Road Trip USA - advice needed on where to go

page: 1
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join

posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 04:30 AM
link   
Hi,

I am looking in to doing a road trip in the US next year (probably July), and was wondering if anyone could give me some advice?

I'd probably flying in to LA and leaving from there too... I'm looking for good driving roads, great scenery, and to avoid the beaten track as much as possible. I'm looking to do roughly 2000 miles in about 18 - 21 days.

The route i've found that looks good is LA - Yuma - Tucson - Juarez - Roswell - Albuquerque - LA

So that would be Route 80 from LA to Jaurez, not sure what route to Albuquerque via Roswell? and then Route 66 back to LA.

Does this sound like a good trip? Or can someone suggest something more exciting?
edit on 1-6-2011 by ajax_andy because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 04:42 AM
link   
I have some very important advice for you...

Avoid Yellowstone, New Madrid, Mexican Gulf, all security services like police and para militaries, dont question the authority of officails, dont dance at any national monuments or memorials, try avoid contact with the local brainwashed masses, as they might report you as a terrorist (and then you're #ed). Try not to use your mobile fone, if you dont wasnt to be tracked by the FBI, do not break ANY rules, no matter how trivial, or you are very likely to be shot by the many insane armed "public protectors".

But above all, have fun in America ! Land of the Free, home of the Brave.



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 04:54 AM
link   

Originally posted by OccultScience
I have some very important advice for you...

Avoid Yellowstone, New Madrid, Mexican Gulf, all security services like police and para militaries, dont question the authority of officails, dont dance at any national monuments or memorials, try avoid contact with the local brainwashed masses, as they might report you as a terrorist (and then you're #ed). Try not to use your mobile fone, if you dont wasnt to be tracked by the FBI, do not break ANY rules, no matter how trivial, or you are very likely to be shot by the many insane armed "public protectors".

But above all, have fun in America ! Land of the Free, home of the Brave.


Haha thanks, I suppose a reply like this isn't too unexpected on a conspiracy website... i'll bare what you've said in mind.



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 05:12 AM
link   
reply to post by ajax_andy
 


Route 66 a lot of it is still there although a few places are chunked up for different highways. I travelled down it 2yrs ago and had the time of my life. It's filled with great little towns and awesome tourist traps, plus all the people along the way were really nice and helpful.

Or national road I traveled down that for a ways it's great if you have no where to go and a lot of time to get there.



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 05:15 AM
link   

Originally posted by Poker
reply to post by ajax_andy
 


Route 66 a lot of it is still there although a few places are chunked up for different highways. I travelled down it 2yrs ago and had the time of my life. It's filled with great little towns and awesome tourist traps, plus all the people along the way were really nice and helpful.

Or national road I traveled down that for a ways it's great if you have no where to go and a lot of time to get there.


Thanks for the reply,

I've heard mixed review of route 66, so its good to hear that you had a great time on it. Do you remember if there was much to see between LA and Albuquerque?



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 05:24 AM
link   
Sedona in Arizona up near Flagstaff! It is truly magical.



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 05:28 AM
link   
reply to post by ajax_andy
 

It is really none of my business, and is obviously your choice to answer or not.

Where you are from?
Or if that's more than you want to say, then what type of climate?
Snow covered mountains; tiny island in the Pacific; in a hole in the middle of a large desert; a 20 square foot apartment in downtown Manhattan; etc. etc...... only curious.



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 05:29 AM
link   
reply to post by ajax_andy
 


Well the L.A. To Albuquerque stretch has the teepee hotels and a lot of the other sites that were depicted in the movie cars they also have a lot of museums, ghost towns and such plus Arizona has one of the longest stretches of route 66 that's still intact, 106 miles I think might be a little more or a little less. They still have burmashave signs down the side of it.



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 05:30 AM
link   

Originally posted by BrokenCircles
reply to post by ajax_andy
 

It is really none of my business, and is obviously your choice to answer or not.

Where you are from?
Or if that's more than you want to say, then what type of climate?
Snow covered mountains; tiny island in the Pacific; in a hole in the middle of a large desert; a 20 square foot apartment in downtown Manhattan; etc. etc...... only curious.


No thats fine I dont mind answering that question... I live in the UK (England to be precise)



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 05:31 AM
link   

Originally posted by Poker
reply to post by ajax_andy
 


Well the L.A. To Albuquerque stretch has the teepee hotels and a lot of the other sites that were depicted in the movie cars they also have a lot of museums, ghost towns and such plus Arizona has one of the longest stretches of route 66 that's still intact, 106 miles I think might be a little more or a little less. They still have burmashave signs down the side of it.


Sounds really good!



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 05:32 AM
link   

Originally posted by Starwise
Sedona in Arizona up near Flagstaff! It is truly magical.


Ok thats seems pretty much en-route. Whats there?



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 06:06 AM
link   
reply to post by ajax_andy
 


I forgot to mention that you could also hop on down to Phoenix Arizona. To search for the Lost Dutchman's mine in the Superstition Mountains. I wanted to go treasure hunting there but I didn't have time during my road trip.

The Lost Dutchman Gold Mine (also known by many similar names) is reportedly a very rich gold mine hidden in the Superstition Mountains, near Apache Junction, east of Phoenix, Arizona



The mine is named after German immigrant Jacob Waltz...It is perhaps the most famous lost mine in American history: Arizona place-name expert Byrd Granger notes that, as of 1977, the Lost Dutchman story was printed or cited at least six times more often than two other fairly well-known tales, the story of Captain Kidd's lost treasure, and the story of the Lost Pegleg mine in California. Robert Blair notes that people have been seeking the Lost Dutchman mine since at least 1892,[1] while Granger writes that according to one estimate, 8,000 people annually made some effort to locate the Lost Dutchman's mine.[2] Former Arizona Attorney General Bob Corbin is among those who have looked for the mine.[3] Others have argued the mine has little or no basis in fact and is a legend though, as noted below, Blair argues that all the main components of the story have at least some basis in fact. According to many versions of the tale, the mine is either cursed, or protected by enigmatic guardians who wish to keep the mine's location a secret.


WIKI



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 08:17 AM
link   

Originally posted by Poker
reply to post by ajax_andy
 


I forgot to mention that you could also hop on down to Phoenix Arizona. To search for the Lost Dutchman's mine in the Superstition Mountains. I wanted to go treasure hunting there but I didn't have time during my road trip.

The Lost Dutchman Gold Mine (also known by many similar names) is reportedly a very rich gold mine hidden in the Superstition Mountains, near Apache Junction, east of Phoenix, Arizona



The mine is named after German immigrant Jacob Waltz...It is perhaps the most famous lost mine in American history: Arizona place-name expert Byrd Granger notes that, as of 1977, the Lost Dutchman story was printed or cited at least six times more often than two other fairly well-known tales, the story of Captain Kidd's lost treasure, and the story of the Lost Pegleg mine in California. Robert Blair notes that people have been seeking the Lost Dutchman mine since at least 1892,[1] while Granger writes that according to one estimate, 8,000 people annually made some effort to locate the Lost Dutchman's mine.[2] Former Arizona Attorney General Bob Corbin is among those who have looked for the mine.[3] Others have argued the mine has little or no basis in fact and is a legend though, as noted below, Blair argues that all the main components of the story have at least some basis in fact. According to many versions of the tale, the mine is either cursed, or protected by enigmatic guardians who wish to keep the mine's location a secret.


WIKI


Haha that sounds like fun! I'll have to check that out if I have time



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 08:46 AM
link   
reply to post by ajax_andy
 


Just remember if you strike it rich I deserve a percentage for turning you onto it.



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 08:54 AM
link   

Originally posted by Poker
reply to post by ajax_andy
 


Just remember if you strike it rich I deserve a percentage for turning you onto it.


Haha its a deal



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 10:39 AM
link   
reply to post by ajax_andy
 

Thanks. Like I said, I was just curious. I've only been to the West Coast once, so the only advice I could give, that others have not already given, is-
Stay out of Indiana, unless you want to see a lot of corn.

Ever since reading this thread earlier, I have had this song going non-stop in my head. I hadn't heard it for years, so I had to search the video. I just wanted to share it with you.

Red Hot Chili Peppers - Road Trippin'


[color=B5EAAA]Road trippin' with my two favorite allies
Fully loaded we got snacks and supplies
It's time to leave this town
It's time to steal away
Let's go get lost
Anywhere in the U.S.A.

Let's go get lost
Let's go get lost
........................
.............
......


edit on 6/1/11 by BrokenCircles because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 11:41 AM
link   
reply to post by ajax_andy
 


Well if you get bored of all that southwest beauty. You can come see the northwest. We've got sasquatch!!!!
And don't forget Mt. Rainer and its underground UFO bases.



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 11:54 AM
link   
2 books might help you with your choice.
1) Road Trip USA has the more well known routes covered, plus nearby attractions and things off the beaten path.
2) 1001 Things To See Before You Die (US and Canada) has some interesting things in it. It's also broken down by state or provence.
good luck.
every state has a tourism book, you would just have to find it on the web or call the phone number. they'll usually mail for free.
edit on 1-6-2011 by Yahm16 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 02:29 PM
link   
If you get a chance, The Great Smokey Mountains southeast US are great. Lots of fun stuff to do there and about a day's drive from Florida and some great beaches. Enjoy your summer.



posted on Jun, 2 2011 @ 03:42 AM
link   

Originally posted by BrokenCircles
reply to post by ajax_andy
 

Thanks. Like I said, I was just curious. I've only been to the West Coast once, so the only advice I could give, that others have not already given, is-
Stay out of Indiana, unless you want to see a lot of corn.

Ever since reading this thread earlier, I have had this song going non-stop in my head. I hadn't heard it for years, so I had to search the video. I just wanted to share it with you.

Red Hot Chili Peppers - Road Trippin'


[color=B5EAAA]Road trippin' with my two favorite allies
Fully loaded we got snacks and supplies
It's time to leave this town
It's time to steal away
Let's go get lost
Anywhere in the U.S.A.

Let's go get lost
Let's go get lost
........................
.............
......


edit on 6/1/11 by BrokenCircles because: (no reason given)


Hey thanks for posting that, its a great song and one i've not heard for ages!

I think that'll be put on my playlist for the trip... shame its a year away because I want to go now





new topics
top topics
 
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join