan tradition of the Green Man.


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posted on Jul, 5 2011 @ 03:48 AM
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Originally posted by ashwhy

everyone in the uk should know a lil about bonfirenight

or before Guy faulks green man

www.theinsider.org...www.theinsider.org...


Should have read the whole thread before i posted my last reply.

Well, at least I'm backing up your post



posted on Jul, 5 2011 @ 04:18 AM
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reply to post by curious7
 


When I was a kid we'd spend weeks scouring the local area trying to find anything that would burn on our bonfire.
We set guards on our bonfire and would try to find other people's bonfire's and 'scrag' them.
Then on 'bommy' night we'd light our bonfire, burn our Guy and have roast tatties etc, when we got older we'd also have a couple of cans or some Olde English.
Great fun.

Even though I was raised a Catholic within a Protestant community we were all completely unaware of the traditions roots and that it celebrated Catholic repression; we didn't give a toss, we just had a great time.

Then I got older and retired to the pub and sat by and watched as the whole thing became sanitised on alleged Health & Safety grounds and became commercialised and managed with organised displays etc.

The UK is worse for the demise of this great tradition.

As for the V for Vendetta connection; anyone who has watched the film and knows about The Gunpowder Plot should get it.
Personally I think that anything that raises awareness about the failings of our Parliamentary and so-called Democratic system is fine by me.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 12:11 PM
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Really cool thread mrlondon, S&F.

I love the story of Guy Fawlkes, reminds me of being a child, and your right it is weird how we burn an effigy.



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 08:25 AM
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I think today...a most fitting day..to remember his passing.

Guy Fawkes died on this day..31 January...let this day be another day to remember Guy Fawkes.

Traitor...or...Revolutionary.

Cheated the executioner by jumping from the Gallows thus breaking his neck, an instant death which saved him from the agony of being quartered while still alive from the partial hanging, although he had been drawn (dragged) to the Gallows.

Or to put it in the words of the Attorney General Sir Edward Coke...

The condemned will be drawn backwards to his death, by a horse, his . near the ground.
At the Gallows to be put to death halfway between Heaven and Earth as unworthy of both.
Their genitals removed and burnt before their eyes.
Their bowels and heart removed and presented to their senses.
Decapitated and dismembered to the four corners of the Kingdom where they may become prey for the fowls of the air.

I guess in some ways it's fair to say things have improved a bit since those days.

At least for those of us lucky enough to live in the parts of the world free from such barbarity.

Cosmic..



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 01:31 PM
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reply to post by Misterlondon
 


What is anarchism?

What does that mean to you?



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