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Two New Elements Join the Periodic Table

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posted on Jun, 4 2011 @ 12:17 PM
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On Wednesday, two new elements were officially welcomed to the periodic table.

The newcomers are elements 114 and 116, and they’ve just passed a three-year deliberation by the Joint Working Party on Discovery of Elements, a team of chemists and other scientists who sort through the evidence behind claims of newly discovered elements. These two don’t have official names yet, and for now they are going by the placeholders ununquadium and ununhexium, which refer to the number of protons in their nuclei.


Two New Elements Join the Periodic Table

In case you're wondering, element 115 is ununpentium. It's amazing that science is continuing to find more elements, more animals, more plants in a world that is growing smaller and smaller every day!

/TOA




posted on Jun, 4 2011 @ 07:34 PM
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To be fair, it's not finding elements, so much as making them, and actually seeing them before they decay. There is theoretically an area of the periodic table that is stable, that might be reached soon(ish) however these new elements are short lived and a few atoms at most



posted on Jun, 4 2011 @ 07:38 PM
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reply to post by Noinden
 


True enough. But no less exciting!

Second verse, same as the first!

/TOA



posted on Jun, 4 2011 @ 08:13 PM
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Must have been confirmed by watching the release of "a whole bunch of stuff" at #ushima.



posted on Jun, 4 2011 @ 08:40 PM
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reply to post by The Old American
 


Sorry I am just a chemistry PhD who worked in the Pharma industry (re skilling as a Bioinformatician) and I get antsy when people are almost right but not quite



posted on Jun, 4 2011 @ 09:07 PM
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Originally posted by BobAthome
Must have been confirmed by watching the release of "a whole bunch of stuff" at #ushima.



Doubtful, considering that I've had these elements on my periodic table for a while now.

Ununquadium was disviered in the late 90's and ununhexium in 2000. They're names have changed once or twice, but they've been known of and included in the periodic table for a little while now.

The newest one, to my knowledge, is ununseptium, which was included around about 2009.
edit on 4-6-2011 by hypervalentiodine because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 4 2011 @ 11:07 PM
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reply to post by hypervalentiodine
 


Ok,, as an expert in "elements" and their interaction , when released or bonded together,, would fukushima's confirmed meltdown cause the release of "intermittent" flash's of a "white incadecent" momentary flash of energy?

Curious.

Me



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 02:57 AM
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Originally posted by BobAthome
reply to post by hypervalentiodine
 


Ok,, as an expert in "elements" and their interaction , when released or bonded together,, would fukushima's confirmed meltdown cause the release of "intermittent" flash's of a "white incadecent" momentary flash of energy?

Curious.

Me


This is starting to stray off topic, so how about you start a thread on it. Although I won't promise I'll contribute to it, since it's not really my area of chemistry.



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 10:47 AM
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reply to post by hypervalentiodine
 


Was just curious about strange "firefly" type bursts of white light, while watching fukushima web cam, nothing actually confirmed, but other cam watchers have noted this as well.
thnks.



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 12:12 PM
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Wasn't ununpentium (element 115) the one that Bob Lazar was talking about?

Edit: Ah, the article says element 114 and 116.
edit on 6-6-2011 by RSF77 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2011 @ 02:14 PM
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reply to post by Noinden
 


As time appears to be relative, and the complete understanding of Space-Time is incomplete at best.... doesn't it seem irrelevant to point out half life or decay as long as the elemental structure was observed?



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