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Amazing 5.6k Saturn Cassini Photographic Animation - No CGI no 3D

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posted on Jun, 5 2011 @ 09:11 AM
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"Stephen V2" created this amazing video using thousands of layers of photographs from the Cassini probe and a part of a film project called "outside in"....:
""outside in" is a ground-breaking non-profit IMAX™ giant screen film currently in production
animated from hundreds of thousands of still photographs"


Direct link to Vimeo video of the first two minutes

Also visible on Youtube:



Be sure to watch it at 1080HD and full screen!

Enjoy!




posted on Jun, 5 2011 @ 09:26 AM
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Mind Blown

Thats a perfect video for watchin after I 'walked the dog' this morning. Thank you much for posting it. Very cool.

So is this Cassini's actual flight path then? If so, thats some amazing piloting by NASA.



posted on Jun, 5 2011 @ 09:28 AM
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Very nice. This mission is one of NASA's most successful, and these missions should be replicated for planets and major moons which are not covered as fully. If NASA had the respect of the American public that it deserves, their finances would not be hurting and their missions would be many times their present size and scope. Thanks for the thread!



posted on Jun, 5 2011 @ 09:40 AM
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This is not "actual footage", it is a CGI duplication if anything. It's kind of silly actually. If you're into Astronomy most of your life, you know right away when you're seeing real images or not, at least I do. It's visually well done, but this isn't the real view NASA & other agencies see. Saturn is a busy place, and worshiped by the elite.

There's some real images in this video from Cassini...

edit on 5-6-2011 by JibbyJedi because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 5 2011 @ 10:26 AM
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To me the Saturnian System (Yes it is referred to as the Saturnian system, I just thought I'd enter that in a Dogpile search and the Saturn planetary system is indeed called the Saturnian System) to me is the most fascinating planetary system in our solar system. The myriad of lunar specimens is matched by no other planet in the solar system let alone it's magnificent ring system. I'd like to share a little NASA video of the ongoing mapping of the amazing Moon Titan, the only moon in the solar system with tectonic activity, in fact the only other body besides Earth to be tectonically active.(1)

Beneith the heavy atmosphere of the moon Titan (my own title)

The second largest gas giant is twice as far away from the sun as Jupiter is and it is the fastest spinning planet in the solar system. At the equator Saturn's 236,617 mile circumference (2 I took out the .2 miles from the figure because how can we be so sure measuring gas?) makes a revolution in just 10 hours and 47 minutes (3). Saturn is the only planet that would float in water. (4)

Of the over 60 moons of Saturn 4 such 'Trojan Moons' (5) share the same orbital path of two of Saturn,s moons. The Norse (or Phoebe) group consists of 29 retrograde outer moons. Janus and Epimetheus have orbits with only a few kilometers difference in semi-major axis, close enough that they would collide if they attempted to pass each other. Instead of colliding, however, their gravitational interaction causes them to swap orbits every four years. (6)

Finally the rings of Saturn appear so opaque but indeed are composed of tiny 'moonlets' and dust as small as pebbles but are sparse enough that NASA decided to steer Cassini right through em! I find that fascinating. Of course the amazing rings of Saturn up close.



A higher resolution available here.

P.S., now the most beautiful image to date of Saturn and it's amazing 'atmosphere'.



It is amazing not just in beauty, but near that reddish streak in the outer rings is the image of EARTH!



posted on Jun, 5 2011 @ 10:33 AM
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Originally posted by JibbyJedi
This is not "actual footage", it is a CGI duplication if anything. It's kind of silly actually. If you're into Astronomy most of your life, you know right away when you're seeing real images or not, at least I do. It's visually well done, but this isn't the real view NASA & other agencies see.

Many thanks for your input!


Here's a quote from the author from the link I gave above:


I'm very excited to present the first test from "Outside In" that actually represents real footage in progress from the film. Camera moves are still being tweaked and this is cropped version as IMAX-sized stuff does not play well online. But thanks to the new version of Adobe After Effects, "Outside In" can be made as I have always envisioned. Much thanks to everyone who has supported and contributed to this. This is the beginning, just a taste of incredible things to come. This is fly-through of this photograph - photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/​catalog/​PIA11141 - only a little brightness and contrast has been made to balance the moons with saturn's body. Do note that several thousand layers of many Cassini photographs were animated to make the fly-through work without any 3D CGI. The saturation is off due to lack of Flash Player ICM support.

So yes, Adobe After Effects have been used, but only to create the animation.
No modifications have been made to the original pictures, except brightness and contrast.

reply to post by Illustronic
 

Star for your very informative post!



posted on Jun, 5 2011 @ 10:46 AM
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reply to post by JibbyJedi
 


They say it on their site:


Using hundreds of thousands of still images manipulated to create full motion, using “2.75D” photographic fly-through technology. The film will be presented in IMAX quality 5.6K resolution on massive screens and concert-level surround systems to audiences in giant screen institutions, IMAX theaters, planetariums, museums and select 4k digital cinemas.


The images were "manipulated to create full motion", meaning that they created the "in between" frames to make the animation flow smoothly. They probably created their own images based on the original ones, Cassini photos do not have enough resolution for an IMAX image (they are only 1024 x 1024 images).



posted on Jun, 5 2011 @ 10:51 AM
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reply to post by elevenaugust
 


A "fly-through" with changes in perspective without adding other images?

I doubt that.



posted on Jun, 5 2011 @ 11:02 AM
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Thanks --the images are amazing
Here's something a little different

cosmiclog.msnbc.msn.com...


NASA's Cassini spacecraft has been snapping stunning pictures of Saturn and its moons since 2004, allowing scientists to probe the ringed planet and its spheres like never before.

Now, Chris Abbas, a designer and director at Digital Kitchen in Seattle, Wash., has grabbed hundreds of the images and compiled them into this mesmerizing video set to music by Nine Inch Nails. Rings spin, the planet floats, stars and moons whizz by.



posted on Jun, 5 2011 @ 11:08 AM
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Images were enhanced from real Cassini data to fulfill the image quality of iMAX and pieced together in image averaging for better flow but the source is still Cassini data, which isn't in color anyway! We have a way of assigning the electromagnetic wavelength signatures to the corresponding visual wavelengths we can see, what is really recorded and transmitted is beyond our visual spectrum. This kind of photographic imaging is over 100 years old, only different, but the same.



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 06:17 AM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
reply to post by elevenaugust
 


A "fly-through" with changes in perspective without adding other images?

I doubt that.
I'm not sure what you mean by changes in perspective.

If any footage was from a perspective other than that of Cassini then obviously it's not Cassini imagery.

However Cassini has multiple perspectives over time, so if all the images are enhanced versions of what Cassini saw, a change in perspective can be created by subtracting images (just editing out the boring parts of the fly through), right? They don't have to add any images, but apparently they are doing some enhancement to the resolution.

I would have liked to have seen some of the individual pieces making up the rings when it flew through the rings, but perhaps they are too small to resolve with that camera/lens combination, even flying through the rings.

Also, this looks very familiar too me, this thread is a duplicate. There is an existing thread on this topic posted March 25 here which I found with the ATS search "cassini animation saturn fly-by":

www.abovetopsecret.com...
That was the second thread listed, this thread was the first, in the search results. However I do commend the thread titling skills of the author of this thread as superior to the skills of the forum moderator who didn't choose as good a title for the first thread, by the measure of being able to look at the title and tell what the thread is about. So when people choose titles for their threads that aren't very descriptive, and people can't find them in a search, I'm not surprised they are duplicated. I like the title of this thread better, it tells me what the thread is actually about!



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 02:57 PM
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Originally posted by Arbitrageur
'm not sure what you mean by changes in perspective.
If what he says here ...

This is fly-through of this photograph – photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11141 – only a little brightness and contrast has been made to balance the moons with saturn’s body.
... is true, then how can that explain that it goes from this

to this?

How can that satellite be first in one position and then in a different position, in front of the rings?

And then it goes back...

... and the "camera" passes to the other side of the rings.


Cassini took thousands of photos, but they are not as close (in time) to each other to make an animation, they would need "in between" frames to make a smooth animation.

But if they only used one photo then they can change the zoom in and out and "scroll" (sorry for the lack of technical terms, I never know what to call those camera movements
) all over the photo, but they cannot change that photo's perspective.

I hope that explains better my point of view.



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 03:08 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
... and the "camera" passes to the other side of the rings.

I hope that explains better my point of view.
It doesn't help much for me to understand what you see as a problem, I'm not seeing the problem.

I don't see why Cassini can't do everything you describe. The only thing that puzzled me at first, was why it looked like it flew through the rings. I looked it up and, it actually did fly through the rings, as I posted some information about in the original thread.



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 03:12 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 

Here's what he said about the second video named "New "Outside In" clip teaser"...


A very short excerpt of new actual footage from "Outside In". This clip is created entirely from still photographs taken by the Cassini spacecraft - no CGI, no 3D models, textures etc. This is a 1080p HD file down-rezzed from a 5600 x 4200 32-bit color (5.6k) master file.

This is a fly-through of the Equinox photograph taken by Cassini last year.

Very large photo-mosaics from talented folks at Unmanned Spaceflight forums as well as ring mosaics created by me make this possible when combined with various animation techniques. Created in Adobe Photoshop and After Effects. Work at this resolution has been impossible until the new 64-bit version of After Effects.


Sort of ambiguous as he said that he used several photographs and then that he also used Photoshop, After Effects.... with no CGI/3D and no manipulations!?

Anyway, do we know exactly how many photographs were taken while the probe was approaching Saturn? And what is the interval time between them?

Edit to add: here's what they said on this page:


Using hundreds of thousands of still images manipulated to create full motion, using “2.75D” photographic fly-through technology.


But were do these "hundreds of thousands" still image came from?

This is not clear...
edit on 6-6-2011 by elevenaugust because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 03:28 PM
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Originally posted by elevenaugust
But were do these "hundreds of thousands" still image came from?

This is not clear...
Do you have some reason to think they're not from Cassini? He says they're from Cassini and I see no reason to doubt it.

@ArMaP, does this help?
saturn.jpl.nasa.gov...


Why does the image look sideways or upside down?

When a photographer tilts his or her camera to best fit the scene, the resulting images may appear sideways or at an angle. The same is true for Cassini - the images reflect the orientation of the photographer, in this case the spacecraft. The images on this web page have not been processed in any way, so there is no guarantee that the images will consistently show North at the top of the frame.

Additionally, sometimes images are taken when another instrument or spacecraft subsystem controls the orientation. In this case, the scene may not be optimized for the imaging field of view, but represents a unique opportunity to capture an image.


edit on 6-6-2011 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 03:36 PM
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Originally posted by Arbitrageur
Do you have some reason to think they're not from Cassini?

No, but I would like to see all the original photographs from it to confirm what they said.... or not.
Armap asked good questions and IMO it worth a verification, don't you think so?



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 03:44 PM
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Originally posted by elevenaugust
No, but I would like to see all the original photographs from it to confirm what they said.... or not.
Armap asked good questions and IMO it worth a verification, don't you think so?
As I said I didn't know how they flew through the rings, so I verified that and it actually flew through the rings! That's the only part I needed to verify, verifying the rest isn't on my list of priorities as I see nothing that would lead me to question it, so no, I still don't understand ArMaP's question, but if it's on your list of priorities, by all means, feel free to verify and post what you find.



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 05:53 PM
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So it said original Cassini images were from 5600 x 4200 32-bit color images (well that part is confusing), but anyway, 1080p is 1,920 pixels wide by 1,080 high, 12 bit color depth (from what I can find in a short brows) and varies from 24 to 60 frames per second. Looking up what the iMAX resolution actually is is even more ambiguous.

But going from the base numbers the Cassini images are cropped to the aspect ratio of the (still yet ambiguous) image format and frame rate, and color bit depth. Anybody versed in Photoshop will find filtering images over 8 bit color is limited, which the next step up is 16 bit, as well as save file formats, and this gets even more restricted at 32 bit color, and now CS5 has 64 bit color, (I've yet to load due to job related Adobe conflicts–could ruin my data).

The percentages just don't match up with this ambiguous 1080p, (why you will see 1080p24, 1080p32, 1080p50 and so on). I've read claims iMAX can be 6,120 × 4,500 actually discernible pixels. But again I haven't read all of the description of these numbers yet.



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 05:59 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


OK, I will try it again.


Look at this image (resized to fit the thread).

Source

You can see that it does look like the start of the animation.


But there's no way of changing that image into this...
... without changing the original image or using other images.

Not because of the rotation of Saturn, but because one of its satellites (the one on the left bottom corner in the original image) cannot appear in front of the rings just by zooming, rotating or panning the larger image.

Is it better this time?



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 06:22 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


According to this this PDF for educational purposes, NASA says they did indeed fly through the rings of Saturn.



Well, in movies it seems like there are lots of space rocks and asteroids ready to hit a spacecraft, but most of space is actually mostly empty when you are traveling through it. Even the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter is pretty empty because of the large distances between the asteroids. We are going to fly through the rings of Saturn, but we have chosen a spot in the rings that is should be pretty clear to fly through.


Ireally didn't look long but I really have no reason to believe they didn't fly through an outer ring.

I also found this from the ESA

It states only that, 1 July 2004 - Crossing of Saturn's ring plane during the spacecraft's critical Saturn Orbit Insertion (SOI) sequence. This could be where those ring splicing images came from.



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