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Why world series baseball when its only American teams

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posted on May, 27 2011 @ 03:38 PM
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It shows the arrogance about America how can you call something world series but no other countries take part,I don't know why it bugs me it just does I don't follow baseball so I may have the concept wrong about the world series if I have correct me.
Does anybody else think this is pure arrogance???




posted on May, 27 2011 @ 03:42 PM
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Eh a quick google search reveals


Origin of the Name "World Series"
One baseball myth that just won't die is that the "World Series" was named for the New York World newspaper, which supposedly sponsored the earliest contests. It didn't, and it wasn't.

In fact, the postseason series between the AL and NL champs was originally known as the "Championship of the World" or "World's Championship Series." That was shortened through usage to "World's Series" and finally to "World Series."

This usage can be traced through the annual baseball guides. Spalding's Base Ball Guide for 1887 reported the results of the 1886 postseason series between Chicago, champions of the National League, and St. Louis, champions of the American Association, under the heading "The World's Championship." As the editor noted, the two leagues "both entitle their championship contests each season as those for the base ball championship of the United States," so a more grandiose name was required to describe the postseason showdown between the two "champions of the United States."

But the Spalding Guide -- which, after all, was published by one of the world's largest sporting goods companies, with a vested interest in bringing baseball to other lands -- had grander ambitions. By 1890, the Spalding Guide was explaining that "[t]he base ball championship of the United States necessarily includes that of the entire world, though the time will come when Australia will step in as a rival, and after that country will come Great Britain; but all that is for the future."

This didn't happen, but the name "World's Championship Series" stuck. Reporting on the first modern postseason series, the Red Sox-Pirates battle of 1903, the 1904 Reach Guide called it the "World's Championship Series." By 1912, Reach's headline spoke of the "World's Series," while editor Francis Richter's text still referred to the "World's Championship Series." The Reach Guide switched from "World's Series" to "World Series" in 1931, retaining the modern usage through its merger with the Spalding Guide and through its final issue in 1941. The separately-edited Spalding Guide used "World's Series" through 1916, switching to "World Series" in the 1917 edition.

The Spalding-Reach Guide was replaced as Major League Baseball's semi-official annual by the Sporting News Guide, first published in 1942. The Sporting News Guide used "World's Series" from 1942 through 1963, changing to "World Series" in the 1964 edition.

Moreover, the New York World never claimed any connection with postseason baseball. The World was a tabloid much given to flamboyant self-promotion. If it had been involved in any way with sponsoring a championship series, the fact would have been emblazoned across its sports pages for months. I reviewed every issue of the World for the months leading up to the 1903 and 1905 World's Championship Series -- there's not a word suggesting any link between the paper and the series.


source: roadsidephotos.sabr.org...

Common usage doesn't always equate to arrogance.



posted on May, 27 2011 @ 03:43 PM
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I have mentioned this very same conundrum several times over the last few years - never really got a straight answer.



posted on May, 27 2011 @ 03:46 PM
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Toronto blue jays...................



posted on May, 27 2011 @ 03:46 PM
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reply to post by Uncertain1
 


its not ONLY USA teams......I.E..> Toronto Blue-jays..!!



posted on May, 27 2011 @ 03:50 PM
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Also 30% of the players are from other countries and the players as a whole are considered the best in the world.



posted on May, 27 2011 @ 03:51 PM
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reply to post by darrman
 


Then it should be "North American Continent Series" or something like that


'World' Series implies, you know, the WORLD.



posted on May, 27 2011 @ 04:07 PM
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The only game that is played in EVERY country in the world is football (Or soccer as some countries call it) Football has a real "World Series"........The World Cup.



posted on May, 27 2011 @ 04:11 PM
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lol thats not bad, explain THIS one to me. miss universe miss.... universe...



posted on May, 27 2011 @ 04:12 PM
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Originally posted by alldaylong
The only game that is played in EVERY country in the world is football (Or soccer as some countries call it) Football has a real "World Series"........The World Cup.



World series cricket (the 1970's) even made a bit of sense as a name.
It didnt take off as well as expected, but with a few 'international' teams and plans to make more, it was still more so than the baseball.



posted on May, 27 2011 @ 04:16 PM
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Its the best league in the world, why would you not call it world series baseball?



posted on May, 27 2011 @ 04:24 PM
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Sounds like somebody is jealous baseball isnt played in there country.
sorry.



posted on May, 27 2011 @ 04:24 PM
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Originally posted by OUNjahhryn
lol thats not bad, explain THIS one to me. miss universe miss.... universe...


This is the sole reason why aliens have stopped trying to help us!



posted on May, 27 2011 @ 04:28 PM
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Once we figure out teleportation, we can really make it the world series


Anyway, we could add plenty teams and stop making them play against the same ones all the time.



posted on May, 27 2011 @ 04:29 PM
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Originally posted by lokdog
Sounds like somebody is jealous baseball isnt played in there country.
sorry.


Personally I think it's a boring game.

Just for the record I also find watching paint dry more interesting than watching the cricket. Yes, I guess that makes me a bad Aussie



posted on May, 27 2011 @ 04:36 PM
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For me Baseball is the equivalent of saying good night! Boooooooooring. The only sport I can think of right now that's worse is golf.



posted on May, 27 2011 @ 07:29 PM
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Im an Australian who's asked this many times before also, it is somewhat arrogant to claim that the US & Toronto make up the world, & if it came down to a Real World Series, Id be thinking of putting my money behind some Japanese teams.

That said, I wish it would pick up its profile around the world. I used to play cricket as most Aussy boys do, now that was a truly boring game, & I switched to playing baseball. In my opinion its a far better & more exciting game than most out there, especially cricket, not to mention the mind numbingly boring soccer (theres at least 6 types of Football so get used to it being soccer).

It was interesting to see Spaldings idea that Australia would be the next to step into the arena. I wasnt going to reply to this until, just as I got to the bottom of the thread, an add came on the TV for the ABL, Australian Baseball League. It is new, started last year without much noise, & is run by the MLB. Expect to see a lot more Aussies in the MLB in coming years.

Personally I hope this happens all over the world, & that it picks up in popularity. Then maybe there can be a competition where teams from around the world can compete in a true World Series.



posted on May, 27 2011 @ 08:07 PM
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reply to post by Uncertain1
 


Probably a good job it's only (mainly) played by US teams. If it truly WAS worldwide then I doubt the US would ever have a winning team.


Those Korean protestors can pack quite a punch when wielding a bat.



posted on May, 27 2011 @ 08:49 PM
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posted on May, 27 2011 @ 09:17 PM
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It's just what it's called, it got named that a long, long time ago when the U.S. had a much more isolated mindset than it does now. It is what it is and it just isn't going to change, get over it. When Americans say the phrase "World Series" the don't even think of it in wider implications. You grow up hearing about it from the day you are born - it's a phrase that just means "baseball championship" to us. When I was seven years old, we called our little championship in the Wellwood Little League in the little town of Pikesville outside of Baltimore, Maryland the "World Series." It's silly, but it just means "championship" in the context of baseball.

If you look at all of the American sports that now have championship games that didn't in the early 1900's, none of them call it the "World _________." It's the "NBA Finals," the "Superbowl," the "NHL Finals" (often just referred to by the name of the trophy, "The Stanley Cup" - which is as much or more Canadian than American, anyway). If the baseball championship was created in a post World War 2 era it would probably just be called the "Major League Baseball Crown" or Championship, or something along those lines. Back in 1903 the mindset in America simply was different. People didn't look much beyond our own borders so it's understandable that it got called the World Series at that time. The American mindset about such things is quite honestly different, now. It's not about arrogance, and more about isolation - a kind of isolation that doesn't even exist here anymore.

The World Series is probably more akin to the Champions League in soccer (and yeah, I'm going to use that term because you Brits invented it, not us). The European leagues draw all of the best players from around the world, same as the MLB draws all of the best players, mainly due to economic reasons. Sure, some great players probably stay in Japan, which is probably akin to the South American club leagues where the very best are on par with European players but on average the league is at a lower level. The best Japanese players usually come to the U.S. and some, like Hideki Matsui or Ichiro Suzuki especially (one of the greatest athletes I've ever seen in any sport), have risen to the top of the game same as the best South American players do in Europe.

Baseball has relatively recently created a World Cup of baseball, however. It's called the World Baseball Classic. It's still trying to find its footing, and so far has been dominated by Eastern teams (Japan and South Korea) who quite honestly play with more national passion and pride than has America or Canada, thus far. It's sort of surprising that Cuba and the Dominican Republic haven't done better (both are perennial favorites) but they probably will soon enough (seriously, the tiny DR produces and insane number of insanely great baseball stars).
edit on 5/27/2011 by LifeInDeath because: (no reason given)



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