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Let's start a fire

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posted on May, 25 2011 @ 10:38 AM
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I know this is a basic survival concept but one that intrigues me the most. A survival situation of one is still a survival situation.
What worries me most is if I am stuck with limited gear, how do you start a fire?

I was watching Dual Survival and they said, that using sticks, you still only have a 40% chance of starting a fire.
I thought this was a grim percentage.

Then I learned something I didn't know, one wood has to be softer then other. The bow method is not necessarily better then the spinning of the stick method.

My question(s) for you is:

do you actually know how to start a fire from scratch?
And have done it?

Are there any other methods if you do not have anything flammable on you?




posted on May, 25 2011 @ 10:41 AM
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I just recently learned to start a fire with a nine volt battery and steel wool. Still can't believe it really works, but it is pretty neat.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 10:44 AM
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I can't embed videos because I'm noob but this is a great example of fire building courtesy of Ray Mears.

www.youtube.com...



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 10:47 AM
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reply to post by nixie_nox
 

There are multiple methods for starting a fire. They would vary with the situation. Except for an airplane crash, I cannot conceive of a situation where I would not have my EDC(everyday carry) bag. Even with a plane crash I would have access to the materials needed to start a fire by gathering a few things from the wreckage. I have had good luck with the firebow method, but that requires practice. What types of things do you always carry with you? Are you envisioning a scenario where you are stark naked in the woods with nothing but your brains and body?



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 10:48 AM
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Thinkgeek.com has a cool firesteel knife that I used while camping this summer, works great, •Produces a spark temperature close to 3,000°C (5,500°F), lasts long and it's easy to carry - here's the link- only $30 bucks

www.thinkgeek.com...
edit on 25-5-2011 by mileslong54 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 10:49 AM
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Forget trying to use sticks. 40% chance if you are an expert, maybe. Certain qualities are needed in the wood and you need some type of kindling anyway.

Kindling, which is tiny pieces of dry wood is essential for a survival kit. Along with a fire lighter flint which can be bought at any outdoor store. This isn't always easy either, especially in the wind. Practice, practice, practice before you might need it for real.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 10:54 AM
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reply to post by WeMoveUnseen
 





edit on 25-5-2011 by neonitus because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 10:54 AM
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reply to post by chiefsmom
 


I learned how to use a 9 volt too...come to find out though...any batteries will work. I have uses a single AAA battery with the same effect, the process is similar and using a blade out of a disposable razor works great as an element.

Just thought I would share that little tid bit. I don't think anything replaces a good flint though.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 10:54 AM
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There is way to do it with a car battery and any flammable material, you'd also need jumper cables or a rigged up version of some. Look it up. In a SHTF situation, car batteries should be readily available, at least in formerly populated areas. Lenses/magnifying glasses can be useful, too.

Also- save your dryer lint - great firestarting material!
edit on 25-5-2011 by louieprima because: forgot about dryer lint



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 10:59 AM
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To start fires, a large (lightweight) plastic lens can be useful, and two is better. I have started fires and burned black marks in wood by this method, but you have to have overhead sun.

Your survival pack must include fire-making gear:

wood strike-anywhere matches in a waterproof container
one of those magnesium thingies you see advertised in outdoor magazines
a few BIC lighters
000 steel wool (awesome fire starter) nine volt battery optional
some rolled-up paper towel material dipped in paraffin
stout cord for making fire-drills
a little "scout-juice" doesn't hurt
as said, a lens or two



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 11:06 AM
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reply to post by sonofliberty1776
 


Do you carry your kit wherever you go?

A car going unseen off a road, which happens more then people think.

Hikers getting lost in the woods.

Losing your pack while hiking. If it is a shtf scenario, what if someone steals it from you?



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 11:08 AM
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reply to post by louieprima
 


Actually I do recycle dryer lint into firestarters. I put them in egg crates and melt old candles onto them to make a firestarter for the wood stove.

I will definetly look into all the information that you folks have kindly provided. Thanks!



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 11:11 AM
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the best kit is flint and steel, you can get the mag fire starters or, but i like the old flint steel and char cloth, yes i use it and take it with me. there is also this www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 25-5-2011 by bekod because: added link



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 11:11 AM
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You can up your odds three ways:

1. Practice.
2. Make sure you have full wide contact with both mating surfaces.
3. Cheat. Add sand that has been broken sharp between two rocks.

Rounded weathered sand wont help. You only need a couple of pinches, so use shaking and blowing of the sand to remove powder and retain the crushed, sharp grains. Put it around the bevel in the wood put stick in hole and whack it with a rock to imbed the sharp rough particles in the board and end of the stick.

When it comes to survival:

1. Always have a backup method.
2. Always cheat.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 11:31 AM
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reply to post by Shadowalker
 


I have not heard that. Fascinating.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 11:32 AM
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So I am still interested in hearing any experiences from somebody starting fire from scratch.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 11:39 AM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox

Then I learned something I didn't know, one wood has to be softer then other. The bow method is not necessarily better then the spinning of the stick method.

My question(s) for you is:

do you actually know how to start a fire from scratch?
And have done it?

Are there any other methods if you do not have anything flammable on you?


I have made friction fires many times with bow drill, hand drill and other methods. The bow drill IS the better method as you can spin it faster, longer and harder than you can a hand drill. You need dry wood for your kit, a very sturdy cord (shoe laces will do) and correct form. Practice is the only way as trying this method under emergency conditions is probably a waste of time and energy better spent on creating shelter.

I have a thread on bow drill fire making here;www.abovetopsecret.com...

Who carries 9 volt batteries and steel wool around with them? I have yet to meet anyone who does.
The only other method possible (but not likely) to produce fire would include using lenses to start a fire with sunlight (magnifying glass, binocular or camera lens).

Learning the traditional method at least gives you a practical fallback if you have absolutely nothing.
It's not easy but can be learned by anyone with a bit of patience.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 11:40 AM
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I carry the following in my pack:

1. bow cordage.
2. 2 bic lighters
3. Scripto Vue lighter. spare flints and striker assembly
4. 4oz can of lighter fluid.
5. Strike Force steel.

People that are in the know pick this one for SHTF. There are smaller, lighter weight ones but it has a very beefy rod that wont break. You want the largest diameter rod for long term. The little swedish ones can snap on you once they have been shaved thinner.
www.rei.com...

Bic warning. Put a couple in an altoids tin with some paper towel to keep them from rattling. I did a 3 mile remote hike and found that the single lighter I carried, had shifter and the gas had released and it was empty. I tried a bow but there wasn't suitable wood. Thats why they tell you to take the bow set with you from place to place. after I gave up I found a large rock with a depression and poured stove fuel into it and struck rocks together for about 5 min to make a good spark. 5 min is a long time to be striking rocks and hoping for the best. It did light, but then again they were the wrong kind of rocks to get a good spark right away. Like the wood, everywhere out there doesnt supply exactly what you need.

I could have done the 6 mi round trip back to the car for another lighter, but now I know to carry a pretty good set of things.

Im on the fence, but the design and machining is state of the art and has a high enough pressure to use cat tail fluff and decaying wood instead of having to worry about char cloth. $75 but the design and only needing a couple O rings for repairs.....should last a lifetime or two.

www.youtube.com...://www.youtube.com/watch?v=51VJHjGEQ9A&feature=player_embedded
edit on 25-5-2011 by Shadowalker because: add info



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 11:44 AM
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I have practiced the bow drill method a lot, and have become pretty good at it. Not nearly as good as Mr. Cody, but still pretty good. I have not yet made cordage from scratch, but I always wear shoes, and I only own shoes with laces. Boot laces to be exact, each one being about 18-20" longer than it really needs to be for me to a tie a knot. So I could just cut a piece of lace.

In addition to that skill, my keychain has a steel match on it, and I always carry a knife. So I can't imagine a situation where I wouldn't be able to start a fire, assuming there is dry tinder and other combustible material.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 12:24 PM
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reply to post by James1982
 


Even with wet tinder Dual Survival does mention a couple of ways around that particular problem. for example get the driest stuff you can and put it in a pocket. This will make firestarting easier.



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