It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

100 Civil War Scenes: Rare Photos by Mathew Brady

page: 1
8

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 06:14 AM
link   
I really dont know where post this, so if this is the wrong forum I apologize to the mods for the inconvenience.

I just picked some pictures to post here, but you can see all HERE

Mathew B.Brady: ca. 1860 - ca. 1865



Virginia, Fredericksburg, Battery D, Second United States Artillery.: 1863



Virginia, Fredericksburg, Pontoon Bridge across the Rappahannock river.: 05/1863



Dead soldier in trench, Petersburg, ca. 1860 - ca. 1865



200-1b gun on Morris Island. Used for shelling Charleston, ca. 1860 - ca. 1865



In the trenches before Petersburg, Va., 1865, ca. 1860 - ca. 1865



Cannon of largest size mounted in Fort, at Battery Rodgers, ca. 1860 - ca. 1865



Aquia Creek and Fredericksburg Railroad, construction corps at work, Va.: ca. 1860 - ca. 1865



Wounded soldiers under trees, Marye's Heights, Fredericksburg. After the battle of Spotsylvania, 1864.: ca. 1860 - ca. 1865



Wounded soldiers in hospital: ca. 1860 - ca. 1865



Ruins of Richmond Va, ca. 1860 - ca. 1865



Confederate Trenches. Fascine Trench Breastworks, Petersburg, Va., ca. 1860 - ca. 1865



Infantry regiment in camp. [Probably 96th Pennsylvania Infantry at Camp Northumberland near Washington, DC, ca. 1861] Mathew Brady Collection. (Army): ca. 1860 - ca. 1865



Confederate dead behind stone wall. The 6th. Maine Inf. penetrated the Confederate lines at this point. Fredericksburg, Va.: ca. 1860 - ca. 1865



Capitol of the United States, Washington, D.C, ca. 1860 - ca. 1865



Battery in Fort: ca. 1860 - ca. 1865



Benson's battery behind earthworks. At Fair Oaks or Seven Pines, Va.., ca. 1860 - ca. 1865



All pictures here --> Beforeitsnews

I hope you enjoy.


edit on 1-6-2011 by RUSSO because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 06:20 AM
link   
Great pictures... I love American history and I really appreciate you taking the time to post these. S&F



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 06:47 AM
link   

Originally posted by OptimusSubprime
Great pictures... I love American history and I really appreciate you taking the time to post these. S&F


Thanks, my desire was to post then all



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 07:33 AM
link   
Some more info:

Teaching With Documents:

The Civil War as Photographed by Mathew Brady


Background

Many historians call the Civil War the central event in U.S. history. The formation of the Constitution corrected the autonomy of individual states that the Articles of Confederation did not harness. Still, the young country struggled for 75 years to find a graceful balance between the power of the federal government and the several states. The rights of states and the issue of slavery propelled the country into civil war. Today, America defines itself from that point forward, as it still seeks a more perfect union and equality for all its citizens.

The sociology of the American Civil War can be viewed through a medium that was coming of age in the middle of the 19th century: photography. The National Archives and Records Administration makes available on-line over 6,000 digitized images from the Civil War. Mathew Brady and his associates, most notably Alexander Gardner, George Barnard, and Timothy O'Sullivan, photographed many battlefields, camps, towns, and people touched by the war. Their images depict the multiple aspects of the war except one crucial element: battle. Photographs show camp life, routines, war preparations, the moments just prior to battle, and the aftermath of battle. The primitive technology of photography required that subjects be still at the moment the camera's shutter snapped. Battle scenes are, therefore, missing from the record of history of this era. The study of war journals and artifacts has developed a network of people, particularly located on the East Coast, who perform Civil War re-enactments. Recently, these groups have helped American filmmakers portray the war in realistic terms in movies like Gettysburg and Glory and in other documentaries on key Civil War battles. Thus, the more modern technology of cinematography fills the gap left by photography in recording the battles.

edit on 1-6-2011 by RUSSO because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 08:06 AM
link   
Excellent! These images certainly paint a vivid picture of a chilling and bitter reality.



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 08:50 AM
link   

Originally posted by jibeho
Excellent! These images certainly paint a vivid picture of a chilling and bitter reality.



Thats some of the best images i have ever seen about that period in time. Sometimes a picture really worth more than a thousand words.
edit on 1-6-2011 by RUSSO because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 06:08 PM
link   
reply to post by RUSSO
 


Great photos. S&F for you.

2nd line.



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 09:57 PM
link   

Originally posted by guppy
reply to post by RUSSO
 


Great photos. S&F for you.

2nd line.


Glad you like it, here ican find some more.

www.civilwarphotos.net...



new topics

top topics



 
8

log in

join