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18 Signs That Life In U.S. Public Schools Is Now Essentially Equivalent To Life In U.S. Prisons

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posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 07:14 AM
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This is the truculence, the arbitrariness, the state more and more invading people's lives. And there are people who think all this is normal. That do not understand the ways that we are following, and worst of all, do not see the destination to which these paths will lead us. Please, If you care about your kids , I'm sure this is not the future you expected for them. It's time to put a stop to it.


In the United States today, our public schools are not very good at educating our students, but they sure are great training grounds for learning how to live in a Big Brother police state control grid. Sadly, life in many U.S. public schools is now essentially equivalent to life in U.S. prisons. Most parents don't realize this, but our students have very few rights when they are in school.



The following are 18 signs that life in our public schools is now very similar to life in our prisons....

#1 Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli has announced that school officials can search the cell phones and laptops of public school students if there are "reasonable grounds for suspecting that the search will turn up evidence that the student has violated or is violating either the law or the rules of the school."

#2 It came out in court that one school district in Pennsylvania secretly recorded more than 66,000 images of students using webcams that were embedded in school-issued laptops that the students were using at home.

#3 If you can believe it, a "certified TSA official" was recently brought in to oversee student searches at the Santa Fe High School prom.

#4 A few years ago a class of 3rd grade students at one Kentucky elementary school were searched by a group of teachers after 5 dollars went missing. During the search the students were actually required to remove their shoes and their socks.

#5 At one public school in the Chicago area, children have been banned from bringing their lunches from home. Yes, you read that correctly. Students at that particular school are absolutely prohibited from bringing lunches from home. Instead, it is mandatory that they eat the food that the school cafeteria serves.

#6 The U.S. Department of Agriculture is spending huge amounts of money to install surveillance cameras in the cafeterias of public schools so that government control freaks can closely monitor what our children are eating.

#7 A teenager in suburban Dallas was recently forced to take on a part-time job after being ticketed for using bad language in one high school classroom. The original ticket was for $340, but additional fees have raised the total bill to $637.

#8 It is not just high school kids that are being ticketed by police. In Texas the crackdown extends all the way down to elementary school students. In fact, it has been reported that Texas police gave "1,000 tickets" to elementary school kids over a recent six year period.

#9 A few months ago, a 17 year-old honor student in North Carolina named Ashley Smithwick accidentally took her father's lunch with her to school. It contained a small paring knife which he would use to slice up apples. So what happened to this standout student when the school discovered this? The school suspended her for the rest of the year and the police charged her with a misdemeanor.

#10 A little over a year ago, a 6 year old girl in Florida was handcuffed and sent to a mental facility after throwing temper tantrums at her elementary school.


Read the full article in [endoftheamericandream.com...] with all the links that corroborate each of the topics covered.



You can make a difference and it starts at home.
edit on 1-6-2011 by RUSSO because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 07:19 AM
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Is Homeschooling a solution?



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 07:21 AM
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Originally posted by jrcris2011
Is Homeschooling a solution?


I think it's one of the solutions. It is a start. It is a "won battle". But surely not the end of the "war".



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 07:23 AM
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there's actually a startling difference.

prisioners with some effort can actually make a couple dollars.

now paying them student loans...



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 07:25 AM
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Originally posted by AnotherYOU
there's actually a startling difference.

prisioners with some effort can actually make a couple dollars.

now paying them student loans...


Quite ironic what happens in these days.

It would be funny if was not tragic. SFY
edit on 1-6-2011 by RUSSO because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 07:31 AM
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Amazing article.

Private or Charter Schooling is a hundred bajillion times better than Public schooling. Unfortunately the Democrats are nearly all against Vouchers and not enough Republicans will take a stand to push them through. Home schooling is a good answer but not every parent can do this... some parents aren't cut out to be teachers, others have to work. Then you have the after school programs and sports issues.



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 07:35 AM
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Home schooling is a solution, it also reinforces the parent model of one working parent and one stay at home parent, and the working parent need not be the man.

People will argue, "but your child isn't socialized" science museums have play areas where kids run around and have the equivalent of recess, which is the only time students are actually supposed to be socializing with each other at school, so that accounts for the socialization.

When kids are older, it will encourage them to take the GED when they are 16 as opposed to when they are 18. They could have a job and take college classes while their peers are still in high school.

Of course, that would be unfair for the students stuck in public education, right? And we should all gouge out our eyes because sight is unfair to the blind, right?
edit on 1-6-2011 by filosophia because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 07:41 AM
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Originally posted by jjkenobi
Amazing article.

Private or Charter Schooling is a hundred bajillion times better than Public schooling. Unfortunately the Democrats are nearly all against Vouchers and not enough Republicans will take a stand to push them through. Home schooling is a good answer but not every parent can do this... some parents aren't cut out to be teachers, others have to work. Then you have the after school programs and sports issues.



You are right. You know, thinking about it, I think it would be a good idea if parents organize themselves and maybe, create schools within their community, with parents regulating what is taught. It is kind of an anarchic thought but anything is better than we are experiencing today. Maybe a little silly I think this can be done. But all your suggestions are very welcome

edit on 1-6-2011 by RUSSO because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 07:47 AM
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I always new school was a crap system to educate children
infact most children just waste their lives in school to learn things
they will not need in the future.
Thanks to the so called "laws" you guys have a hard time bringing
your kids up, gl!



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 07:58 AM
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Originally posted by foreshadower99
I always new school was a crap system to educate children
infact most children just waste their lives in school to learn things
they will not need in the future.
Thanks to the so called "laws" you guys have a hard time bringing
your kids up, gl!


I'm not so radical to think that everything is wrong in public schools and that nothing is used by the young people there. But we should review some concepts that are already outdated and try to develop a better way to educate our kids. Leave everything in the hands of the state is just stupid.



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 08:02 AM
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reply to post by jrcris2011
 


I can advise you that unless you know what you are doing, do not home school kids. Because it will only be to their disadvantage. I see parents who think they are so smart - homeschooling their children because of some hippie-reasoning, with the result, 9/10 year olds who have trouble with adding numbers under 100.

So if you wish to home school your kids I can advise you to take a teaching course to at least understand a little more than just "PUBLIC SCHOOLS BAD! ME GOOD!"



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 08:14 AM
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Sadly I'm inclined to agree about the school system these days. My oldest just finished 6th grade and the way things are done now completely baffle me. The things that are implemented these days are quite disheartening from 'my' parental point of view. For example:

My oldest school is 6/7 grades only and they are separated by floors: 6 on first floor 7 on second floor
-if a student is caught on either floor they don't belong they are given detention
Grades are further broken down in what they call blocks, separated by color designation
-these blocks are all ran with completely different rulesets towards the children
-they were sold on the 'supposed' fact children are placed in a particular block according to their skills and throughout the year I've learned otherwise.
-these blocks all have different things going on in which you cannot participate unless you are within said color block. Some have had many field trips and other extra curricular activities through the year and others very few and others none.
-Blocks have different criteria on what children get in trouble for and how quickly. Some 3-4 'offenses' before detention, others only one, all in regards to the exact same type of 'offense'. (not getting homework turned in etc.)

Those are only a few of the things that I've completely disagreed with. Others are things like teachers telling the parents in the beginning for 'meet the teach night' all the things they WILL NOT do, rather than things they are going to do for the children. All things equated to me that essentially they don't do anything teaching related if they are not 'on the clock' period!

Then there's the unfortunate fact that even in 6/7 grades the 'hall monitors' are not other kids anymore but rather actual on duty police officers with gun, cuffs, nightsticks, the whole package. Also just to clarify, my children do not attend school in a more 'undesired' part of town, but rather one of the top if not best public school in the state. Its unfortunate that society has come to the point where things like this are the norm.

Because of those unfortunate facts and that I agree that children are subjected to a similarity of doing 5-10 in the penal system that I'm thankful in my state homeschooling is an option that I will be pursuing for my oldest. They are very lenient in regards to allowing the parent to home school and as a single parent working full time let me tell you that it's going to be a tremendous amount of work and time that I'm going to have to undertake but one I'm more than willing to do for the benefit of my children!



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 08:14 AM
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Originally posted by filosophia
Home schooling is a solution, it also reinforces the parent model of one working parent and one stay at home parent, and the working parent need not be the man.

People will argue, "but your child isn't socialized" science museums have play areas where kids run around and have the equivalent of recess, which is the only time students are actually supposed to be socializing with each other at school, so that accounts for the socialization.

When kids are older, it will encourage them to take the GED when they are 16 as opposed to when they are 18. They could have a job and take college classes while their peers are still in high school.

Of course, that would be unfair for the students stuck in public education, right? And we should all gouge out our eyes because sight is unfair to the blind, right?
edit on 1-6-2011 by filosophia because: (no reason given)


I actually was friends with a woman who home schooled her children during the day, and worked at night. It actually worked out very well for her family, as both parents were working and providing, but just doing it at different times is all. So it can be achieved. I actually taught all of my kids the basics before heading to Kindergarten, it was actually fun, and rewarding, and it paid off big time!

along with the can my kids be soicalized, this woman had home schooling groups, where the kids socialized as a group, and were taught at the same time, so that isn't really an issue. I personally would have home schooled, but the state I live in is so anal with everything, and the fees for doing it are ridiculous! Plus, you have to have a social worker come to your home every month, and I am sorry but I do not the Government in my home. This is one of the states that is against charter schools, unfortunately, even though they will admit it they need. The school system in Maine sucks big time! They don't teach your kids anything! Which is very sad!

Yet I do regret moving, in NH we had an awesome school, they were very particular with what they taught the students and they even had a curriculum, Maine's teachers do not even have to have a curriculum in their classroom, hell half of them forget to give the students homework each night. It's pathetic, but nothing I can do, because now we are stuck here with a house mortgage. Blah!



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 08:26 AM
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reply to post by filosophia
 


First off I would like to say thank you for the thread, it was an intresting read. Althrough #3 about the TSA agents never came about. the court ordered them to to attend but none did.

To reply to filosopha, children need to interact with other children. Home schooling is not a solution, althrough i do agree with it in principle it will cause more hame than good.

Children need to interact and play with each other. and this is the reason why; this is my 2000 word essay on why children interacting with each other is necessary. yes im a psychologist and yes I spend my days writing papers.

Harris (1998) and Pinker (2002) agree that the influence of parents on children has been over exaggerated and that it is within the peer group (other children) that socialization occurs.
There are two main types of interaction with children and one hybrid;
1. Complementary interaction is when a child interacts with a parent by asking for help and receiving it.
The main role in complementary interaction is to provide the child with security and protection to enable them to gain knowledge and skills.
2. Reciprocal process is when the child interacts with a peer (roughly the same age) of an equal level of knowledge and social power. It has been suggested that these reciprocal interactions are a way of children gaining social skills that they can only learn among equals.

3. Sibling relationships are a hybrid of both these theories (reciprocal and complementary). Among siblings there is thought to be a difference in knowledge and power that is not so great that the children (siblings) cannot play together and communicate at the same level.

It is argued that because siblings can interact as both reciprocal and complementary that the influence they hold between each other is greater than having either and this is because;

• The older child can act as a teacher, guide and role model for the younger sibling.
• Both children share interest and competence to a sufficient degree that they are able to tackle the task of social understanding jointly.

Before we go into peer to peer social interaction we must first address why it is so important compared to peer to care giver interaction (parents or guardians).
When children interact with caregiver(s), the caregiver usually use their own knowledge and experience to “scaffold” the interaction by interpreting their intentions or by reforming what the child says or does thus limiting the child’s ability to develop. In this instance the caregiver is not letting the child freely express himself instead the caregiver may be putting words in his/her mouth and not letting the child fully express him/herself before being cut off.
In simple terms, the caregivers pre-empt what the child is asking or looking for not letting the child fully express him/herself like she or he would have to, to another peer because both would be at the same power and knowledge level unlike a caregiver who would be able to ‘guess’ what the child wants.


The main underlying context in the Children’s Personal and Social Development hand book (chapter 3) is that peer to peer interactions is one of children learning social skills through playing together.
Each child when interacting with others has;
1. Their own agenda
2. Their own aspirations
3. Their own motives
With each child having his/her own “agenda” then there is obviously going to be conflicts while interacting with other children. While one side of this is that a child is going to be conflicting with others there is also the case to be made that after conflict come’s peace and this is achieved by children reconciling their differences with each other.


Children’s interactions with siblings.
Children’s interactions with siblings can be particularly intense Dunn and Kendrick (1982 pp210-11) explain because interactions with siblings are not emotionally neutral. The interactions can be categorised by;
• Pleasure
• Affection
• Hostility
• Aggression
• Jealously
• Rivalry
• Frustration
Dunn goes on to explain that although brothers and sisters may show dislike to their siblings i.e. “I hate my brother/sister” under that layer of emotion they have a deep seeded protection of their sibling. For example protecting them from school bullies.
This view of protecting their kin can be seen in Stalker and Connors (2004 p233) research on children and families with a disabled sibling.
This piece of research reflects and endorses the view that children are protective and caring of their siblings to the point of protecting them from negative reactions from other peers.
In my interpretation it shows a clear indication that children not only recognise their own emotional needs but that of their siblings also. It also shows that even though they may dislike or not agree with their siblings they still feel as if they have a protective duty over them.





Children playing (peer to peer) and how this is important for their development.
By taking one example of children playing together and studying the context we can see a multitude of different emotions and behaviours that show us just how much children learn from interacting with each other (playing). Children’s playing together is important because it is a form of socialisation and helps them develop for tasks in everyday life.
Fein 1984 (pp136-137) also available in Children’s Personal and Social Development handbook page 100-101 shows a transcript of two boys Peter and Michael both boys being just under 4 years old playing .
The game they are playing is “Dracula monster” which has a “monster vanishing hero” while using wooden toy blocks as weapons. We can deduce the children’s knowledge and agendas from this interaction by closely examining the transcript and looking for the meaning in words and how they interact.
• Imagination, this is shown in the context of the wooden toy bricks being used as weapons also because they are able to reinvent themselves as fantasy characters from science fiction novels and not simply good guy versus bad. The two main types of socio-dramatic play are;
1. Familiar themes such as parents , children or doctor patient
2. Fantasy play Is more creative and varied which allows children to work out their feelings about major life events such as threat and loss i.e. monsters vs. Dracula

• Good vs. Bad, from the context in which the children are playing is “Dracula monster” (bad) and “monster vanishing hero” (good) because of the words they use to describe what and who they are. This shows they have an understanding of good and bad, right and wrong.

• Leadership, dominance and confidence. Peter shows clear leadership and dominance as he approaches Michael and tells him “You be Dracula”. Peter did not ask Michael if he wanted to play but instead took charge and told Michael in basic terms you’re playing ‘Dracula’.

• Submissive, non-confrontational and compliance. Michael shows clear signs of being submissive to Peter. This is known because he accepts Peter’s invitation to play ‘Dracula’ without arguing over roles as to who plays ‘Dracula’ or ‘Dracula vanishing hero’. Another indication Michael is submissive is when Peter confronts him in an aggressive stance with a block and pushes his arm trying to provoke a reaction but Michael does not rise to this and instead agrees with Peter.

• The ability to reconcile differences. This is another point made when Peter and Michael are arguing over roles; while Michael is the submissive one in this scenario which could be put down to Peter’s ‘aggressiveness’ it could be argued that he is demonstrating the ability to reconcile their differences before the situation escalates into an argument.

• Team work, can be seen in this transcript also because they are playing together for the same goal of passing time, enjoyment and having fun with another peer.

As you can see from my interpretation of the transcript and reading over the notes provided in the hand book, children playing together (peer to peer) is indeed important for children’s social, personal and mental development because it reinforces roles and teaches children about their role in life, sharing experiences and how to overcome aggressive behaviour.
In conclusion to the transcript, although both children appear to have different personalities one being dominant and confident while the other is submissive and compliant its helps the children develop skills so they can interact with each other i.e. reconcile differences and co-operate so they can play and have fun.

Rough and tumble play (R&T) is not only subject to males but also females. Pellengrini, (2003, p. 1531) expresses that rough and tumble play is related to aggression in males, females on the other hand see it as playful. Females also engage in rough and tumble play with their male counterparts.
(Smith et al 1999) have suggested that even the negative aspects of children’s experiences such as dealing with aggression (such as in R&T) can be useful preparation for adult life. They also suggest the following reasons as to why rough and tumble play is so important for the development of social skills;
• The ability to understand body signs and signals (aggressive & submissive)
• The ability to display body signs and signals (aggressive & submissive)
• The ability to show restraint and regulate physical strength as to not hurt their peers while playing.
• The ability to share or take turns as being the good guy or bad.
• The ability to understand other peers point of views.
• To understand that too much physical violence may be seen as cheating and an understanding of the word.
Some researchers have noticed that during play fighting some children might take advantage of the situation by ‘cheating’ to display dominance. The child ‘cheats’ by intentionally hurting another peer, the other peer may be playing the bad person that sooner or later has to die and they accept this lesser role and have consented to play it. After being caught and assuming that during the rough and tumble aspect of being caught, another child takes advantage of his consent to actually cause harm to the ‘bad guy’ gaining himself the title of a ‘cheater’ because he took advantage of the ‘bad guy’.



(Fein, 1981, Humphreys and Smith 1987, Pellengrini 1985 1988)
These researchers have suggested that rough and tumble playing between adolescent males is related to physical aggression and may be used as a way to establish peer status in the form of dominance.
(Peer and sibling interaction)
Peer interaction in the school setting. (Learning)
Where children are taught in peer groups such as what happens in schools (small groups of five children work towards an assignment) this is teaching the children social skills which are helping them develop because:
The ability to work on projects with peers is extremely important. “There is evidence that the resulting of conflicting perspectives and the joint development of ideas is important in learning and intellectual development”. Littleton 2004
The view of peer collaboration and learning is echoed by Brownell and Carriger, that children as young as three years old can collaborate to solve simple problems and in doing so able to establish goals.

In conclusion, I have mainly focused on playing to show how important peer to peer interaction is in the development of a child’s social and personal skills. I have chosen this because it is when the child has the least interaction from a caregiver and to give me a sense of just how much development goes on while playing.
The child during play can use all of his/her emotions; it can also teach them new emotions as well as enforce others. During peer to peer play it also reinforces the child’s personality and how the world perceives him/her, this can be through body signals such as aggressive or withdrawing from aggressive behaviour and becoming submissive.
Although during play most of ours skills in interaction are being used we have to remember that not all skills come from play. Most parents would instil values in their children before allowing them to interact with others i.e. sharing, not to be aggressive and to care for our friends, (peers) it could be said that children are only reinforcing their taught values during play.

Michael McClenaghan 2011





Bibliography:
• Dunn, J. and Kendrick, C. (1982) siblings: love, envy and understanding, London Grant McIntyre Ltd.
• Fein, G.G. (1984) ‘The self-building potential of pretend play or “I got a fish, all by myself”’, in Yawkey, T. D. and Pellegrini, A. D. (eds) Child’s play: development and applied, Hillsdale, NJ, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
• Harris, J. R. (1988) The nature Assumption: why children turn out the way they do, New York, Free Press.
• Littleton, K., Miell, D and Faulkner, D. (2004) learning to collaborate, Collaborating to Learn, New York, NY, Nova Science.
• Pellegrini, A. D. (2003) ‘Perceptions and functions of play and real fighting in early adolescence’, Child Development, vol. 74, pp. 1522-33
• Pinker, S. (2002) The Blank Slate: the modern denial of human nature, London, Allen Lane.
• Smith, P.K., Bowers, L., Binney , V. and Cowie, H. (1999) Relationships of children involved in bully/victim problems at school’, in Woodhead, M., Faulkner D. and Littleton, K. (eds) Cultural Worlds of Early Childhood, London Routledge.
• Stalker, K. and Connors, C. (2004) Children’s perceptions of their disabled siblings: “’ She’s different but its normal for us”’, Children and Society, vol. 18 pp. 218-30.

edit on 1-6-2011 by michaelmcclen because: grammar



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 08:30 AM
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Great thread!
I am currently a High School student that is attending a local private school. I can personally vouch for this over homeschooling, provided the private school is a good one (all are not created equal). In my life, I have gone to a public school, a catholic private school, homeschool, and a non-secular private school.

What has worked for me may not work for everyone, but in my experience, the public school was the equivalent of a fiery hell for me and my cousin.
The religious private school was, of course, very strict about things. I also had to attend church and bible classes, though I am not a fan of organized religion, I did not mind this. What I did mind was their student "handbook." When I read that rulebook, I was told to sign several things. One of these contracts allowed them to search anything I possess, and force entry into my locker if they suspected I might have anything questionable with me. On top of all this, all students had to carry a clear or mesh backpack. When I asked the principal where my rights had gone, she responded by telling me that when one signs a contract, they give those rights up. I didn't stay there very long.

At one point, I was homeschooled by my mother. The decision for her to do this was made when we, as a family, thought that schooling in America was going the way of the dodo. I was always a very curious child, and had issues with focus when younger. I know I must have caused her great stress during this time. Other people may have better luck with getting their child to focus, and managing the stress of being a teacher. If it works for you, that's great. I am quite sure my mother has more respect for teachers now.

My personal solution to the school problem came in 8th grade. My parents discovered a very nice private school that was non-secular. They had just received a large donation, and used the money to build a 2.2 million dollar campus. The teachers were all dedicated and brilliant, the administration was kind, and I could carry whatever backpack I wanted. To my surprise, the kids were all very kind as well, and although there is occasional verbal fighting, I have yet to see a physical altercation break out at this place! At this place I feel I have rights, and the more respected you are as a student, the more rights you can be trusted with. Because the student body is under 400, the environment is better suited to learning, and sometimes a certain teacher will even engage in a Socratic style debate with a student. Thought is encouraged.
I have thrived here, and am now entering my junior year of High school as president of the student council. Currently I am working with the biology department to hopefully expand the trails we have cleared in the wetlands and woods behind the school. In the future, it may be possible for teachers to hold classes in these woods for a change of pace.

I don't pretend to have found the answer to the schooling problems in America, but I hope my account can help someone make a decision. I think there may be hope.



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 08:41 AM
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#6 is only one school currentley, in san antonio Tx. My neice and nephew go there.

My son, in kinder, is learning in spanish. Its a dual language program, follows the Tejas lee curricilm. I am happy with my school district for the time being.

I was kicked out of all texas public school at 14 , during the 9th grade. Over an ons I didnt even do. (smoking in the bathroom, I did that outside, lol)



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 08:49 AM
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Funny~We were just talking about this in my house. I personally know 2 High School Seniors, one in the National Honor Society and the other is on the Principals Honor Roll.

I spend a fair amount of time with both of these kids and I had NO idea of the things they did NOT know, that I had just assumed was taught in elementary school.

After finding out that neither of them could tell me how many days were in each month. I was somewhat shocked, so we all sat down and I started asking them questions. (Talk about deer in the headlight looks)

I discovered, not only did they not know the amount of days in each month. Neither had ever heard of a "leap year".
Neither could name all the states in the U.S., nor the capitals. (God forbid had I asked them to point out countries on a map).
I said, "what in the world did you learn in Geography?" THEY DIDN'T KNOW WHAT GEOGRAPHY WAS!!!!!
At that point, I did my own research and discovered, They don't teach Geography anymore.....

We then moved on to telling time on a standard clock..They could, but not just by looking, they had to actually count 5,10,15.....

I was/am speechless!!!! These 2 kids are considered some of "the best" achievers.
What is going on in the world??? I thought I had slipped into the Twilight Zone.

These kids do not have to do any "thinking" for themselves anymore. Its all at the fingertips with the internet. I started telling them about how (in my day) we had to actually look things up in an encyclopedia and you were considered "lucky" if your family owned "all" the volumes.
(Some were missing at our house)
THEY DIDN'T KNOW WHAT ENCYCLOPEDIA'S WERE!!!!!

At that point I just had to stop the conversation..I couldn't hear anymore of the craziness. I did tell them that if I would've had all the technology that was available to them, theres no telling where I would've ended up... Probably rule the world...haha



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 09:25 AM
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reply to post by delionqueen1
 


This is like a "game over" to me. More and more people depend of technology to think, speak, act and even have an opinion. I wonder what would be in if one day we had no access to it. I get chills just thinking about all this kind of dependence we have.



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 10:34 AM
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reply to post by RUSSO
 

I grew up in a small town school. I've made bad choices but got good grades. Many of my pupils moved on to be successful people. We had a lot of freedom growing up. No police roaming the halls. I'm 33. I've had nightmares in the past few years about schools overrun with thick-headed people who obsess about control and discipline and lose sight of the fact that children are children and need love and family more than they need handcuffs. These few dreams impacted me on a very deep level. I do not wish to see our schools become like that. I think it's a disease in our culture that's starting to make itself visible now. We have to relearn how to trust ourselves and how to believe in a common good and trust our fellow man even when things go wrong. We have to relearn that there're some things we cannot stop, some things we cannot control.

People are fearful. We need to make them believe once again that peace and goodwill exist. We can't force peace. Peace happens naturally in a free society. No amount of handcuffs will make us feel peaceful. Wars won't make us feel peaceful. We do sometimes need handcuffs and war, but it's a mistake to assume that increasing their scope will somehow also increase the peace. I think this is the gut reaction when people are fearful. That's why I think we must find a way to reduce fears and make people believe in peace again not in handcuffs and bombs.

We need to find people who fought in WWII but did not support Vietnam. We need to find police officers who served for at least 20 years who do not feel police are the only answer for schools. We need to crush the either/or thinking that's prevalent. We need to reestablish that humans are complex and diverse and it's these characteristics that're our saving grace, not orderliness.

Orderliness .... the new peace. The new security. There's no HUMAN in that!!!!

Military people aren't all troubled dropouts. Police officers aren't all cowardly insecure men looking to get back at you. They're all HUMANS! We're humans. We have to make a system humans can live in. A perfectly ordered and ruled system is more suitable for robots than it's humans.
edit on 1-6-2011 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 11:00 AM
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As someone who has spent a not insignificant amount of time in both institutions, I would like to call for an end to this thread.

We can complain about policy in public schools all we want, but it's ludicrous to compare public schools to prison, regardless of the number of likenesses that can be conjured up by stretching the imagination just a little bit.

Anyone who thinks there's any merit to the statement made in the thread title, has never been to prison. Public schools usually have kitchens, so do prisons. They've also got bathrooms and utility rooms, just like prisons. So on and so forth. We can draw all kinds of similarities between schools and prisons, but this doesn't make them anything alike.

Don't get me wrong, I've got two kids in school, and have tremendous problems with the public education system, but prison it is not.



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