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Elenin is NOT a brown dwarf

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posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 01:01 PM
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reply to post by dmac359
 


Then it wouldn't be a brown dwarf would it?




posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 01:10 PM
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reply to post by Xcalibur254
 


Hey i don't make the catagories
"Category Supernovas & Supernova Remnants"

Just calling it the way it is described by the people at nasa i figure they know what catagory it belongs too. Well i hope they do anyway.
edit on 7-6-2011 by BobAthome because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 01:12 PM
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reply to post by dmac359
 


What if it had a piece of anti-matter stuck in its side?
now i like that kind of thinking,, ant-mater would not let light escape right,,, soooooo no light ,, no see,,,, instant shield
see what outside the box does



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 01:34 PM
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reply to post by BobAthome
 



ant-mater would not let light escape right

Why do you think that is true?

Supernova remnants are not brown dwarfs and antimatter is reflective as well.



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 01:38 PM
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How did this thread migrate into a supernova remnant 25,000 light years away? Something not currently reachable by humans in their entire lifetimes?



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 01:44 PM
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Originally posted by stereologist
A misconception in this thread is that brown dwarfs are not reflective in visible light. All of the objects we see in our solar system except for the sun are visible due to reflection. A brown dwarf has a similar composition to Jupiter. Just as Jupiter is bright due to reflections o would a brown dwarf be easily seen if it were in the solar system.


Good point. Brown Dwarfs are a bit larger than Jupiter. Seeing that Elenin is currently just outside of Mars orbit, it would be EXTREMELY bright in our sky if it was a reflecting brown dwarf.



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 01:52 PM
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reply to post by stereologist
 


Ask the people at CERN,,apparantly they observed some anti-matter for 17 minutes,,, they would know.
Point being,,, does light escape from anti-matter,,,it is now a known fact if it does or not.
I will leave it up too those people too answer that question.
Just speculation on my part,,has to do with density and wave lenghts.



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 01:54 PM
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reply to post by Tom_Proctor
 


Sorry your wrong in that assumption.

"Brown Dwarfs - down to 0.085M the number of stars increases dramatically as you go to stars of lower mass. Does this trend continue as one goes below the cutoff for the ignition of nuclear reactions? If so, failed stars, called Brown Dwarfs, might account for a significant fraction of the Dark Matter. Brown Dwarfs are hard to spot since they are cool and very low in luminosity. Recent infrared studies are finding Brown Dwarfs, but not in sufficient numbers to make up the dark matter needed in the Milky Way. "



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 01:59 PM
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reply to post by Tom_Proctor
 


Could Elenin be a black hole? That would explain the mass gravitational effects and the lack of visibility. The matter that can be seen would be matter following it that has not crossed it's event horizon.

If it is a comet why is it's tail not visible?



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 02:08 PM
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reply to post by BobAthome
 


What is he wrong about? Luminosity is not the same thing as how reflective an object is. Luminosity refers to the amount of light an object produces on its own. Our Sun is luminous as it has sustained nuclear fusion, thus creating light. The planets have zero luminosity, but are visible due to reflecting the light produced by the Sun. The composition of a brown dwarf is almost identical to a gas giant, thus would reflect a similar amount of light. So, if Elenin is a brown dwarf it would be extremely visible in its current position. We're talking about an object larger and closer than Jupiter, but with a similar composition. Now, Jupiter appears as one of the brightest objects in the sky, so wouldn't we easily see a larger and closer object that also produces some light of its own?



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 02:11 PM
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reply to post by yourmamaknows
 


A black hole in the current position of Elenin would have ripped the planets out of their orbits and there would be a very visible affect on the Sun at this point. It is absolutely impossible for this object to be a black hole.



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 02:11 PM
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reply to post by yourmamaknows
 


All comets should have tails. Good question!



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 02:14 PM
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Originally posted by BobAthome
reply to post by dmac359
 


What if it had a piece of anti-matter stuck in its side?
now i like that kind of thinking,, ant-mater would not let light escape right,,, soooooo no light ,, no see,,,, instant shield
see what outside the box does


If Elenin produces a substantial gravitational effect in Sept. and still is very hard to spot, I vote for a black hole. A month ago, it was, "where's the birth certificate". Now I say, "where's the tail"? Show me the tail.



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 02:20 PM
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Originally posted by Xcalibur254
reply to post by yourmamaknows
 


A black hole in the current position of Elenin would have ripped the planets out of their orbits and there would be a very visible affect on the Sun at this point. It is absolutely impossible for this object to be a black hole.


You're thinking of a large black hole, possibly the size of Jupiter. But it could be much smaller, but still have enough mass to exert a gravitational effect. We don't know that much about such objects. Didn't science just recently (10-15 years) find a massive one at the center of the Milky Way Galaxy?



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 02:23 PM
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It must be a black dwarf.


en.wikipedia.org...

Seriously tho, if we used to be a binary system like most other stars, our sister star could be long dead and this could be the remains. Of course scientists have yet to find a black dwarf but they are theorized to either exist today or in the future.



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 02:29 PM
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reply to post by Xcalibur254
 


quote
"So, if Elenin is a brown dwarf "
unquote


I give up.

See OP opening title,, i thought those facts were already established,, so whats the point,,

yes Elenin is a brown dwarf comet,,,,and g1903 is of no consequence. Everybody happy.

seriously.
edit on 7-6-2011 by BobAthome because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-6-2011 by BobAthome because: and fact is fairy dust



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 02:34 PM
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reply to post by BobAthome
 


Look, there could be interstellar objects of Elenin's size that are extremely dense that could cause quakes on Earth if they got too close. They say Elenin is a comet but I have yet to see any actual measurements of it's density.



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 02:36 PM
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reply to post by BobAthome
 



Ask the people at CERN,,apparantly they observed some anti-matter for 17 minutes,,, they would know.
Point being,,, does light escape from anti-matter,,,it is now a known fact if it does or not.


Think this one through for yourself. If light doesn't escape from anti-matter, how could scientists at CERN observe it?



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 02:42 PM
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reply to post by BIGPoJo
 



Look, there could be interstellar objects of Elenin's size that are extremely dense...


There are; they are called "black holes."


...that could cause quakes on Earth if they got too close.


They would also disrupt the orbits of the planets, slosh the Earth's oceans all over the place and suck a huge stream of glowing plasma from the Sun. Comet Elenin is definitely not causing any of those effects.


They say Elenin is a comet but I have yet to see any actual measurements of it's density.


How do you propose they do that? They would need to know the exact size of its nucleus and its mass. It is still too far away to make an accurate measurement of its size, and they are attempting to determine its mass by the effect it has on asteroids in the asteroid belt.



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 02:50 PM
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Originally posted by DJW001
reply to post by BIGPoJo
 



Look, there could be interstellar objects of Elenin's size that are extremely dense...


There are; they are called "black holes."


...that could cause quakes on Earth if they got too close.


They would also disrupt the orbits of the planets, slosh the Earth's oceans all over the place and suck a huge stream of glowing plasma from the Sun. Comet Elenin is definitely not causing any of those effects.


They say Elenin is a comet but I have yet to see any actual measurements of it's density.


How do you propose they do that? They would need to know the exact size of its nucleus and its mass. It is still too far away to make an accurate measurement of its size, and they are attempting to determine its mass by the effect it has on asteroids in the asteroid belt.


Not all dense small objects are black holes.
I agree with your second quote, look how far away Elenin is.
They can't do density measurements, which proves my point. No one knows how dense it is which can lead to speculation.

I am not claiming to know what Elenin is but everyone will know what it is for sure when it gets close at the end of this year. Chances are is that it is a comet, but lets not exclude other possibilities.



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