The C14 radio carbon dating confirm: The Bosnian "Moon" Pyramid was build 10,000 years ago!

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posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 02:40 AM
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Unfortunately even if the material really was found in situ and really is 10.35k old, it cannot be accepted as evidence because no proper archaeological excavation has been carried out.

Just claiming you found something whilst digging around in the bedrock, close to the surface, is proof of absolutely nothing. Except perhaps the religious zeal of those involved in this scam.




posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 03:16 AM
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“When you want to fool the world, tell the truth.”
Otto von Bismarck



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 03:25 AM
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I researched some time ago these pyramids, and I read that these are more natural than artificial. These structures are build on top and inside these hills..nevertheless interesting..
btw, this ´bosnian pyramids´ have become a big tourist attraction and is used for nationalistic porposes also..



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 03:38 AM
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Originally posted by Essan
Unfortunately even if the material really was found in situ and really is 10.35k old, it cannot be accepted as evidence because no proper archaeological excavation has been carried out.

Just claiming you found something whilst digging around in the bedrock, close to the surface, is proof of absolutely nothing. Except perhaps the religious zeal of those involved in this scam.


I can picture it now.

Let assume that everyone just gets shovels and digs up the mountain. Let's assume on the off-chance that they do find an ancient massive pyramid structure with huge stone megaliths etc.

Will the entire world call it a hoax still since it was dug up by nobodies? Will everyone say the stupid Bosnians somehow build the pyramid as a huge hoax to create tourism? Seriously?

Are degrees and diplomas the only thing that matters? If someone has a degree are they perfect now and never make mistakes or screw up? How come people without degrees are 100% unreliable but people with degrees are 100% reliable?

Have you ever thought that maybe common sense and facts are actually better than any "official piece of paper"? Or is the piece of paper golden and common sense and the facts of reality have to take a back seat?



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 03:42 AM
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I have a Pyramid of remarks...


Political level: after the war, the region needed something to unite people again. What would be better than an ancient past of technological supremacy? Something that would show how powerful they were among Europeans 10.000 years ago...

Historical level: If those pyramids were there, why isn't a single reference to them in History records? Greeks and Romans travelled the area, Romans even established themselves there for a good long period. Why is it that there's not a single line about it? Check the Herodotus records and you'll find amazing reports no-where to be found today of several architectonical wonders of the past.

Geology level: it's been several times documented how ancient tribes used orographical accidents to build structures upon or through. Those could easily be pyramids-like mountains, covered with pathways and tunneled. But that doesnt' make them a pyramid at all and would be still far away from the engeneering complexity of erecting a pyramid. In short: show us some strings of blocks one over the other please.

Geology level 2: if I dig on the basement of my house and find some piece or object that can be C14-ed, and the data shows it to be 150.000 years old, do I have to infere my house and basement are that age?

Academic level: I cant find articles sustained or published by University Departments. I cant find info on any European University about this. What's going on? Are they blocking the truth or is the truth being deformed?











edit on 6-6-2011 by AboveTheTrees because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 04:40 AM
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reply to post by Kandinsky
 





There is no 'Bosnian pyramid.'


I think in many peoples minds the jury is still out. Since when have you become an expert...



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 05:01 AM
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I wonder how much money Osman has made from this fraud?



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 05:25 AM
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Hello,

A good place to begin--information from the "horse's mouth" so-to-speak, Semir Osmanagich (parts 1-5):
www.youtube.com... (previously posted in this thread)

There are a number of observations to be made here. First of all, there is a team of archaeologists working at this site, and many more that are attending and speaking at conferences organized by the foundation set up to study these sites. While many are taking interest and are compelled by the anomalous findings, others, as we have seen, are highly skeptical if not outright dismissive. As there are highly respected archaeologists on both sides, this could become a wedge issue that divides the field of archaeology into two camps. Archaeology as a whole could lose an enormous amount of credibility (a house divided will fall), with the public either convinced that one side is falling for some sort of hoax, misinterpreting evidence on a wide-scale, etc. or that the other side is egotistically-driven to hold firm to their prior convictions, academically dishonest, driven to protect their jobs, reputation, etc. (this is a rather simplistic way of putting it, but you get the point I hope). As you will note from the video, there are other scientists studying these sites, such as geologists. So far, two respected teams of geologists have independently confirmed with ground-penetrating radar no less than 44 anamolous signatures indicating artificiality. Will other teams of geologists study these sites and come to a different conclusion? Time will tell.

Upon watching the videos, I was taken aback by the shape of the "hill," "pyramid," whatever you want to call it, the one being referred to as the Bosnian Pyramid of the Sun (BPOTS). If not a man-made structure, one must admit that such a shape formed by nature as to almost perfectly resemble a four-sided pyramid would be an incredible natural wonder in-and-of-itself. Of course, this is only the "tip of the pyramid." The alignment of the BPOTS is interesting--a perfect alignment with the cardinal points (and supposedly aligned with the north star, but I do not understand the reasoning behind this claim). The BPOTS is also aligned with three other pyramid formations or structures in such a way as to form a near-perfect equilateral triangle. Furthermore, the shadow of the BPOTS touches the apex of what is called the Pyramid of the Moon on precicely June 22, the Summer Solstice. Interesting "coincidences," or "not" -- what would you say? Compared to other pyramid complexes around the globe, these characteristics are highly similar.

The amount of evidence pointing towards artificiality being uncovered at these sites is astounding. It seems that everywhere they choose to excavate, something highly significant is being uncovered. Certainly there may be geological or other explanations for some of these anomalies, but the overwhelming, sheer amount of anomalous evidence increasingly places the burden on the skeptics to explain each one in turn.

Let us not forget to consider the bigger picture here. Gobekli Tepe temple--discovered in Turkey--is estimated to be between 12,000 to 9,500 years old and contains huge megalithic pillars of incredible majesty. History and science are constantly being rewritten, and always with a few, brave pioneers leading the way while everyone else kicks, screams, ridicules, and spits all sorts of venom and vitriol. The most disgusting thing to come of this so far is that group of archaeologists previously cited in this thread that signed off on a statement saying that further exploration and excavation should be ceased. That is the last damn thing we should do, and such a position to take for a discipline based on inquiry and investigation is inexcusable. The next most disgusting thing to come of this is the ignorance I am seeing on this board. For all those interested in this matter, please watch the video posted above, and check out this comprehensive rebuttal that was also previously posted on this thread: irna.lautre.net... Make up your own minds.

I will close by pointing out that there are many possible implications here should this turn out to be what it is continually appearing to be--an artificial complex. We must always keep in mind the agendas and motivations of the people involved--on both sides--money, power, greed, ambition, ego, reputation, security, etc. How do these factors play into the response to these implications, and to the site in general? Several good comments have been posted in this regard.

This is a topic that will continue to generate interest and controversy for years to come. I will be keeping a close eye on any new developments. A couple of things to mention: I could not translate the main site for the foundation into English using my browser's translate function (link). Anyone have any luck getting some translations? There is a language barrier that is keeping us all from doing more research into this topic, yet no one has voiced this concern. Also, I would like to read the paper that was likely presented with the Carbon-14 results. I'll let you know if I find it, but from now on, how about we work together to inform each other with the common goal of finding out the truth, whatever it may be?

Thank you,
Maat

edit on 6-6-2011 by maatunidy because: Spelling, added link to page I can't translate
edit on 6-6-2011 by maatunidy because: grammar



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 06:01 AM
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reply to post by Kandinsky
 





reply to post by Arken One bad thread after another. There is no 'Bosnian pyramid.' Why don't you post a few images of the 'pyramid' to illustrate your OP? Why no links to the research that supports the existence of 'Bosnian pyramids?' Is it because the 'pyramids' are natural hills? Osmanagic hasn't a leg to stand on in his claims of pyramids.


The earth isn't round! Airplanes? Flying? RIDICULOUS!! Space travel? RIDICULOUS!!



When are you going to learn life is full of mysteries and possibilities, unknown hidden truths and undiscovered facts?
When a huge team like that works on something..... isn't it reasonable to assume they are on to something?

NO THEY ARE ALL CRAZY !! SDGJFSDKGJKDFGKDLFGJFGD troll



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 06:02 AM
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reply to post by Essan
 





Unfortunately even if the material really was found in situ and really is 10.35k old, it cannot be accepted as evidence because no proper archaeological excavation has been carried out. Just claiming you found something whilst digging around in the bedrock, close to the surface, is proof of absolutely nothing. Except perhaps the religious zeal of those involved in this scam.


WOW!! Thanks for the support sir! YES, we need more people like you in this world!



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 06:41 AM
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If they are real,then there is a lot of need for the media and PTB to keep this covered up,hence the naysayers and "Im going to prove them wrong" crowd to be up on their hind legs bleating out the altered truth.....if they are not real,it wont take long for real science to prove it.....Im at the point where if the PTB and mainstream media dont like something/someone,Im for it



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 08:12 AM
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I believe in yet undiscovered pyramids. I also believe in high civilization more than 10 000 years ago. But I dont believe in the Bosnian Pyramids. If they weren't able to produce evidence in the last 10+ years, why should they be able to show us evidence now?



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 08:14 AM
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There are already threads about Osmanagic's hillocks. And the finding of some 10,000 year old organic substance in the excavation is not surprising. *Any* organic material (tree roots, branches, dead animals) would pretty much date to a time corresponding to how far below the topsoil you've dug.

This new evidence is like walking into a grocery store and finding carrots that are three days old. It isn't a surprise to anyone except someone who doesn't actually know what carbon dating is for.

There are no pyramids there. Osmanagic is carving stuff out of the hillside and passing it off as an archaelogical find. Until there are carved blocks found, or inscriptions or artifacts of archeological significance, he's excavating a hill.



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 08:15 AM
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Originally posted by bhornbuckle75
It would seem to me that he was factually correct. There are no Bosnian Pyramids...only some "so called" pyramids that are actually natural structures....whether or not that is true, I suppose will be argued, but the fact remains...you tried to embarrassed him with an article that essentially backs up what he said....In other words the only one you embarrassed was yourself.

I was supporting Kandinsky's position, not that of the OP. Sorry if that was unclear.
And just cuz I'm here...I would remind posters that C14 dating is now considered accurate to 50 kya, but one date is no date and context is everything.

Also, a reminder that Academe is not in the business of suppressing paradigm shattering discoveries...it merely demands a high standard of proof. Conspiracy theorists have this vision of Departments of Archaeology being adverse to new lines of investigation. Now excepting scenarios like Biblical Archaeology where every shovel full of dirt may threaten middle eastern land claims and the like, universities are full of grad students who are actively seeking the site that will make them their names. That's how it works. Are grants apportioned out for some of the more far-fetched claims? Maybe not as readily unless a really compelling case is made. Now to change that, you need to consult your representatives and convince them to put more of your tax dollars into educational institutions for archaeological investigation. It may require a tax raise...are you ready for that?

But to slam a debunking of bad science as just another example of suppression is lame, tiresome, and quite frankly, the last refuge of proponents with nothing better to offer.



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 08:17 AM
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reply to post by AboveTheTrees
 


Star for AboveTheTrees!



Geology level: it's been several times documented how ancient tribes used orographical accidents to build structures upon or through. Those could easily be pyramids-like mountains, covered with pathways and tunneled. But that doesnt' make them a pyramid at all and would be still far away from the engeneering complexity of erecting a pyramid.


This is what I was thinking, even shaping the hill to some degree to alter it's appearrance, then adding as you say tunnels etc. Sort of like Newgrange in Ireland, which is around 5000 years old, and took a workforce of around 300 people about 20 years to build. The hill itself presented the basic shape and the site was chosen because of this.





I think it would be naive to call it at this point. But if I had to venture a guess I would be inclined to think more along the lines of Newgrange, than an actual pyramid. Of course I'll be massively dissapointed if it turns out to be just a big hill.




posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 08:39 AM
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Originally posted by Kandinsky
reply to post by Arken
 
One bad thread after another.


There is no 'Bosnian pyramid.'

Why don't you post a few images of the 'pyramid' to illustrate your OP? Why no links to the research that supports the existence of 'Bosnian pyramids?'

Is it because the 'pyramids' are natural hills? Osmanagic hasn't a leg to stand on in his claims of pyramids.



So, your of the notion that there were no advanced civilization on earth before ours? Read your history. The church went through great lengths to 'destroy' records of the advances civilization to further the story of Jesus and the story that we were nothing but loosely organized tribes before religion 'organized' and 'enlightened' man kind. True, I think mankind was reduced to tribal life after a great catastrophe many thousands of years ago (probably where we will end up when the global event occurs) but to say, worse, believe, that we did not get organized until Christian religion came around is short-sighted to say the least.



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 08:46 AM
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Originally posted by jimnuggits

Whole reputations, and by extention, institutions, would and could be discredited overnight.

Grant money goes to the most confident, not the most innovative.

No one with 'academic credentials' would think twice about refuting whatever 'Sam' finds, because the alternative, also known as real scientific enquiry, would spell the end to their meal ticket.

So, same with most other things, follow the money. It dirties all waters.


Whose, by name, reputation would be hurt by the finding of a new culture? Name names please. Name the institutions that would be 'discredited' and why.

Name the people and institutions discredited by the finding of the Hobbits, Denisovan man and the Moche civilization or finding that we have Neanderthal genes?

Why would finding a new culture "end peoples meal ticket", please show evidence that previous finds in archaeology of new cultures causes people to stop being paid. LOL

New finds cause more research, more books to be written, more money to come in. That is a fact, your opinion has no basis in reality, but having no evidence one sees this claim over and over again - so document it.....I'm open minded please provide the evidence to support your claims.



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 09:06 AM
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reply to post by wrkn4livn
 


It is you who needs to read your history, as no such event took place.

Read about the story of King David and Solomon, the Queen of Sheba, the Babylonian empire, the Akkadians and other mesopotamian cultures and the Pharoahs of Egypt. Where? In the Bible of course.

The church most certainly did not try to destroy evidence of past civilisations. You are horribly misinformed.

In fact, it was Christians along with muslims of the the day between about 800-1200 AD who attempted to bring the scientific wisdom of the ancient Greeks to light by translating those works (1). This had an effect on education for nearly a thousand years. Sadly, nowadays, almost everyone is ignorant of this stuff.

I once challenged a class of students to go to the library and get out actual copies of Euclid's elements, to write a short synopsis of one of the proofs and the introduction to the particular book they got out. Almost without exception they referred to the Wikipedia article and an online translation of Euclid's elements.

Another startling find was that these University educated mathematics students had great difficulty understanding the mathematics of Archimedes (circa 287 BC - 212 BC), i.e. mathematics of over 2000 years ago.

Yes, there were church scholars in the middle ages who opposed some of the ideas of the ancient Greeks, especially the ideas of the Greek philosophers. However, I am pretty sure there are plenty of modern philosophers, scientists and other academics who do the same today.

1: Lindberg, David C. (Ed.) Science in the Middle Ages. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1978.



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 09:14 AM
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Originally posted by XtraTL
The church most certainly did not try to destroy evidence of past civilisations. You are horribly misinformed.

You might want to investigate some of the Church's actions regarding New World civilisations.



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 09:29 AM
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reply to post by purplemer
 


The jury is not out; there are no reputable archeologists that support, or even have doubts about this site. As to why this matters, and to answer another's query in the thread in regards to why common sense cannot compete with the skills of a trained, and educated archeologist, take for example this: a man looks into the sky and sees the sun. And without the knowledge of astrophysics he might not ever know that this is a star, a nuclear engine, nor understand its life cycle, its influence on space and the earth, nor how other scientific disciplines might relate to it.

The untrained eye sees a mountain that looks like a pyramid, and does not have the knowledge of geology and history, of sociology and biology, in order to best understand what evidence lays before them. Then there's the whole notion of knowing how to retrieve that knowledge. If you think people just dig things up, that it isn't a very complex process of data retrieval, you'd be mistaken.





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