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Hiring in U.S. Slowed in May With 54,000 Jobs Added

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posted on Jun, 3 2011 @ 10:34 AM
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reply to post by Eurisko2012
 




The way i see it, if the USA is going to soar out of this recession then it would be a
good idea if California leads the way.
I don't see that happening with Socialists running California.


Ca. is a disaster..the drain of brains and money from that state to more friendly states is enormous. But can you imagine having Pelosi, Boxer, Feinstein, Ahnald, etc, making major decisions for you?:shk:




posted on Jun, 3 2011 @ 10:52 AM
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Originally posted by starwarsisreal
Swells since this is a problem should I go to college? Right now as a high schooler I'm currently thinking about what to do in the future since alot of my teachers are preaching and my parents say that college will save me


I personally know three recent grads who are working as interns in china. As much as I hate to say it, I think you should look into it. One majored in bldg. Science, one technical direction for theatre, and one is teaching English. There seems to be opportunities there currently, and from what i have been told, the Chinese treat them like very very well. Not sure how long this will last, but you are young enough to take advantage of this opportunity.

Btw. They have all used this as an opportunity to learn the Chinese language as well. I assume they will all be ok, if and when they return to the states, as far as employment is concerned.



posted on Jun, 3 2011 @ 11:49 AM
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Originally posted by princeofpeace
Get a job in technology...working with computers. When the Chinese take us over you will be all set.


not unless you speak Mandarin and
will work for $5.00 a day for 12 hrs
a day, 7 days a week.

weekly pay: $35.00 gross

They have no labor unions in China.
Basically, It's slave labor



posted on Jun, 5 2011 @ 09:48 AM
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reply to post by starwarsisreal
 


I am a college professor in the social sciences. If you elect to go to college, stay far, far away from liberal arts educations unless you're going into a 'hard' science (microbiology, etc., or some math related fields....some types of engineering, for example). Social science degrees are becoming useless, and within 10 years all these people currently in process for Bachelor's degrees in communications, psych, sociology, anthropology, etc. are going to hit a very brutal brick wall. I teach at a comm. college/tech school now because I saw the writing on the wall for the 4-year universities (they're profit centers, not places of education, and thus they don't tell their students the hard facts about their majors).

As I've told my own children, go with a tech degree. Learn to be a plumber, an electrician, a mechanic, or a skilled builder.....skills that cannot be outsourced and even in the most dire of circumstances will be in demand. Yes, there are gluts in these fields as well, so you won't make as much as you might have 10 years ago, but you'll be able to at least earn a livable wage and have some semblance of job security. Most 4-year degrees are all but useless now and unless you're planning on going into one of the aforementioned 'hard' science fields and get a Ph.D., you're wasting your time and money and you're going to get out to a bad job market with a huge amount of debt hanging over your head.

While I certainly enjoy what I do, many days I wish I had listened to my grandfather who, when I was about 16, gave me the same advice I'm giving to you. He worked his entire life building water treatment plants and retired extremely wealthy. My uncle owns my grandfather's company now and while the big municipal projects are few and far between now, he makes a very comfortable living working his own hours doing minor but always needed infrastructure repair.

Your guidance counselors aren't intentionally misleading you, at least not in most cases, but you have to remember that these people are heavily invested in a system that created their job and many of them don't have a lot of 'real world' contact once they get secure in those academic positions.



posted on Jun, 8 2011 @ 10:18 AM
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Originally posted by samcrow
reply to post by starwarsisreal
 


I am a college professor in the social sciences. If you elect to go to college, stay far, far away from liberal arts educations unless you're going into a 'hard' science (microbiology, etc., or some math related fields....some types of engineering, for example). Social science degrees are becoming useless, and within 10 years all these people currently in process for Bachelor's degrees in communications, psych, sociology, anthropology, etc. are going to hit a very brutal brick wall. I teach at a comm. college/tech school now because I saw the writing on the wall for the 4-year universities (they're profit centers, not places of education, and thus they don't tell their students the hard facts about their majors).

As I've told my own children, go with a tech degree. Learn to be a plumber, an electrician, a mechanic, or a skilled builder.....skills that cannot be outsourced and even in the most dire of circumstances will be in demand. Yes, there are gluts in these fields as well, so you won't make as much as you might have 10 years ago, but you'll be able to at least earn a livable wage and have some semblance of job security. Most 4-year degrees are all but useless now and unless you're planning on going into one of the aforementioned 'hard' science fields and get a Ph.D., you're wasting your time and money and you're going to get out to a bad job market with a huge amount of debt hanging over your head.

While I certainly enjoy what I do, many days I wish I had listened to my grandfather who, when I was about 16, gave me the same advice I'm giving to you. He worked his entire life building water treatment plants and retired extremely wealthy. My uncle owns my grandfather's company now and while the big municipal projects are few and far between now, he makes a very comfortable living working his own hours doing minor but always needed infrastructure repair.

Your guidance counselors aren't intentionally misleading you, at least not in most cases, but you have to remember that these people are heavily invested in a system that created their job and many of them don't have a lot of 'real world' contact once they get secure in those academic positions.


That's good advice. I would add - follow your passion -.
Choose a career path position that you would enjoy driving to work in the morning.



posted on Jun, 8 2011 @ 10:28 AM
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Originally posted by Wetpaint72

Originally posted by starwarsisreal
Swells since this is a problem should I go to college? Right now as a high schooler I'm currently thinking about what to do in the future since alot of my teachers are preaching and my parents say that college will save me


I personally know three recent grads who are working as interns in china. As much as I hate to say it, I think you should look into it. One majored in bldg. Science, one technical direction for theatre, and one is teaching English. There seems to be opportunities there currently, and from what i have been told, the Chinese treat them like very very well. Not sure how long this will last, but you are young enough to take advantage of this opportunity.

Btw. They have all used this as an opportunity to learn the Chinese language as well. I assume they will all be ok, if and when they return to the states, as far as employment is concerned.


Yep my son is taking chinese...smartest thing he's ever done



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