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Germany decides to abandon nuclear power by 2022

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posted on May, 30 2011 @ 06:47 AM
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Let's see how popular this is,when the electricity prices go thru the roof, and there are constant blackout's
at peak load time's,
edit on 30/5/2011 by Travlla because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 30 2011 @ 06:49 AM
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Originally posted by Maslo
reply to post by rigel4
 





Water fueled cars. if this is not a bogus technology, why can't it be scaled up to produce power for National use.


There are no water fueled cars. If you mean those hydrogen fueled cars that produce water as exhaust, then be aware that the source of hydrogen is electrolysis of water powered by electricity from power plants. It is only a storage mechanism, not a source of energy.


Sorry NO. What you are describing is not what i had in mind. There was a thread the other day about the challenge to big oil.

I have found it and given us a link to it.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

This is with out a doubt the way forward in my opinion
edit on 30-5-2011 by rigel4 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 07:00 AM
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reply to post by Maslo
 


Your post speaks against you.



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 07:07 AM
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Originally posted by Jepic
reply to post by Maslo
 


Your post speaks against you.


How exactly?



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 07:11 AM
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reply to post by rigel4
 


Seems rather dubious to me.. at best. You cannot get more energy from uniting oxygen and hydrogen into water than it originally took to split said water into H2 and O2. Basic chemistry thermodynamics. Perpetuum mobile is impossible.

Link
edit on 30/5/11 by Maslo because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 09:09 AM
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Originally posted by arriana
Power is not a ine size fits all system. Here in the UK nuke power stations are pretty safe, we rarely have earthquakes and they are tiny, and we never have anything like tsunamis or dangerous hurricanes.
I see you used the word "rarely" for Earthquakes.

You should have used that word instead of "never" for tsunamis. The Atlantic ocean has them but they are much more rare than in the Pacific ocean:

Atlantic Ocean Tsunamis: Rare but Possible


The most widely known Atlantic Ocean tsunami struck Lisbon, Portugal on November 1, 1755 . It was caused by a magnitude 8.6 earthquake beneath the floor of the Atlantic about 100 miles offshore. This earthquake and associated tsunami destroyed most of the city of Lisbon. Waves up to 12 meters high hit the coastlines of Spain and Portugal just minutes after this earthquake. Over nine hours later waves with seven meter runup heights arrived in the Caribbean and caused significant damage. The earthquake and tsunami killed between 60,000 and 100,000 people.
Be careful about saying "never".

And since it was a "rare event" that caught Japan off guard, you (and all of us) should have a heightened awareness of the fact that events thought to be rare do indeed happen (not that often, but they do happen).

There was no natural disaster at Three Mile Island or Chernobyl where the 2 prior disasters occurred, so Germany realizes it doesn't take a natural disaster to have a big problem. But ironically, they may end up killing more people with toxins released from coal, than nuclear power would have. Windmills just aren't as reliable as a steady source of power. I like them, but they have limitations.



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 09:35 AM
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reply to post by Maslo
 


More than half opposed the idea of building a nuclear power station. Nevertheless don't expect every Austrian to have the same opinion on this matter. I'm merely saying that me as an Austrian citizen agree and support this initiative taken by the German government.



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 09:58 AM
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This will be an amusing circus to watch for the next decade or so.

They are going to get about halfway through their "renewable energy" projects before they realize they are not going to be able to afford the maintenance on these systems coupled with the continued installation to meet demands. They will find there to be a startling lack of space for their ambitions, and likely end up purchasing a number of self-contained fission reactor systems as part of a stop-gap measure while they try and sort things out.



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 10:17 AM
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Originally posted by rigel4
Hope the British government are listening too. but sadly British governments are
more greedy than their German counterpart.


How can an energy policy which includes nuclear power equate to greed? Silly statement.

The German decision is political. You can dress the decison up in as many ways as you like, but it is a decison based on politics and the Green vote, rather than anything practical. The only winners in this will be the Russian's who will have move custom in Germany for their gas.

A nation as highly industrailised as Germany has energy needs beyond the capability of renewables and nuclear (like it or not) is reliable and safe.

The French will probably build more nuclear and it is likely that the UK will reinvest as part of their carbon reduction plans, and as part of a policy to avoid energy dependence.

Regards



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 10:56 AM
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Germany! The first industrialised nation to abandon the nuclear age!


Massive solar farm for Europe planned
Tuesday, 14 July 2009Agence France-Presse

The Desertec Consortium proposal aims to turn desert sunlight - plentyful in Africa and the Middle East - into electricity for Europe, where sunlight is less dependable.

The consortium says the massive 400 billion euro (US$560 billion) proposal could provide up to 15 per cent of Europe's electricity needs by 2050. Engineering giants ABB and Siemens, energy groups E.ON and RWE and financial institutions Deutsche Bank and Munich Re are among the companies which signed a protocol in Munich.

"Today we have taken a step forward" towards the project's realisation, said Nikolaus von Bomhard, head of the reinsurance giant Munich Re, which hosted the signing.

www.cosmosmagazine.com...


(Wiki detractors look away now)



The Finsterwalde Solar Park is as of November 2010 the world’s largest photovoltaic plant with 80.7 MWp. The project is located in Finsterwalde, Germany and developed by Q-Cells International and LDK Solar. It is equipped with Q-Cells modules and LDK solar wafers. The first phase of the project was commissioned in 2009, the second and third in 2010.

en.wikipedia.org...



The Strasskirchen Solar Park is the sixth largest photovoltaic power station in the world, with an installed capacity of 54 MW. The facility is located in Straßkirchen, Germany.

en.wikipedia.org...



The Lieberose Photovoltaic Park is a 53 megawatt (MW) solar photovoltaic power plant in Lieberose, Brandenburg, Germany. The solar park with 700,000 solar panels which went fully on line in October 2009, is the world's third-largest, and will supply electricity for 15,000 households a year while reducing the use of pollution-generating fossil fuels. The Lieberose Solar Park cost $238-million and is operated by the Juwi Group, which has a 20-year contract on the land.

en.wikipedia.org...



The Köthen Solar Park is a photovoltaic power station in Köthen, Germany. It has a capacity of 45 MWp and an annual output of 42 GWh. The solar park is developed built by RGE Energy.

en.wikipedia.org...



Waldpolenz Solar Park, which is the world’s largest thin-film photovoltaic (PV) power system, was built by German developer and operator Juwi at a former military air base to the east of Leipzig in Germany. The power plant is a 40 MW solar power system using state-of-the-art thin film technology, and was fully operational by the end of 2008. 550,000 First Solar thin-film modules from cadmium telluride (CdTe) are being used, which supply about 40,000 MWh of electricity per year.

en.wikipedia.org...


Kind of suggests there is more to this decision than electioneering.



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 11:24 AM
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Originally posted by Maslo
This is the result of anti-nuclear fearmongering and populism, not rational thinking, IMHO


Really? Did you miss everything that just happened in Japan?

They said there was nothing to worry about, no need to fear. Yeah, right. Now the entire Pacific Ocean has had radioactive clouds floating over it for weeks, that have been circling the globe.


And for those of you who don't think there are any other viable sources of power... Petroleum, industrial, monopoly. Our energy sources have been manipulated by big businesses for over 100 years, the same amount of time they've been wealthy and powerful enough to be able to suppress other technologies through various lobbying, buying up patents and straight bullying.

Nuclear energy is a dinosaur technology already. Just let it die, and let Asia phase in the new technologies. They're already kicking our oil companies out, and there was just an article about Japan beginning production of a car that runs on water. Come on people, get with the program!



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 01:07 PM
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Originally posted by Maslo
This is the result of anti-nuclear fearmongering and populism, not rational thinking, IMHO. Nuclear will be substituted by dangerous coal and importing costly power from abroad.

edit on 30/5/11 by Maslo because: (no reason given)


Fool me once, Chernobyl... Fool me twice, Three mile Island... Fool me three times, Fukushima. I think humanity is tired of being a fool to the vested interests with deep pockets in the energy sector.

Although it might be cool to have twenty fingers, think I'll have another glass of water here on the West Coast. Glug, glug, glug. ah nuclear kool aid, that really hits the spot!
edit on 30-5-2011 by CourageousEyesoftheHeart because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 03:06 PM
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reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


Greetings:

Great OP!

S&F!

We remember foundly our time in Tepec in the '70's when '23' was the party highway... a-h-h, the good old days.

We have attempted to sound the alarm here in the homeland... perhaps the following threads will interest the discerning student:

Is This the Beginning of the End of Nuclear Power in the U.S.?

Will America's Nuclear Power Plants Fail in an 8.0 Earthquake?

America's Being Nuked - Can we Together Stop the Madness?

We will be updating the threads mentioned as soon as we complete our mission here in Rabun County.

In Peace, Love & Light

tfw



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 03:20 PM
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Coal plants are the way to go. Windmills are not. Glad to see Germany abandoning nukes.



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 03:32 PM
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doublepost
edit on 30/5/11 by Maslo because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 03:32 PM
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reply to post by teapot
 


To put things into perspective: solar power plants you listed are some of the largest in the world, yet they produce about 1/100 of energy (



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 04:43 PM
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Originally posted by Maslo
reply to post by teapot
 


To put things into perspective: solar power plants you listed are some of the largest in the world, yet they produce about 1/100 of energy (



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 04:44 PM
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Lights out, lights out in Germany.



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 05:19 PM
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Originally posted by Erongaricuaro
Not surprisingly there is some backlash after Japan's nuke-power disaster. Germany's plants are now somewhat aging and in need of modernizing their power grid. Germany will be the first industrialized nation to decide to do a turnaround and go nuke-free and turn to renewable sources.


There are no renewable sources of energy that can replace fossil fuels or nuclear currently.
All of them are much more expensive and produce energy intermittently. solar heat,solar
electric, wind generators,bio fuels. They are too expensive to even meter.
Its a scam subsidized by tax payer money.
The exception is producing solar hot water for heating homes and hot water use.
And solar heated houses.



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 05:49 PM
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Originally posted by Maslo
This is the result of anti-nuclear fearmongering and populism, not rational thinking, IMHO. Nuclear will be substituted by dangerous coal and importing costly power from abroad.

edit on 30/5/11 by Maslo because: (no reason given)


you're kidding Right? "dangerous" coal? since when has a coal plant ever melted down and blasted ionizing radiation across the northern hemisphere polluting for tens of thousands of years. what a maroon. what a nincompoop.



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