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Musicians Againts Bush

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posted on Aug, 4 2004 @ 01:47 PM
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NEW YORK - In an unprecedented series of concerts in nine swing states, more than 20 musical acts including Bruce Springsteen, Pearl Jam and the Dixie Chicks will perform fund-raising concerts one month before the Nov. 2 election in an effort to unseat President Bush.

The shows, which will begin Oct. 1 in Pennsylvania, will take an unusual approach: as many as six concerts on a single day in cities across the states expected to decide the November presidential race. Other stops on the tour are North Carolina, Ohio, Michigan, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Wisconsin and the key state in 2000, Florida.

Were trying to put forward a group of progressive ideals and change the administration in the White House, Springsteen told The Associated Press in the most overtly political statements of his 30-year career. Thats the success or failure, very clear cut and very simple.

The artists of different generations and genres will tour under the name Vote For Change, with shows Oct. 1-8. But the money generated will go to America Coming Together, which promises on its Web site to derail the right-wing Republican agenda by defeating George W. Bush.

The anticipated millions of dollars will be spent in the swing states before the presidential election, said ACT president Ellen Malcolm.

The shows will be presented by MoveOn Pac, the electoral arm of the liberal interest group MoveOn.org, with an official announcement expected Wednesday.

There was no immediate word on prices for tickets, which were going on sale for all shows Aug. 21. The shows will pair artists, such as Springsteen and REM or the Dixie Chicks and James Taylor. There will be 34 shows in 28 cities.

Natalie Maines, of the Dixie Chicks, who memorably told a London audience last year that she was ashamed to share her home state of Texas with Bush, echoed a Springsteen comment that this was the most important election of their lives.

A change is in order, Maines said. Theres never been a political climate like this, which is so the polar opposite of me as a person and what I believe in.

The idea was hatched by several of the acts managers, and quickly expanded. Once we started talking to each other, ideas started percolating and other artists started reaching out to us, said Jon Landau, Springsteens manager.

Other artists participating in the shows include hip-hoppers Jurassic 5, John Mellencamp, Bonnie Raitt, Jackson Browne, Babyface, Bright Eyes and the Dave Matthews Band. Most have a history of social activism, from Brownes anti-nuclear concerts to Mellencamps Farm Aid shows. Pearl Jam front man Vedder was a Ralph Nader backer in 2000.

At some point, you cant sit still, said Vedder, a harsh critic of the Iraq war. You cant spend your life, when people are getting killed, without asking serious questions about why.

Springsteen said he didnt fear any backlash over going public with his personal politics.

Its a pretty clear-cut decision in November, said Springsteen, whose songs have provided a backdrop for some Kerry events. Were chipping in our two cents. Thats all were trying to do.

www.msnbc.msn.com...


I'm not voting for Bush, Or Kerry for that matter. But I'd like to see what the Liberals and Dems would say if the Republicans would get a bunch of musicians to tour across America together to bash Kerry and raise money. It just burns me when these people can't win elections based on the issues that they represent, but need a traveling gang of musical know-it-alls to scam the voters. The people in the crowd will walk away knowing nothing about Kerry or his policies, will have spent a bunch of money to help his campaign, and will probably end up voting for him cause Dave Matthews told them to.


[edit on 4-8-2004 by mpeake]




posted on Aug, 4 2004 @ 01:53 PM
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The best part of America is that one can say what they what without fear of the Secret Police commin a knockin.

The sad part is that mindless monkeys are going to think "Wow, Springsteen is telling me to vote for some one so heck... I will."



posted on Aug, 4 2004 @ 01:58 PM
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Exactly! Thousands of 18 yr old first time voting little girls will vote for Kerry cause Ben Afflec said so. The sheople of America will do whatever the popular celebrities tell them to. And don't get me wrong, this goes for both parties. I just feel that it happens much more on the democratic side.



posted on Aug, 4 2004 @ 02:07 PM
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Shut up and play your guitar



posted on Aug, 4 2004 @ 02:22 PM
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Ahhh, the wisdom of Zappa.


Personally I don't mind if celebrities have opinions or even share them on a more public scale, but when a political affiliation hires them to push that agenda, well, I think that's crossing the line. And I'm sure that some of these musicians are happy to to this (cause it's hip to be anti Bush right now and this is great exposure for them), but I wonder how many of them would be willing to do it for free?



posted on Aug, 4 2004 @ 02:26 PM
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I'm not sure the message is get rid of Bush. From what I heard all monies from the concerts go to a voting organization--to encourage people to vote. This from Gary Graff, a local Michigan music writer.

While they are having this tour to campaign "for change", I'm not sure they are bashing bush.



posted on Aug, 4 2004 @ 02:30 PM
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Originally posted by DontTreadOnMe
I'm not sure the message is get rid of Bush. From what I heard all monies from the concerts go to a voting organization--to encourage people to vote. This from Gary Graff, a local Michigan music writer.

While they are having this tour to campaign "for change", I'm not sure they are bashing bush.


Of course they're gonna bash Bush! The concerts will be advertised under the guise of "voting for a change", but do you think that the Dixie Chicks are gonna hop on stage and just pick at their guitars and not take some cheap shots at Bush? Who knows, I may be wrong, but I think I am right in saying that these musicians will hold no punches and will not just end at pushing people to vote. The Dems would not have hired them if they were gonna be nuetral.

[edit on 4-8-2004 by mpeake]



posted on Aug, 4 2004 @ 02:43 PM
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Well, it seems the advance publicity is anti-bashing. But I can see where you could be right.
In that case, how could one rationalize going to any of these concerts if they were pro-Bush. Some folks are gonna hafta change their music preferences!



posted on Aug, 4 2004 @ 02:48 PM
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Originally posted by DontTreadOnMe
Well, it seems the advance publicity is anti-bashing. But I can see where you could be right.
In that case, how could one rationalize going to any of these concerts if they were pro-Bush. Some folks are gonna hafta change their music preferences!


Personally I don't think that the Dems are trying to sway the current Bush voters to the Democratic side. It's the undecided sheople that will most likely attend these concerts. Mostly first time voters. People who will look at their musical idols and follow their commands. It's actually a brilliant idea, but a shady one IMO.



posted on Aug, 4 2004 @ 03:30 PM
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If you're an entertainer, entertain. If you're a political activist, be a political activist. Trying to be both at the same time dilutes both efforts.



posted on Aug, 4 2004 @ 04:02 PM
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Sometimes being an entertainer and being a political activist is the same thing. Music is a great way to express your political views. I am voting for my first time this year, and I'm not going to vote a certian way just because some musican tells me to. The shows they are doing are about raising awareness, and getting young people to vote, not telling them how to vote and thats important.



posted on Aug, 4 2004 @ 04:11 PM
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If you are into that whole musicians against bush thing, and punk rock, you should check out Rock Against Bush. the CD is only 10 bucks at best buy. the concert is supposed to be awesome too.



posted on Aug, 4 2004 @ 04:30 PM
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I've noticed that a lot of musicians seem to be more anti-bush than most other entertainer groups (ie actors/actresses)

Just thought I'd note that..



posted on Aug, 4 2004 @ 04:31 PM
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All these idiots make me sick. Not because they are expressing their opinions, but because their message is so patently anti-American. You can bet your assets that these losers will never get another dime of mine.




[edit on 04/8/4 by GradyPhilpott]



posted on Aug, 4 2004 @ 04:52 PM
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This is so funny my 20 year old daughter was just reading to me this article from MSN when I saw it on ATS. This places is getting very competitive.


For the stand point of my daughter she thinks the whole thing is awesome.:lo



posted on Aug, 4 2004 @ 07:08 PM
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If you have not noticed, Dave Matthews isn't saying much about it, now that Bruce Sprinsteen has opened his mouth. ?Maybe because Dave Mathews is from Africa. The "entertainment industry" needs to keep doing their job, and not get involved with politics.
And I agree with Zappa "Shut up and play the guitar".



posted on Aug, 4 2004 @ 07:45 PM
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The purpose of art is to challenge and to comment on society; to influence and to make people think. The use of music as political commentary is a very old practice; in fact, it's kind of a standard thing in the Caribbean and South American cultures as well as in the Middle East and Africa.

Here in America, we have had equal opportunity musical bashing since the beginning of the republic.

Now, perhaps it's upsetting to you because you support Bush and not Kerry. Do you think that you'd find it upsetting if there was a group of musicians running around doing anti-Kerry concerts?



posted on Aug, 4 2004 @ 07:57 PM
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Originally posted by crmanager
The best part of America is that one can say what they what without fear of the Secret Police commin a knockin.
....


One, does not mean celebereties.

Thats not true. I don't know anything about central and south America but in Canada there are laws that prohibit celebreties from intervening in political debates. Same thing can be said about the States.

Several students got together and are taking Moore to court for his intervention, since Moore said something along the lines of voting for Harper is like voting for Bush.

Moore is set to be fined for his actions.



posted on Aug, 4 2004 @ 08:46 PM
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Originally posted by Byrd
The purpose of art is to challenge and to comment on society; to influence and to make people think. The use of music as political commentary is a very old practice; in fact, it's kind of a standard thing in the Caribbean and South American cultures as well as in the Middle East and Africa.

Here in America, we have had equal opportunity musical bashing since the beginning of the republic.

Now, perhaps it's upsetting to you because you support Bush and not Kerry. Do you think that you'd find it upsetting if there was a group of musicians running around doing anti-Kerry concerts?


If you're refering to me as to whether I'd be offended if there was a group of musicians running around doing anti-Kerry concerts, then please refer to my previous posts. I said I am neither a Kerry or Bush fan and won't vote for either. I just don't like how politicians need to use celebrities to push their agendas instead of using the issues they represent. I also said it works both ways, but that IMO it is the Dems that use this tactic the most. I also said I don't mind when musicians express their opinions, just that I don't like it when political parties hire them to do so.

If you weren't addressing me and my previous posts then nevermind.



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