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24 Km Long Underwater Wall in India Is At Least 8000 Years Old.

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posted on Jun, 8 2011 @ 12:47 PM
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Did the coastline of the Konkan, from Shrivardhan in Raigad to Vengurla in Sindhudurg, host an advanced human civilization 8,000 years ago? Did that population have well-developed engineering skills? The latest discovery in the field of archaeology, below the sea waters of Konkan coast, seems to indicate so.



In what could turn out to be a major discovery, researchers have found a wall-like structure, which is 24km long, 2.7m in height, and around 2.5m in width. The structure shows uniformity in construction. “The structure is not continuous from Shrivardhan to Raigad, but it is uniform. It has been found 3m below the present sea level. It has been constructed on the ancient sand beach, which was taken as the base for the construction. Considering the uniformity of the structure, it is obvious that the structure is man-made,” said Dr Ashok Marathe, department of archaeology, Deccan College Postgraduate and Research Institute, Pune.



This joint expedition carried out by Deccan College, Pune and Department of Science and Technology, Central Government, has been in progress since 2005. “We were actually studying the impacts of tsunami and earthquake on western coast when we first found this structure in Valneshwar,” said Marathe.



The age of the structure was decided on the basis of sea level mapping. “There have been exhaustive studies about the sea water coming inside the land. Based on the calculations, experts from the National Institute of Oceanography (NIO) pegged the age of the wall at around 6,000 BC,” Marathe informed.



The discovery has raised a number of questions. What was the purpose behind building this wall? The dating of the wall is still an open question, is it contemporary or older than the Indus civilization?







Personally, I believe the walls are levees. Water levels rose and they tried to protect their land, in vain. A whole new chapter is now opening up in (underwater) archaeology. Exciting!

www.dnaindia.com...




posted on Jun, 8 2011 @ 12:54 PM
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well this is not really starting to open, discoveries like this have been made many times, but since they dont fit into the accept molds of written history, debate and controversy bury the issues.

this only shows are priorities are all twisted.

we want to go and figure out space other planets galaxies and the universe.
yet we still don't know what exactly lies in our ocean floors and our thickest jungles.

go figure

as for the wall in question here, im too lazy right now, but if we go through the vedas or the bhagavad gita, im sure there will be a story about this one too.

like the sethu samudram mythical bridge that was confirmed to have existed



posted on Jun, 8 2011 @ 01:00 PM
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Pretty cool. Ancient cities have been found underwater around there as well, including one that is supposedly Dwarka.

I like your hypothesis about them being levees as well.



posted on Jun, 8 2011 @ 03:38 PM
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The first thing I thought of when I saw this was the ancient city of Mohenjo Daro, because they also had excellent engineering and administrative skills to get things done, but after checking a history book because my knowledge of Indian history is pretty sketchy, it seems that this wall is about 4000 years older than that civilization. Maybe it was the ancestors of these people?



posted on Jun, 8 2011 @ 05:04 PM
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Well, the underwater findings in the Gulf of Cambay falls into mind. It was so hotly contested by other archaeologists because some of the finds dragged from the ocean floor were carbon dated up to 7500 B.C.

en.wikipedia.org...

But this find you can't really argue about. It seems to fit in with a major ecological change on the Indian subcontinent around that time. We could be looking at a contemporary or earlier civilization to the Indus Valley, and reasonably it should be along the sunken coastlines.



posted on Jun, 8 2011 @ 08:49 PM
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reply to post by Heliocentric
 


In the last 2 years archeological discoveries have been made in that neck of the woods. First was locating a city that was about 10k year old, and the second was locating the mythical land bridge that connected Indian to Sri Lanka.

Another ancient city was also located off the coast, but im not sure if it was a seperate one, or jsut an update on the origional discovery.

Either or, we are finding more and more signs that what we think about our history may not be correct. I still fail to understand why scientists, who by their very nature and profession is to seek the truth and to understand how things work, are so reluctant in this area.

Seems counter productive to me..



posted on Jun, 8 2011 @ 08:55 PM
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Originally posted by Heliocentric
Did the coastline of the Konkan, from Shrivardhan in Raigad to Vengurla in Sindhudurg, host an advanced human civilization 8,000 years ago? Did that population have well-developed engineering skills? The latest discovery in the field of archaeology, below the sea waters of Konkan coast, seems to indicate so.


I'm just wondering... how well-developed does an entire civilization need to be, really, to build a wall?

Other than that, this is a pretty cool find. I love these kinds of archaeological finds, that challenge accepted history. We can be arrogant quite often, thinking we know best how history should've played out, but our vantage point is a narrow one. As with my other subject of interest (physics), we don't know as much as we think we do.



posted on Jun, 8 2011 @ 09:06 PM
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reply to post by Heliocentric
 


So there's a wall. BFD. China has a wall that isn't underwater, does that mean they were / are any more of advanced civilization than those countries without walls? A two year told can build a wall with legos.

Who writes this stuff? A wall is found then BAM, it's warped into something like "Ooo advanced civilization!"

Bottom line: a wall is found, and it's very old.

I guess that would be too boring to read.


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posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 12:26 AM
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Originally posted by CLPrime
I'm just wondering... how well-developed does an entire civilization need to be, really, to build a wall?


It depends on the wall, wouldn't you say? And on what purpose the wall had. This is a big building project, which indicate an organization and resources of a certain size. I'm just playing with the idea that they are levees, it will have to be tested as a theory. In any case, this wall show that the people that lived there were not nomads or hunter gatherers. They valued this land, they were organized. This is important historically if we go back 8000 years in human history.


Originally posted by CLPrime
Other than that, this is a pretty cool find. I love these kinds of archaeological finds, that challenge accepted history.


I doesn't really challenge history, because history is not a dogma set in stone. It evolves as we discover more about our past, but it must be prudent before accepting something as proven beyond doubt.


Originally posted by daynight42
reply to post by Heliocentric
 

So there's a wall. BFD.

Bottom line: a wall is found, and it's very old.

I guess that would be too boring to read.


I take it your passion in life isn't archaeology or history.

That's okay. I feel the same thing about celebrity gossip or baseball.

Then again, I don't waste my time soliciting forums about it asking what difference it makes if JLO is pregnant or not.

edit on 9-6-2011 by Heliocentric because: For his morning tea A monk sits down in utter silence- Confronted by chrysanthemums.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 12:52 AM
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Its interesting how sea level was way lower back then.

I remember reading somewhere, here on ATS, about a submerged road or bridge that looked similar. But this one seems to be west of the maintaind, ill try to find the thread back to compare the location. Anyway, i say thanks for posting this I really like those finds. tbh i'm pretty sure ancient India hides alot of secrets.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 08:33 AM
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reply to post by eagleeye2
 


I would say that the west coast of India is one of the most interesting areas to search for early human presence. Genetic studies of certain populations of Kerala show that they are directly related to the earliest modern humans that left Africa approximately 75,000 to 50,000 years ago (if contemporary theories are correct).

Indian archaeological records show that modern human tools have been found in Jwalapuram, a 74,000-year-old site in southern India. They match those used in Africa from the same period.

The migrants seem to have stayed near the sea during much of the migration. That way they had acess to reliable sources of food (they could even have migrated using boats, because they reached Australia 20,000 years later). Ancient coastlines are particularly interesting for finding traces of the first baby-steps of civilization (apart from rivers and other fresh water sources), but in India these sites are now under water.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 10:21 AM
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Originally posted by Heliocentric

Originally posted by CLPrime
Other than that, this is a pretty cool find. I love these kinds of archaeological finds, that challenge accepted history.


I doesn't really challenge history, because history is not a dogma set in stone. It evolves as we discover more about our past, but it must be prudent before accepting something as proven beyond doubt.


I didn't say it challenges history. I said it challenges accepted history. As in, what we find in our history books. You may not think history is a dogma set in stone (and, if you read the rest of what I wrote, you'll know that I agree with you), but a lot of people do, and that's the problem - too many people think that what they "know" is how things have to be, when, in fact, reality is less than sympathetic to our expectations. People must be more open to finds like this, if they're truly interested history.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 11:35 AM
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Yes, you could be right about that.There can be quite a bit of bickering about what is officialy accepted 'true' history, which of course is but a version of what happened (dictated by the 'winners').



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 10:33 PM
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reply to post by Heliocentric
 


Thats fascinating stuff. Ive just spent quite a bit of time on the west coast of India, kerala included and I had no idea about their relation to the earliest man. India has some incredibly ancient buildings and it also have some very strange places, Hampi being one of them. Great find and nice work!


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posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 03:32 PM
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Originally posted by daynight42
reply to post by Heliocentric
 


So there's a wall. BFD. China has a wall that isn't underwater,


It might be helpful if you better understood the context of this possible find/site!
The area in question is submerged. {At least you somehow Neanderthalled your way through to that realization} Which brings us to the fact that at one time {If it's a legitimate site} that means it is was dry land during the walls construction.

Now when was that one might ask?


does that mean they were / are any more of advanced civilization than those countries without walls? A two year told can build a wall with legos.


I, unlike many here at ATS do not take the Ancient Indian myths at face value. Meaning, that there was at one time a {Technologically Advanced Civilization} in India. I'll keep hammering that home every chance I get BUT, I do believe that there were slightly more advanced ancient "megalithic level" builders/cultures/civilizations who were settled along those now submerged ancient coast lines {Not just India but elsewhere as well} which when the last of the ice-melt off occurred they had to pack up and head inland leaving now submerged megalithic sites and WALLS behind.


Who writes this stuff? A wall is found then BAM, it's warped into something like "Ooo advanced civilization!"


This is ATS. Many of our members do attempt an {out of the box} approach while trying to support and foster other ways of looking at things.


Bottom line: a wall is found, and it's very old. I guess that would be too boring to read.


Well now that you've demonstrated the ability to drag your hairy knuckles across the keyboard why don't you try to mash the keyboard some more and hammer out your own theory and or perspective on how this "WALL" could have found itself under the ocean during a period in human history when were supposedly closer to simple stone age hunter/gatherers etc?

Unless of course you're just here to criticize others....
edit on 21-7-2011 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 04:08 PM
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I'm concerned about a growing trend here on ATS - every morsel of old ruins being described as "advanced" civilisations without evidence in some cases - this is a case in point. Right now we have a long wall.

Whilst completely fascinating, it is arousing suspicion about a possible agenda/ - it is putting out an idea that is not supported by any evidence in this case.

1. We all know that a civilisation/s existed before what many call the great flood in many of our religions
2. There have been many ruins underwater that have been discovered over the past decades

I do love reading these posts, but the "advanced civilisation" angle, when not supported by any known evidence, should be in a speculative like forum



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 04:24 PM
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Originally posted by Heliocentric
Personally, I believe the walls are levees. Water levels rose and they tried to protect their land, in vain. A whole new chapter is now opening up in (underwater) archaeology. Exciting!



I thought harbour wall when I first saw it, but levee is as likely. Very nice find! Exciting indeed. Thanks for posting.



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 04:51 PM
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Originally posted by CLPrime
I didn't say it challenges history. I said it challenges accepted history. As in, what we find in our history books. You may not think history is a dogma set in stone (and, if you read the rest of what I wrote, you'll know that I agree with you), but a lot of people do, and that's the problem - too many people think that what they "know" is how things have to be, when, in fact, reality is less than sympathetic to our expectations. People must be more open to finds like this, if they're truly interested history.


They can do that by reading more up to date books and not relying on the internet as their sole source, as is too often the case with these threads on ATS. You will frequently hear complaints about this not being what we are taught in school. School is an introduction to education, offers a taster, it is up to the individual to pursue those topics that interest them further. If you do not study them more comprehensively, in your own time, of your own volition, then of course you will get left behind compared to others, but, unless you are not permitted access to a library, or are able to purchase books and periodicals, it is hardly someone else's fault. And if the textbooks in school are out of date, or erroneous, that is not so much a conspiracy to instil ignorance, as one of economics. Do people really expect to be spoon fed their whole lives? Then believe that they have a right to choose their diet?



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 06:00 PM
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Lake Agassiz was an immense glacial lake located in the center of North America. Fed by glacial runoff at the end of the last glacial period, its area was larger than all of the modern Great Lakes combined, and it held more water than contained by all lakes in the world today.[1]

During the last Ice Age, northern North America was covered by a glacie
Around 13,000 years BP the lake came to cover much of Manitoba, western Ontario, northern Minnesota, eastern North Dakota, and Saskatchewan. At its greatest extent, it may have covered as much as 440,000 square kilometers, larger than any currently existing lake in the world (including the Caspian Sea).


Geologists have found evidence that a major outbreak of Lake Agassiz about 13,000 BP drained north through the Mackenzie River into the Arctic Ocean A return of the ice for some time offered a reprieve, but after retreating north of the Canada – United States border about 9,900 years ago, Lake Agassiz refilled. The last major shift in drainage occurred about 8,400 years BP. The melting of remaining Hudson Bay ice caused lake Agassiz to drain nearly completely. This final drainage of Lake Agassiz contributed an estimated 1 to 3 meters to total post-glacial global sea level rise. Much of the final drainage may have occurred in a very short time, in one or two events, perhaps taking as little as a year.
en.wikipedia.org...

This could of been what made them build a wall.
I would guesstimate that most of the ancient coastal cities were lost around 8000 b.c
edit on 21-7-2011 by Shadow Herder because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 06:10 PM
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reply to post by Shadow Herder
 


Six to Eight thousand B.C. seems to be an exciting time with the global ocean levels.

Lost civilization may have been beneath Persian Gulf

At its peak, the floodplain now below the Gulf would have been about the size of Great Britain, and then shrank as water began to flood the area. Then, about 8,000 years ago, the land would have been swallowed up by the Indian Ocean

Watery refuge
The Gulf Oasis would have been a shallow inland basin exposed from about 75,000 years ago until 8,000 years ago, forming the southern tip of the Fertile Crescent, according to historical sea-level records.

"Perhaps it is no coincidence that the founding of such remarkably well developed communities along the shoreline corresponds with the flooding of the Persian Gulf basin around 8,000 years ago," Rose said. "These new colonists may have come from the heart of the Gulf, displaced by rising water levels that plunged the once fertile landscape beneath the waters of the Indian Ocean."





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