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Electric watches in Sicily (Italy) running all 20 minutes faster

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posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 06:26 AM
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Originally posted by prof7
These clocks take their time base from the (usually very precise) 50Hz frequency of the European power grid. Usually the grid is synchronized all across Europe and exactly 50Hz are guaranteed everywhere but when some small part of the power grid gets decoupled from the rest of the grid and is running freely for a while then the frequency in this part of the grid might drift a little bit until it is recoupled again with the rest.

There is no mystery here, this is just a technical failure in the power grid. No mystery "impulses" in the grid, this is pure bull#. Just a normal frequency drift as it happens from time to time, every electrical engineer can explain this. All one needs to know is how the grid woks and how these clocks work. Both are neither secret nor mysteries.

Clocks that base their time on crystal oscillators (wrist watches or other kinds of battery driven or mechanical watches that are not connected to the grid) are not affected.
edit on 9-6-2011 by prof7 because: (no reason given)


Microwaves are hooked up to some kind of frequency? Even when you manually entered the time? Im just trying to understand this. I didnt know wristwatches and alarm clocks and Microwaves could receive a frequency. Then is there a way to hack into this frequency and change the time or even start up a microwave out of nowhere? I'm just trying to understand what these everyday devices are capable of... Seems very strange to me. Also unreliable if these happen from time to time and they don't even warn you about it. I wonder how many people have lost their job because of these things because of being late.




posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 06:29 AM
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About 3 to 4 weeks ago, for about 2 weeks, all of my clocks were different.
The strangest one-on my main laptop- skipped about 15 hours ahead on several occassions. I thought I was being hacked at first.
My car clock was 3 minutes off, my cell was 5 minutes off, my alarm clock changed about 5 minutes. The microwave clock was a few minutes off.

The only clock that seems to have not changed at all is on my Comcast digital box converter.

It really had me scratching my head.

2 of my other computers were only a few minutes off also, so I was able to determine that I had not been infiltrated through my wireless connection, with my other laptop that was 15 hours off, several times...

Everything is back to normal now, after resetting them a few to several times.
Strange...

Glad I'm not alone though...



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 06:31 AM
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reply to post by prof7
 



Two clocks initially ticking at exactly the same rate will change when one is taken to the top of a mountain. Someone in the valley will see the mountain clock to be running fast, while someone on the mountain will see the valley clock to be running slow.

This is due to the valley clock being nearer the centre of the Earth, so the gravitational potential is stronger. A clock will speed up by 1.09 parts in 1013 for every kilometre above sea level, this works out at about 9.43 nanoseconds per day.


Or Sicily just elevated........hmmmm....let me see....9.43 nanosec/km, 20 minutes time difference, comes to (20 min/9,4 nanosec= 1200.000.000.000/9.4 = 120.000.000.000 km!!

I guess somebody would have noticed this.......forget that theory.


Peace



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 06:34 AM
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for wristwatches, i can tell that when the battery is nearing the end of its life, it can give strange readings: it happens often in cardios and cyclecomputers...



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 06:35 AM
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Originally posted by prof7

But if it is really happening, it's something very weird and highly significant.


No, its normal. Read my post above, I just explained it. All these clocks base their time on the same timebase and if the timebase is drifting then they are all wrong the same amount of time.
Well can you please elaborate a little bit. How is the "timebase" drifting and what is causing it? The electrical grid? How does exactly does that work?



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 06:37 AM
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Originally posted by ZackMorris
Microwaves are hooked up to some kind of frequency? Even when you manually entered the time?


They are counting the oscillations of the 50Hz power supply. they contain a digital counter that counts from 0 to 49 and then resets to 0 again. Each time it has reset to 0 it increases the display time by one second. Since the power supply is guaranteed to make exactly 50.000 oscillations per second this will run very precise.

But if they cut of the entire island from the continent and their power plant is running freely it might drift to maybe 40 per second or maybe 60 per second or even worse or everywhere in between. Then all such clocks will be wrong the same amount.

Try the following experiment. Get a cheap diesel generator, connect a few digital clocks (alarm clock, microwave and similar) to its power outlet and let it run for a few hours. I guarantee they will all go wrong after a while and all the same amount. This is what is happening there, only on a much larger scale.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 06:38 AM
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reply to post by purplemer
 


Very interesting point , imagine the implications for computers and timing within electronics
Another death blow to modern technology ?



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 06:40 AM
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Originally posted by metaldave
Glad I'm not alone though...


no bro, u r not alone

I imagine for the most part, that
most of the people who notice this
type phenom just shrug it off as being
unexplained. no biggie to them.
but if they knew it was happening
in mass they may have a different
opinion.

At one point after my 2nd occurrence
of the phenom, I had suspicions that
the LHC was responsible. But I had no
proof.
edit on 6/9/2011 by boondock-saint because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 06:45 AM
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Originally posted by Isolation
reply to post by purplemer
 


Very interesting point , imagine the implications for computers and timing within electronics
Another death blow to modern technology ?


Computer clocks are usually driven by their own crystal oscillators. they work autonomous (and when online they will additionally synchronize with a time server on the net). Most really important clocks will not use the simple count-the-grid-frequency method. This method is cheap and effective for many applications but not for important clocks and important applications. These clocks must be able to run without grid and don't rely on it.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 06:48 AM
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Ok, just have a question here. With the sun having the cornial explosion yesterday, is it possible the electrical items are 'feeling' the electrical pulse that comes with such activity? Just a thought. I did read the other article, however what are the chances that the ghost in the machine is awake to the activity hitting us from out there?

Thanks,
Ainge

www.spaceweather.com...



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 06:53 AM
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reply to post by Ainge
 





Ok, just have a question here. With the sun having the cornial explosion yesterday, is it possible the electrical items are 'feeling' the electrical pulse that comes with such activity?


I don't really think so, clocks are faster since more than a week ago or earlier



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 06:54 AM
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Originally posted by Ainge
electrical items are 'feeling'


No. These items have no feelings.

They have counters to count the AC oscillations and increase the time by one second every 50 oscillations.

If the entire island was running on 60Hz now instead of 50 for some time because they cut off all synchronization because they are fixing the broken cable and their power plant is drifting freely without any sync then this is the expected behavior.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 06:55 AM
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It's normal. It's just the rest of the world trying to keep up with Australia.

I mean we are first into tomorrow than you are, and you guys are the last to leave yesterday. So....

No really, dunno. It's always anecdotal.

When it becomes noted, I will really think about it.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 06:58 AM
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reply to post by Hundroid
 


Quartz watches have a crystal that vibrates somewhere in the area of 40KHz if I'm not mistaken.
From there the watches circuitry can calculate the proper timing of the watch. That's why quartz watches can be so accurate within a few seconds a month.

Quartz watches are affected by temperature. That's why a thermo compensator is added to some watches for even more accuracy. Giving an accuracy of several seconds per year.

For a watch to be affected so that it's off by 20 mins? I don't know what would do that. Something other than just temperature would have to be affecting the watches crystal and circuitry.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 07:02 AM
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Originally posted by grey580
For a watch to be affected so that it's off by 20 mins? I don't know what would do that. Something other than just temperature would have to be affecting the watches crystal and circuitry.


Did you even read the thread? These clocks are not crystal clocks, they are cheap electrical clocks that use the European grid frequency of 50Hz as a time base. They cut off the cable connecting the island with the continent for maintenance reasons. Their grid frequency is drifting freely now.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 07:13 AM
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reply to post by prof7
 





Did you even read the thread? These clocks are not crystal clocks, they are cheap electrical clocks that use the European grid frequency of 50Hz as a time base. They cut off the cable connecting the island with the continent for maintenance reasons. Their grid frequency is drifting freely now.


Question: if the grid is drifting freely, should other devices be affected too and not only clocks? Are oscillators only inside clocks?



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 07:56 AM
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Originally posted by prof7

Originally posted by ZackMorris
Microwaves are hooked up to some kind of frequency? Even when you manually entered the time?


They are counting the oscillations of the 50Hz power supply. they contain a digital counter that counts from 0 to 49 and then resets to 0 again. Each time it has reset to 0 it increases the display time by one second. Since the power supply is guaranteed to make exactly 50.000 oscillations per second this will run very precise.

But if they cut of the entire island from the continent and their power plant is running freely it might drift to maybe 40 per second or maybe 60 per second or even worse or everywhere in between. Then all such clocks will be wrong the same amount.

Try the following experiment. Get a cheap diesel generator, connect a few digital clocks (alarm clock, microwave and similar) to its power outlet and let it run for a few hours. I guarantee they will all go wrong after a while and all the same amount. This is what is happening there, only on a much larger scale.

How come when the electricity goes out (off the grid temporarily) the battery backup within my digital alarm clock ensures the clock's time remains reliable? What oscillations are being counted when there is electrical interruption?



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 08:05 AM
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They just don't make watches/appliances like they used to.

I think it is electromagnetic...maybe the slight deviation in polar north may have something to do with this?

Since many have said they also have been having the same problems. Coincidentally my time clock on my stove has been busted for a while and I don't wear watches or use alarm clocks, I use the alarm on my cell and all I have to tell the time is computer and cell phones, and my microwave got fried too, so no use of that digital time. Weird.
I say this because of all these things "cerpluncked" right before the Polar North deviation, too.
I also want to add that I live near Tampa, where they had to realign the airfield numbers because of the poler deviation and we have a very active lay line right in this area.
edit on 9-6-2011 by ldyserenity because: to add



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 10:29 AM
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Originally posted by grey580
reply to post by Hundroid
 


Quartz watches have a crystal that vibrates somewhere in the area of 40KHz if I'm not mistaken.
From there the watches circuitry can calculate the proper timing of the watch. That's why quartz watches can be so accurate within a few seconds a month.

Quartz watches are affected by temperature. That's why a thermo compensator is added to some watches for even more accuracy. Giving an accuracy of several seconds per year.

For a watch to be affected so that it's off by 20 mins? I don't know what would do that. Something other than just temperature would have to be affecting the watches crystal and circuitry.


wrist watches, and other RTC's (incuding the ones in your computer and microwave ovens) uses a standard 32.768kHz crystal. The crystal is normally enclosed in a hermetically sealed metal-package, so no electrical signals can interfere with it. The crystal is quartz too, so no magnetic interference is possible. It will drift with temperature, but in the case of wrist watches, the oscillator is stabilized by by your body heat, that is constant.

Some clocks derive their reference frequency from mains, so if there are glitches on the mains, and there is not adequate filtering, the clocks will run fast. If the mains frequency is not exactly 50Hz (60Hz in some countries), the clocks will run either fast or slow. (they sometimes have a battery back-up connected to a 32.768kHz oscillator).

So, if your wristwatch starts running fast, it can either be the battery running flat, or the temeperature compensation has failed, and if the clock runs fast/slow from mains, the mains frequency is wrong....

btw. if all wristwatches in an area starts running fast/slow simultaneously, most probably your computer wouldn't be as reliable too, because it uses a couple of quarts crystals, most probably your radio/TV would stop working, and your microwave wouldn't heat the food anymore... Time to head for the hills, (preferably on foot or bicycle or horseback), because all modern cars uses crystals in their various computers (ABS, engine management too)....



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 12:24 PM
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i have noticed this on a couple clocks lately. one battery powered and one clock radio which plugs in. both insist on creeping fast by about 8 minutes or so. the battery operated is easy to fix but the radio has a self time set and its bound and determined to stay ahead of schedule. both were quite cheap so maybe thats it but its something ive wondered about. oven and microwave clocks unaffected.

dont forget: time is an illusion. lunchtime, doubly so.





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