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you dont wont to disappear do you...

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posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 12:14 AM
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100 Items to Disappear First some are useless in a survival scenario but you know these government believers "The government will help us... don't worry"

1. Generators (Good ones cost dearly. Gas storage, risky. Noisy...target of thieves; maintenance etc.)
2. Water Filters/Purifiers
3. Portable Toilets
4. Seasoned Firewood. Wood takes about 6 - 12 months to become dried, for home uses.
5. Lamp Oil, Wicks, Lamps (First Choice: Buy CLEAR oil. If scarce,
stockpile ANY!)
6. Coleman Fuel. Impossible to stockpile too much.
7. Guns, Ammunition, Pepper Spray, Knives, Clubs, Bats & Slingshots.
8. Hand-can openers, & hand egg beaters, whisks.
9. Honey/Syrups/white, brown sugar
10. Rice - Beans - Wheat
11. Vegetable Oil (for cooking) Without it food burns/must be boiled etc.,)
12. Charcoal, Lighter Fluid (Will become scarce suddenly)
13. Water Containers (Urgent Item to obtain.) Any size. Small: HARD CLEAR PLASTIC
ONLY - note - food grade if for drinking.
14. Mini Heater head (Propane) (Without this item, propane won't heat a room.)
15. Grain Grinder (Non-electric)
16. Propane Cylinders (Urgent: Definite shortages will occur.
17. Survival Guide Book.
18. Mantles: Aladdin, Coleman, etc. (Without this item, longer-term lighting is
difficult.)
19. Baby Supplies: Diapers/formula. ointments/aspirin, etc.
20. Washboards, Mop Bucket w/wringer (for Laundry)
21. Cookstoves (Propane, Coleman & Kerosene)
22. Vitamins
23. Propane Cylinder Handle-Holder (Urgent: Small canister use is dangerous
without this item)24. Feminine Hygiene/Haircare/Skin products.
25. Thermal underwear (Tops & Bottoms)
26. Bow saws, axes and hatchets, Wedges (also, honing oil)
27. Aluminum Foil Reg. & Heavy Duty (Great Cooking and Barter Item)
28. Gasoline Containers (Plastic & Metal)
29. Garbage Bags (Impossible To Have Too Many).
30. Toilet Paper, Kleenex, Paper Towels
31. Milk - Powdered & Condensed (Shake Liquid every 3 to 4 months)
32. Garden Seeds (Non-Hybrid) (A MUST)
33. Clothes pins/line/hangers (A MUST)
34. Coleman's Pump Repair Kit
35. Tuna Fish (in oil)
36. Fire Extinguishers (or..large box of Baking Soda in every room)
37. First aid kits
38. Batteries (all sizes...buy furthest-out for Expiration Dates)
39. Garlic, spices & vinegar, baking supplies
40. Big Dogs (and plenty of dog food)
41. Flour, yeast & salt
42. Matches. ["Strike Anywhere" preferred.) Boxed, wooden matches will go
first
43. Writing paper/pads/pencils, solar calculators
44. Insulated ice chests (good for keeping items from freezing in
Wintertime.)
45. Work Boots, belts, Levis & durable shirts
46. Flashlights/LIGHTSTICKS & torches, "No. 76 Dietz" Lanterns
47. Journals, Diaries & Scrapbooks (jot down ideas, feelings,
experience; Historic Times)
48. Garbage cans Plastic (great for storage, water, transporting - if with wheels)
49. Men's Hygiene: Shampoo, Toothbrush/paste, Mouthwash/floss, nail clippers, etc
50. Cast iron cookware (sturdy, efficient)
51. Fishing supplies/tools
52. Mosquito coils/repellent, sprays/creams
53. Duct Tape
54. Tarps/stakes/twine/nails/rope/spikes
55. Candles
56. Laundry Detergent (liquid)
57. Backpacks, Duffel Bags
58. Garden tools & supplies
59. Scissors, fabrics & sewing supplies
60. Canned Fruits, Veggies, Soups, stews, etc.
61. Bleach (plain, NOT scented: 4 to 6% sodium hypochlorite)
62. Canning supplies, (Jars/lids/wax)
63. Knives & Sharpening tools: files, stones, steel
64. Bicycles...Tires/tubes/pumps/chains, etc
65. Sleeping Bags & blankets/pillows/mats
66. Carbon Monoxide Alarm (battery powered)
67. Board Games, Cards, Dice
68. d-con Rat poison, MOUSE PRUFE II, Roach Killer
69. Mousetraps, Ant traps & cockroach magnets
70. Paper plates/cups/utensils (stock up, folks)
71. Baby wipes, oils, waterless & Antibacterial soap (saves a lot of water)
72. Rain gear, rubberized boots, etc.
73. Shaving supplies (razors & creams, talc, after shave)
74. Hand pumps & siphons (for water and for fuels)
75. Soy Sauce, vinegar, bullion's/gravy/soup base
76. Reading glasses
77. Chocolate/Cocoa/Tang/Punch (water enhancers)
78. "Survival-in-a-Can"
79. Woolen clothing, scarves/ear-muffs/mittens
80. Boy Scout Handbook, / also Leaders Catalog
81. Roll-on Window Insulation Kit (MANCO)
82. Graham crackers, saltines, pretzels, Trail mix/Jerky
83. Popcorn, Peanut Butter, Nuts
84. Socks, Underwear, T-shirts, etc. (extras)
85. Lumber (all types)
86. Wagons & carts (for transport to and from)
87. Cots & Inflatable mattress's
88. Gloves: Work/warming/gardening, etc.
89. Lantern Hangers
90. Screen Patches, glue, nails, screws,, nuts & bolts
91. Teas
92. Coffee
93. Cigarettes
94. Wine/Liquors (for bribes, medicinal, etc,)
95. Paraffin wax
96. Glue, nails, nuts, bolts, screws, etc.
97. Chewing gum/candies
98. Atomizers (for cooling/bathing)
99. Hats & cotton neckerchiefs
100. Goats/chickens
_____________________________________________________________________________________
1. Stockpiling helps. but you never no how long trouble will last, so
locate near renewable food sources.

2. Living near a well with a manual pump is like being in Eden.

3. After awhile, even gold can lose its luster. But there is no luxury in war quite like toilet paper.
Its surplus value is greater than gold's.

4. If you had to go without one utility, lose electricity - it's the easiest to do without
(unless you're in a very nice climate with no need for heat.)

5. Canned foods are awesome, especially if their contents are tasty without
heating. One of the best things to stockpile is canned gravy - it makes
a lot of the dry unappetizing things you find to eat in war somewhat
edible. Only needs enough heat to "warm", not to cook. It's cheap too,
especially if you buy it in bulk.

6. Bring some books - escapist ones like romance or mysteries become more valuable as the war
continues. Sure, it's great to have a lot of survival guides, but you'll
figure most of that out on your own anyway - trust me, you'll have a
lot of time on your hands.

7. The feeling that you're human can fade pretty fast. I can't tell you how many people I knew who would have
traded a much needed meal for just a little bit of toothpaste, rouge,
soap or cologne. Not much point in fighting if you have to lose your
humanity. These things are morale-builders like nothing else.

8. Slow burning candles and matches, matches, matches!

forgot to add credit

snardfarker.ning.com...
edit on 6-6-2011 by THEwTRUTH because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 12:28 AM
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why does everyone press matches????
a lighter takes up the same room as a box of them and lights hundreds of fires compared to 50 mathes in a box, and they if they get damp..well its lights out..
but a lighter can be dried in the sun to work again..
and a striker steel set lights 1000's of fires and takes up the same space qas 2 lighters for a big one..
The list is interesting to say the least. some things might go quickly on the list but it dosnt mean they are actually worth it.
one thing not on the list many dont think about is packets of seeds..
carrots, tomatoes pumpkin etc..
now theres some barter items right there, nothing like your own fruit and veg when its all gone .

edit on 6-6-2011 by sprocket2cog because: typos and spelling.. the matrix made me do it..



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 12:34 AM
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I like the effort and the list.......

There is one problem though.....

This list will get you on the watch list for the wonderful local police and state officials. You have listed half of the things that are on the Meth watch list around here.
You would be scrutinized...and note to self....do not buy the Coleman fuel, batteries, aliminum foil, and the propane all at the same time. You might get a visit.


I do have a friend that got in trouble for purchasing Coleman fuel. Two felonies.

edit on 6-6-2011 by liejunkie01 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 12:38 AM
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Originally posted by liejunkie01
would be scrutinized...and note to self....do not buy the Coleman fuel, batteries, aliminum foil, and the propane all at the same time. You might get a visit.



That sounds like a shopping list for a normal weekend camping trip.



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 12:43 AM
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Originally posted by liejunkie01
I like the effort and the list.......

There is one problem though.....

This list will get you on the watch list for the wonderful local police and state officials. You have listed half of the things that are on the Meth watch list around here.
You would be scrutinized...and note to self....do not buy the Coleman fuel, batteries, aliminum foil, and the propane all at the same time. You might get a visit.


I do have a friend that got in trouble for purchasing Coleman fuel. Two felonies.

edit on 6-6-2011 by liejunkie01 because: (no reason given)


Two felonies?? What was he doing with the stuff? To get a felony one must be convicted of a crime, is it a crime to buy but not to sell?



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 12:58 AM
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Nice list, I think you missed to mention the power of the inverter though.

With enough12 v batteries and even a simple 5watt Solar panel, you could recharge a battery and with a lets say, a 700 watt inverter, with lower watt CFL bulbs you could easily run a string of lights off that one inverter, then you can have other ones with higher levels, run a small window unit or frigerator with the right bank and inverters and watts you can making a quiet, easy, muti-functional power system.

I have ran fans, and 7-10 lights off the same 700 watt Die Hard inverter on a 12 volt marine battery for a long time.




posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 12:59 AM
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Originally posted by Partygirl

Originally posted by liejunkie01
would be scrutinized...and note to self....do not buy the Coleman fuel, batteries, aliminum foil, and the propane all at the same time. You might get a visit.



That sounds like a shopping list for a normal weekend camping trip.



I know.....Here in the midwest "they" have enacted many laws to help curb the problem . You have to show your license and sign for a box of Sudafed. Kind of communist...but it is a serious problem.


Sorry op I am not trying to be too off topic, but that is what your list gets you around here........I just got back from camping today. I was jones'n for my ATS...

I used gasoline instead of Coleman fuel. CF is $10 a gallon. 87 octane is $3.8something a gallon. It worked just as good.



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 01:02 AM
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As much as i enjoy this list of items and supplies and find it very informative, dont try to peddle it as your own. This is a well know list from a website i frequent often. Give credit where credit is due.



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 01:03 AM
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reply to post by Greensage
 





Two felonies?? What was he doing with the stuff? To get a felony one must be convicted of a crime, is it a crime to buy but not to sell?


Of course there is a little more to the story. He was giving another person a ride and that is all I will say of the incident......



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 01:07 AM
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for us 21st century survivalists.

we supplment our generators with solar and wind and hand cranked for power needs.

we also still use kerosense lanterns supplmented with rechargable batteries when we dont wanan make a torch for our lightning and radio needs.

in some situations an open fire just might end up killing you.

we also use desiel and make our own bio deseil.

yeah some will say that too dependent on power but hey if the world ends your going to want a little comfort

and i am telling you all this a little comfort if the shtf will go a long way.

not to mention it will give you something you can barter with to replace some things and get things you werent able to get before.

and you will be able to barter your power generation recharging batteries etc for more supplies.
edit on 6-6-2011 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 01:17 AM
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Originally posted by Retikx
As much as i enjoy this list of items and supplies and find it very informative, dont try to peddle it as your own. This is a well know list from a website i frequent often. Give credit where credit is due.


i never said in anyway it was mine i didn't even put an i me mine so don't accuse me of doing such a thing any way all the sites out there are saying much the same thing so there is going to be one of witch that is the same and for giving credit that what happens when you don't proof read talk 'bout embarrassing



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 03:49 AM
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reply to post by THEwTRUTH
 


This is from google ...first 100 things to dissapear ....from Bosnia in the 1990's .
There is a lot of good information out there on things to have...that many over look.
The big thing he stresses is TP and books...



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 10:07 AM
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reply to post by neo96
 


Yeah we get comfortable. Thats why my favorite tool is the solar/inverter kit I got. I have a small 2 bedroom cottage thats light 9 and 2 fans 1 in the bathroom and in the kitchen all run off 1 700 watt inverter 1 marine battery.

That right there is enough power to sustain a pretty decent quality of post destruction living. You could even hook it all up in a well built debris hut.

I got solar fan hat clips, hand crank/solar light and lanterns, radios. Love it all.

Everytime I see something hand crank powered I get it, its like a thing i got going on lol.



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 12:11 PM
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It's always interesting to read lists derived from actual incidents. Thanks for posting.

Among my bartering gear I have 50 pounds of pure wax. It's not the most practical bartering item but it was given to me for free so I keep it around for this purpose. If you are planning on storing wax you should also have on hand the additives that are added to the wax of all survival, long burn candles and also the proper wick type and size for the size of mold you will be using. Without the proper wick type and size a candle won't burn well or at all.



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 12:53 PM
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reply to post by JAGx1981
 


The math for your system doesn't seem to add up for me.

Directly feeding a solar panel into a marine battery even without a charge controller (which you can get away with for a 5 watt solar panel) you have to put 1.4 times more power into a lead acid battery than you get out. So now you are down to 3.6 watts. If you babysit your panel so that it points at the sun all day and you live somewhere near the equator then you will be able to get the equivalent of 9 hours of ideal charge in good weather (at my latitude we have to degrade that by almost 40% and in the winter the sun is very low in the sky and is only up between 8:30 and 4pm but we'll ignore that right now. So 9*3.6 is 32 watt hours. If you have purchased a very expensive inverter it's conversion efficiency may be up around 90%. 29*0.9 is 29 watt hours. This means that with ideal charging you will be able to run one 25 watt bulb for one hour and 10 minutes a day before your battery dies. At 700 watts of draw (the maximum rated draw of your inverter) your battery could run for a maximum of two and a half minutes a day.

Am I misunderstanding the description of what you are recomending?



posted on Jun, 8 2011 @ 09:58 AM
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reply to post by dainoyfb
 


Yeah you missread it and got my first post confused with my second, my fault too. I used the 5w panel as a example of how you can use a smaller panel if need be in the first post. I have a 150 watt panel to charge a bank of 12 batts.

I use low watts on the cfls bulb which allow me to use more.

5 watt cfls, plus a fan, off the inverter, it has a 1000 peak, if you try to use higher watts with this certain unit, it would only run on like 1 regular light bulb and a fan.

The low watts of the cfl is the key though.


edit on 8-6-2011 by JAGx1981 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 10 2011 @ 12:01 PM
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reply to post by JAGx1981
 


Why ?

LED's are the way to go.


en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jun, 10 2011 @ 12:46 PM
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Originally posted by neo96
for us 21st century survivalists.

we supplment our generators with solar and wind and hand cranked for power needs.

we also still use kerosense lanterns supplmented with rechargable batteries when we dont wanan make a torch for our lightning and radio needs.

in some situations an open fire just might end up killing you.

we also use desiel and make our own bio deseil.

yeah some will say that too dependent on power but hey if the world ends your going to want a little comfort

and i am telling you all this a little comfort if the shtf will go a long way.

not to mention it will give you something you can barter with to replace some things and get things you werent able to get before.

and you will be able to barter your power generation recharging batteries etc for more supplies.
edit on 6-6-2011 by neo96 because: (no reason given)


Very good points.

I have gone to portable USB solar and eneloop batteries. For me wind is a flag saying here we are. I sold off my larger 12 v solar cells and batteries to become more portable. The USB folder can be covered at about 2' distance with personal camo netting and never be seen from the air or a high vantage point and still charge at a slower rate in the sun. Entire package is less than 2# and can charge phones and other devices as well the stock of AA,AAA eneloops. They are good for 1500 charges.

Transpo has been cut to a large tire mountain bike and a folding economy sized trailer. The handle flips up so it can become a cart. That carries my INCB bag. The remaining pounds are being worked out with high calorie dried meals. Since its me a a 4# dog he gets a den to call home when camp is set or I need to stash him for a bit. I have some Krylon and a good waterproof cover. These fit into the car or can carry between vehicles as they come up.

www.amazon.com...=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=sporting-goods&qid=1307727666&sr=8-1

Good response. Modern folks are making huge changes to outdated lists.


One more thing that gets charged via USB......901 and 510 electronic cig batteries. The Juice thats stored is natural flavors and smells such as mint and common things. Its also dissipates within a couple feet so there is no 200 meter smoke trail. My stock up items are extra blank tips and juice. Enough to hook a couple people up when they are crawling in their skin.
edit on 10-6-2011 by Shadowalker because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 10 2011 @ 01:33 PM
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Originally posted by liejunkie01

I do have a friend that got in trouble for purchasing Coleman fuel. Two felonies.


I refuse to believe he got convicted of felonies for buying Coleman fuel. He got in trouble for cooking Meth (I'm assuming)

Coleman fuel is perfectly legal, there is no reason to be scared to buy such things, unless of course you are actually cooking meth.

Interesting list. I agree with a previous poster about matches. They are pretty worthless compared to lighters. Get a display pack of 100 Bic lighters. Pretty cheap, and will probably give you fire for the rest of your life with that many. Fire steel is also great to have on hand, but matches serve no purpose in my opinion, I don't understand at all why so many people have them in their BOBs or SHTF stockpiles. For the space, weight, and amount of fire, Bic lighters are bar none the BEST option. And they aren't expensive, fragile, or hard to find, so I just don't understand getting matches at all. I personally have a few torch lighters, as well as a pro-torch, and propane cylinder torch attachment. These are great for starting fires with moist wood and tinder, that matches or lighters would have an almost impossible time setting ablaze.

Personally I would just skip trying to keep electricity, at least in the short term. The bulk, weight, and cost of trying to stay in the electric age after TSHTF could be much better used with other things, in my opinion. But if I was going to go with electricity, I would skip inverters and CFL bulbs. If you get some LEDs, wired up so they run on 12-14v, then you can easily directly charge a car battery, and then directly run the LEDs off it. You don't waste any of the energy you would by pushing inverters and transformers and all that mess. Plus keeping everything low voltage and DC is safer.

www.dealextreme.com has tons of LEDs you can buy and make your own LED setup. I actually made my own custom LED bulb setup that works perfectly in your standard house light fixture. Cost me about 20 bucks total, and puts out more light than the $50 LED commercial bulbs. I also made an LED array for my backyard that uses a 12v car battery, and an old exercise bike hooked up to a high output F-150 alternator, both of which I got off Craigslist. The whole system cost me a little over $70 including the LEDS and battery, and would light up several indoor rooms if moved indoors, but I mainly made it for lighting my back-yard during parties, and it worked GREAT. Imagine LEDs on a long strand, kind of like Christmas lights.

So great in fact, that a guest that a friend brought ended up buying the whole system from me for $250. He paid me an additional $250 (including supplies) to incorporate some cheap harbor-freight solar panels into the system. Apparently he is using it for the same purpose I was, but relies on the solar panels more often than using the exercise bike lol.

I really do think Duct Tape and heavy duty black garbage bags are an INCREDIBLE asset for their cost and bulk. A few rolls of HD black bags can be used for almost anything. Waterproofing a shelter, as a rain coat, water storage, or any other water-proofing needs. Combined with the duct tape you can make yourself a comfortable and (albeit noisy) waterproof shelter pretty much ANYWHERE in the world. And all this would take up far less space than a tent. Although it would be more fragile and hard to re-use.

Cordage is also essential. Several hundred feet of para-cord is worth its weight in gold in my opinion. Again, like the duct tape and garbage bags, almost unlimited uses. Nets, climbing rope, shelter manufacture, weapon making, wound dressing, snare, the list goes on and on.

Personally I lean more towards having a huge stockpile of fewer, but more essential item, than a large assortment of various other things. But it is a balancing act for each person to decide on what's best for THEM based on location, purchasing ability, needs/wants, storage ability, and what situation they think is most likely to happen, where their stockpile will be of use. I also like things that are extremely useful for every day things, and not just survival situations. It makes your dollar go farther when you can get something that you need and use right now, instead of something you just store away on the chance something might go down.

Another thing I argue with a few of my friends about is the need for propane or other fuel powered stoves and heaters. If you have the ability to start a fire, and you have a pot you can use, I don't see the need to spend money and take up space with a stove. Your fuel will run out eventually and then you just have a large expensive paperweight, whos cost and space could have been dedicated to something more long term and useful.

Those Mylar emergency blankets are really good as well. I had a bunch of them in a first aid kit I took with me camping one time. It was towards the beginning of summer, and was pretty hot, but by night fall it got REALLY cold and rainy. I used one of those Mylar blankets, and man did that thing heat me up. Can also be used as a signaling device, waterproofing cover, any many other things. Plus it's extremely compact and light weight. That same night I also dug a hole, put one of the blankets in the hold, and collected rainwater to drink. I had plenty of bottled water with me, but figured why waste it if I could collect free rainwater. Rain water is pretty clean, but I let it sit out in the sun the next day, with the blanket acting as a reflector, to further disinfect the water by using the sun.

I'm sure I'm not saying anything new here, but figured I'd throw out my personal strategy, which is to stockpile a lot of really cheap, compact, lightweight, and multi-use items. I really don't like the specialty survival gear for the most part, it's a lot of expensive and limited use stuff that I can totally do without, and be much better prepared with more common items that I can get for less money.
edit on 10-6-2011 by James1982 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 10 2011 @ 02:18 PM
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reply to post by Shadowalker
 


yeah i took a page from "green technology" those misguided people think they can save the world which is an impoosible task.

but people have a better chance to save their own butts.

my motto is modern adaptation to survivalism the key to be flexible




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