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NASA reveals design for deep space vehicle

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posted on May, 25 2011 @ 10:44 AM
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NASA reveals design for deep space vehicle


www.tgdaily.com

NASA's announced its plans for the US spacecraft it hopes will take human beings into deep space.

As expected, the design will be based on its Orion Crew Exploration vehicle, which was originally expected to take Americans back to the moon - until Barack Obama canceled the project last year.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.nasa.gov
www.nasa.gov




posted on May, 25 2011 @ 10:44 AM
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The new design boasts an order of magnitude improvement in safety.


It will have a pressurized volume of 690 cubic feet, with 316 cubic feet of habitable space. It is designed to be 10 times safer during ascent and entry than its predecessor, the space shuttle.




The above artist's rendition of the vehicle shows her orbiting Mars....


It will carry four astronauts for 21-day missions and be able to land in the Pacific Ocean off the California coast. It's expected to be used for missions to Mars and the asteroid belt.


Lockheed Martin has a lot of work ahead of them:




NASA is aiming to launch the MPCV aboard a heavy lift rocket as soon as 2016, although this may be pushing it a bit. However, an announcement on the launch vehicle is expected soon.


As a child I dreamed of being part of a move into space.... maybe that day is approaching, maybe it isn't. Hopefully this new vehicle (although it does look just like the Apollo command module) will be the next step in getting us to be regular visitors within our solar system. Good luck!


www.tgdaily.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 10:55 AM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 


Very interesting!!!

I wish this got more media coverage because it states that we are obviously going to send man beyond the moon, and Mars.....

I'd say that is major news



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 10:59 AM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 


That is incredible! thanks for sharing that info.

With any luck this is the first step to the beginning of a new future, one filled with adventure and learning lol.
Maybe TPTB are finally deciding now is the time for us to get a little something back, maybe there are two sides to every coin?



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 11:02 AM
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not sure if this is a real picture but we will find out soon. looks alot like the apollo if we already had it why cant we do it now



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 11:02 AM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 


wow... cramped in that little thing for months with nothing to really look at or do.

not to mention if something goes wrong, you can't just make a u-turn and come back.... it couldn't be me going out there.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 11:06 AM
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why does every thing we build that ether goes to the ocean or in space look like its made for mice and hamsters nothing ever looks like its suposed to land do they ever intend to not just smack it into the planet or rock or moon 7 hour desent from space slowly gliding till you land or as nasa does it crash



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 11:16 AM
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Does thing have a propulsion system? What in the world? Doesnt look like some deep space craft to me. Looks like a one way ticket to nowhere!! Where are the nuclear or ion powered starships? We certainly have to have something more advanced than this capsule.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 11:19 AM
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Originally posted by BIGSBY13
not sure if this is a real picture but we will find out soon. looks alot like the apollo if we already had it why cant we do it now

The shape is similar, but that is simply because it's the most efficient design capable of re-entry from translunar or greater velocities. The internal systems will be much more advanced, however, and it will be capable of flying more astronauts for longer periods of time than the Apollo command module could have. As for why we can't build it right this minute, it's for the same reason that if we had to right now, we couldn't even build another space shuttle; in many cases the companies that worked to build it either merged or no longer exist, and the infrastructure to build it no longer exists. In a matter of months, the final shuttle will be permanently retired and "safed," meaning its engines, fuel lines, and other hazardous components will be removed. At that point we will no longer be capable of launching a reusable manned spacecraft into orbit. Even though we already did it, we couldn't do it now.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 11:24 AM
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Originally posted by princeofpeace
Does thing have a propulsion system? What in the world? Doesnt look like some deep space craft to me. Looks like a one way ticket to nowhere!! Where are the nuclear or ion powered starships? We certainly have to have something more advanced than this capsule.

The capsule gets you into low earth orbit. The earth departure stage and any additional living space will either be launched separately or as a payload on the same rocket that boosts the capsule into orbit. The capsule will then dock to the earth departure stage (whatever that ends up being) and travel with it. The capsule's main job is getting the astronauts into orbit and then back safely at velocities in excess of 11km/sec.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 11:31 AM
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Do we have any spacecraft that can "turn around" in space or does everything rely on a one-way trajectory altered by the gravitational pull of other bodies to "steer" them?



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 11:39 AM
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Originally posted by princeofpeace
Do we have any spacecraft that can "turn around" in space or does everything rely on a one-way trajectory altered by the gravitational pull of other bodies to "steer" them?

Apollo had "direct abort" capability. The ability of future spacecraft to perform that kind of abort will depend on the nature of their destination and the delta-V afforded by their primary propulsion system. Unlike Apollo, that will not be located on the service module attached to the capsule (though perhaps that could suppliment their delta-V budget if used to abandon their propulsion module after a final propulsion module burn). A direct abort halfway to mars on a mars mission is still going to require a large amount of time to return to earth, so the spacecraft must be designed with enough redundancy to prevent most time-critical emergencies.
edit on 25-5-2011 by ngchunter because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 11:50 AM
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That won't get us anywhere's.

What the scientists are really working on right now is the Fe0 iron on the moon. Apparently they could build a device to emit a little microwaves at the ground and the Fe0 iron will melt together with ease. Allowing you to make very large things right there with little energy.

That's how they will build the real deep space vehicles.

Fe0 iron only exists in space. Strange stuff to us. All the iron here on Earth has been exposed to oxygen, harder to work with. Whatever our next big thing is it will be mainly built by robots on the moon.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 11:53 AM
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What I want to know, is how "deep" can a "deep space" mission go...in 21 days.

The fact that the thing is designed for 4 astronauts on a 21 day mission, to me at least, means this is anything but a deep space vehicle.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 12:01 PM
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So basically "no" we dont have spacecraft that can turn circles in space.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 12:08 PM
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Originally posted by Unit541
What I want to know, is how "deep" can a "deep space" mission go...in 21 days.

The fact that the thing is designed for 4 astronauts on a 21 day mission, to me at least, means this is anything but a deep space vehicle.

Think of the CEV, Orion, MPCV, whatever they want to call it, as simply the ascent, transfer, and re-entry vehicle. There will be additional components that have yet to be unveiled that will be needed in order to complete the mission. The earth departure stage will probably be attached to additional living space which will provide accomidations during coasting phases. A possible destination that was looked at even during the time it was called "constellation" was that of a NEO. It would be about a 90 to 120 day flight, but the time spent in the MPCV itself would be limited to about 3 weeks.
www.digitalspace.com...

The NEO mission itself would require three HLV launches (plus one commercial crew launch) to deploy cryogenic chemical and solar electric propulsion systems, an Orion capsule, a habitation module, and a “Multi Mission Space Exploration Vehicle”. This mission would support approximately six-month journeys to and from an unspecified NEO, with a 30-day stay at the asteroid.

www.thespacereview.com...



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 12:10 PM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 


Now, this is cool.
Let's go out in space!

To boldly go, where nobody have gone before..



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 12:10 PM
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Originally posted by princeofpeace
So basically "no" we dont have spacecraft that can turn circles in space.

Like I said, that will depend on the design of the mission itself. For trips to NEOs the answer will certainly be yes, for trips to Mars the answer is "maybe, but you better not need to turn around anyway."



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 12:34 PM
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I guess im thinking more interms of maneuvering. On long missions the guys might want to come back and not stay in space forever. Having the ability to turn around (not abort) would be useful. Also what if when they are in space they see something off to the right or left that they want to fly up to? The ability to stop, turn, turn around and then speed up again would be useful. I dont think that is so much dictated on the goal of a mission but a capability that they should have regardless.



Originally posted by ngchunter

Originally posted by princeofpeace
So basically "no" we dont have spacecraft that can turn circles in space.

Like I said, that will depend on the design of the mission itself. For trips to NEOs the answer will certainly be yes, for trips to Mars the answer is "maybe, but you better not need to turn around anyway."



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 01:40 PM
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Originally posted by princeofpeace
I guess im thinking more interms of maneuvering. On long missions the guys might want to come back and not stay in space forever. Having the ability to turn around (not abort) would be useful.

A "turn around" and return to earth is called a direct abort.


Also what if when they are in space they see something off to the right or left that they want to fly up to? The ability to stop, turn, turn around and then speed up again would be useful.

Real life space maneuvering is not nearly as simply as it is in star trek. I can't imagine a situation where they would want to do that, but even if they did, without science fiction level propulsion it's not practical to do so.

I dont think that is so much dictated on the goal of a mission but a capability that they should have regardless.

The goal of a mission will dictate how much delta-V is required. That will directly determine the delta-V budget, and thus, the ability to perform direct aborts or other maneuvers at various stages of the mission and in various situations.



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