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Man-Made Disasters On Now on Nat Geo Channel!

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posted on Jun, 4 2011 @ 10:17 PM
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Could we be the cause of all the natural disasters going on and increasing ?

No,not HAARP,or global-warming,but by other means.

For example,a large earthquake in China caused by the pressure of water
by a huge dam built.

Many other theories,but give me an hour our so to watch the show and do some research

.

Man-made earthquakes? Tornadoes caused by U.S. cities? Volcanoes activated by humans? NGC examines how efforts to harness natural resources can trigger natural disasters. Watch how a Chinese dam weighing as much as 3,000 Empire State Buildings caused tremors that claimed the lives of 90,000 people. Witness how another dam could trigger mudslides that bury millions. Investigate how growing urban areas can cause tornadoes and how mining and drilling have activated deadly mud volcanoes. Read more: channel.nationalgeographic.com...


channel.nationalgeographic.com...
edit on 4-6-2011 by kdog1982 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 4 2011 @ 10:29 PM
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Thank you for sharing this show, it looks very interesting and I am looking forward to watching it. I have been wondering about this exact subject; if humans do affect the planet and if something like a very large dam in China could cause unforeseen problems.



posted on Jun, 4 2011 @ 10:47 PM
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They are talking about coal mines in Australia causing earthquakes also.
Very informative.



posted on Jun, 4 2011 @ 10:56 PM
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Could drilling for gas and oil be the cause of the largest mud volcano on the planet?
The company responsible for the drilling contributes it to the earthquake.


Drilling[6][7][8] or an earthquake[9][10] may have resulted in the Sidoarjo mud flow on May 29, 2006, in the Porong subdistrict of East Java province, Indonesia. The mud covered about 440 hectares, 1,087 acres (4.40 km2) (2.73mi^2), and inundated four villages, homes, roads, rice fields, and factories, displacing about 24,000 people and killing 14. The gas exploration company involved was operated by PT Lapindo Brantas and the earthquake that may have triggered the Mud Volcano was the Yogyakarta earthquake of May 27, 2006. In 2008, it was termed the world's largest mud volcano and is beginning to show signs of catastrophic collapse, according to geologists who have been monitoring it and the surrounding area. A catastrophic collapse could sag the vent and surrounding area by up to 150 metres (490 ft) in the next decade. In March 2008, the scientists observed drops of up to 3 metres (9.8 ft) in one night. Most of the subsidence in the area around the volcano is more gradual, at around 0.1 centimetres (0.039 in) per day. A study by a group of Indonesian geo-scientists led by Bambang Istadi predicted the area affected by the mudflow over a ten year period.[11] More recent studies carried out in 2011 predict that the mud will flow for another 20 years, or even longer. [12] Now named Lusi – a contraction of Lumpur Sidoarjo, where lumpur is the Indonesian word for "mud" – the mud volcano appears to be a hydrocarbon/hydrothermal hybrid.



posted on Jun, 4 2011 @ 11:39 PM
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Don't forget geothermal power.


On December 8, 2006, Markus Häring caused some 30 earthquakes -- the largest registering 3.4 on the Richter scale -- in Basel, Switzerland. Häring is not a supervillain.

He's a geologist, and he had nothing but good intentions when he injected high-pressure water into rocks three miles below the surface, attempting to generate electricity through a process called enhanced geothermal.

But he produced earthquakes instead, and when seismic analysis confirmed that the quakes were centered near the drilling site, city officials charged him with $9 million worth of damage to buildings.
a



posted on Jun, 5 2011 @ 12:34 AM
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Originally posted by boncho
Don't forget geothermal power.


On December 8, 2006, Markus Häring caused some 30 earthquakes -- the largest registering 3.4 on the Richter scale -- in Basel, Switzerland. Häring is not a supervillain.

He's a geologist, and he had nothing but good intentions when he injected high-pressure water into rocks three miles below the surface, attempting to generate electricity through a process called enhanced geothermal.

But he produced earthquakes instead, and when seismic analysis confirmed that the quakes were centered near the drilling site, city officials charged him with $9 million worth of damage to buildings.
a

Thank you for that info and link!
You would think they would learn from history that fracking could cause the same effect.







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