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1 of the moving stars I observed is called SPICA*******Moving stars update.

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posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 09:27 AM
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[color=gold]Has anyone who observed these moving Stars been seeing SPICA as well or something different?

Also I see its binary but it moves left to right up and down in reasonable distance. Have you been seen this or another? I post this so if any see these movers they can help locate better atleast this 1 that I see.

Hello ATS I have posted before about Stars that appear to be moving and twinkle different colors. After a few months I think I found the correct star or stars. I was checking and I believe its called SPICA. Below is a previous thread I started asking what star it was and many added what they thought. Arcturus was mentioned and is close but Spica fits location data better.

Previous thread link (below) asking about Star I seen that appears to move.
www.abovetopsecret.com...

Some Data on Spica
Spica (α Vir, α Virginis, Alpha Virginis) is the brightest star in the constellation Virgo, and the 15th brightest star in the nighttime sky. It is 260 light years distant from Earth. A blue giant, it is a variable of the Beta Cephei type.




edit on 6/1/11 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 09:29 AM
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reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 


ive noticed those stars all my life . what else is new?



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 09:29 AM
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Spica is a close binary star whose components orbit about each other every four days. They remain sufficiently close together that they can not be resolved as individual stars through a telescope. The changes in the orbital motion of this pair results in a Doppler shift in the absorption lines of their respective spectra, making them a double-lined spectroscopic binary.[6] Initially, the orbital parameters for this system were inferred using spectroscopic measurements. Between 1966 and 1970, the Narrabri interferometer was used to observe the pair, and to directly measure the orbital characteristics and the angular diameter of the primary. The latter was determined to be (0.90 ± 0.04) × 10−3 arcseconds, while the angular size of the semimajor axis of the orbit was found to be only slightly larger at (1.54 ± 0.05) × 10−3 arcseconds.[5]

The primary star has a stellar classification of B1 III-IV. The luminosity class matches the spectrum of a star that is midway between a subgiant and a giant star, and it is no longer a B-type main sequence star.[2] This is a massive star with more than 10 times the mass of the Sun and seven times the Sun's radius. The total luminosity of this star is about 12,100 times that of the Sun, and eight times the luminosity of its companion. The primary is one of the nearest stars to the Sun that has sufficient mass to end its life in a Type II supernova explosion.[7]

The primary is classified as a Beta Cephei type variable star that varies in brightness over a 0.1738 day period. The spectrum shows a radial velocity variation with the same period, indicating that the surface of the star is regularly pulsating outward and then contracting. This star is rotating rapidly, with a rotational velocity of 199 km/s along the equator.[6]

The secondary member of this system is one of the few stars to display the Struve-Sahade Effect. This is an anomalous change in the strength of the spectral lines over the course of an orbit, where the lines become weaker as the star is moving away from the observer.[13] It may be caused by a strong stellar wind from the primary scattering the light from secondary when it is receding.[14] This star is smaller than the primary, with about 7 times the mass of the Sun and 3.6 times the Sun's radius.[6] Its stellar classification is B2 V, making this a main sequence star.[2]

Spica is a rotating ellipsoidal variable, which is a non-eclipsing close binary star system where the stars are mutually distorted through their gravitational interaction. This effect causes the apparent magnitude of the star system to vary by 0.03 over a time interval that matches the orbital period. This slight dip in magnitude is barely noticeable visually.[15] The rotation rates of both stars are faster than their mutual orbital period. This lack of synchronization and the high ellipticity of their orbit may indicate that this is a young star system. Over time, the mutual tidal interaction of the pair may lead to rotational synchronization and orbit circularization.[16]
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en.wikipedia.org...

[COLOR=GOLD] Is this 1 of the moving Stars some who are observing as well or are there others that are being seen? I ask because there are a couple that do this



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 11:38 AM
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Originally posted by Kaiuk
reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 


ive noticed those stars all my life . what else is new?


SPICA moves I never seen stars move... Have you?



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 02:13 PM
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I observe Spica routinely. It's one of the stars I use to align my telescope. I've never seen it "move" with respect to the other stars, and certainly not to such a degree that you could perceive it moving by eye.



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 03:04 PM
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Saturn, Arcturus, and Spica are pretty much the first thing I triangulate on every evening. I, like the other poster, haven't noticed any movement either.

I'll check again tonight. I have a program called "SkyView" on my phone, excellent app for anyone with an interest, btw.



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 03:08 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


Thank you its nice to see you have had personal observations of it. I do see it moving tho, and I try to do many types of standings to see if its just eye error or movement error on my behalf. Now that I know what it is when I am observing I will log into ATS and make a thread to see if others see. But my data came back as spica or 14h?
Thanks



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 03:10 PM
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reply to post by The GUT
 

I will be checking from another location tonight and onceI find it from new location I will post what I see and thanks for the app.



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 08:24 PM
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Originally posted by Ophiuchus 13
I do see it moving tho, and I try to do many types of standings to see if its just eye error or movement error on my behalf.
It moves, but you can't see it move.

So it's eye error of some sort.

There is a phenomenon known as autokinesis that makes it look like lights in the sky are moving when they're really not moving. My guess is that's what you're dealing with.

Do like ngchunter and lock into it with an equatorial mount and drive to track with the Earth's rotation and you won't see any movement. My telescope doesn't have an equatorial mount, so using my telescope, I see all the stars move with the Earth's rotation, with the exception of Polaris, that's the only star that doesn't appear to move. But the effect I'm seeing is the rotation of the Earth, not star movement. All stars move, but once you compensate for the Earth's rotation, they are typically too far away for us to see the movement with an amateur telescope.

The movement is so small in fact that in 3000 years, the positions of stars in the sky have changed only a little, but not much:
www.physics.csbsju.edu...

Are the constellations permanent?

Ancient astronomers often spoke of the "fixed stars," which maintained permanent positions in the sky. And, indeed, the stars do seem almost fixed in place; the patterns they form look much the same today as they did when the constellations were first named nearly 3000 years ago. But the stars are all moving relative to the Sun, most with speeds of many kilometers per second. Because they are so very far away, it will take thousands of lifetimes to see significant changes in the star patterns.



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 08:40 PM
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Yes, I've seen it move and the others you mention also. And if you carry your scientific investigations a bit further, you will find that ALL stars appear to move. Mostly, of course, the apparent movement you notice is because the Earth rotates. And stars to move more or less independently but you would never notice by staning out looking up. don't think to hard on the information I just gave you about the Earth rotating, you may get motion sickness when you realize that you are moving and the stars are virtually stationary.

Deny ignorance is the motto here, by the way.



posted on Jun, 2 2011 @ 02:47 AM
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Originally posted by Aliensun
Yes, I've seen it move and the others you mention also. And if you carry your scientific investigations a bit further, you will find that ALL stars appear to move. Mostly, of course, the apparent movement you notice is because the Earth rotates.
Yes except the movement of Polaris is so small it's hard to see any movement. Polaris is the star at the center of the arcs that seems to not be moving:

en.wikipedia.org...


A typical star trail with Polaris in the centre
I'm guessing that's a time exposure of about 30 minutes. I didn't measure the Arc but I know 15 degrees arc is 1 hour and that looks like something less than 15 degrees.
But if you want to get really precise about it, even Polaris appears to move, even though the movement doesn't really show up in that photo. It might show up better in a longer exposure, but even then it still doesn't even move 1 full degree, just a fraction of a degree.


Deny ignorance is the motto here, by the way.
Indeed.


Originally posted by Ophiuchus 13
Has anyone who observed these moving Stars been seeing SPICA as well or something different?
Hopefully after reading the replies in this thread, you will realize that neither you nor anyone else has seen any moving stars with the naked eye. You're seeing one of the following:
1. Autokinesis
2. The rotation of the Earth, or
3. If you see something moving, it's not a star. It may look like a star to you, but it's not a star.
Regarding #3, I thought your other thread was about satellites, since I thought everyone knows we can't see stars move.



posted on Jun, 2 2011 @ 02:57 AM
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The stars seem to move because the earth is moving

2nd




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