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Motherboard Question

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posted on May, 24 2011 @ 02:35 PM
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I was reading up a recent topic about computers here and many were suggesting the building of your own computer being the best option, that reminded me of something I wanted to do some time ago. I wanted to use a server motherboard for a PC. I am computer savvy to a certain extent, to be honest I have not kept up with all the new stuff that keeps coming out every second it seems, so I am still very limited as far as knowledge of the matter, I am however the person my friends and family come to when they are having computer problems, and when they need repairs or upgrades or virus elimination etc...

Either way, back then (about 2-3 years ago) when I asked around I was sure I could do it, hoping to use the multiple processors and extra RAM for my demanding computer tasks, whether rendering 3D, animations, video etc..

At first most people said it couldn't be done, one guy at a Micro center (last year) even laughed at me when I inquired about the parts. I know there is a way it can be done, I have now learned that it is very possible but there are some restrictions as far as the OS recognizing the processors and RAM etc..

I wanted to see about getting a motherboard with 4 CPU slots and perhaps having 4 quad core processors in each hehe.

Has anyone done something like this? or does anyone know of someone who has?

ANY help/info ideas would be appreciated.




posted on May, 24 2011 @ 02:44 PM
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you'd have to find a server motherboard that would support four, quad-core processors. . . find one of those & you should be set. . . .I would assume a motherboard of this nature would have plenty of support for loads of memory modules . . .

but i really don't know without doing the research

found a link from nearly a year ago explaining some of the technical obstacles you would need to overcome, such as server grade memory, specific xeon and opteron processors, etc. . . .
www.tomshardware.com...
edit on 24-5-2011 by lurker007 because: link added



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 02:45 PM
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reply to post by Majestic Lumen
 


I guess it depends on what kind of server you're talking about. Most small businesses and smaller organizations have servers that are really no different than any other PC, the main difference is the OS that is used (usually Windows Server 2003 or 2008). These servers may have more than one NIC or a better power supply, but that is really the only difference. If you are talking about a motherboard from a more advanced server you may have a problem hooking up graphics cards and other hardware to a server motherboard because they aren't designed for it. They certainly have the power and capability, but a server motherboard won't have the connections needed for the other hardware that you will find on a regular PC. The BIOS and CMOS are also much different than that of a regular motherboard.



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 02:49 PM
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reply to post by Majestic Lumen
 


Stating you have a "server mainboard and memory" doesn't really leave me much to give you advice on.

How about you give a more precise description, are they for example Intel Xeon CPU's ? Those were commonly used in servers a couple years back. When it's standard stuff, all you need is server chassis, but you don't want to do that because server fans will be loud as a hoover. They don't stand in sound proof boxes for no reason.

My gut feeling tells me you'd be better off with picking a brand new mainboard. For a fairly decent new machine you would spend around 500$ without screen, so what's the big deal ?



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 02:55 PM
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I want to thank everyone for the replies. I have since settled with just upgrading what ever I get my hands on, I just wanted to sort of build a "super computer" some what hehe. And yeah these days the boards coming out have more to work with.

I just had that need for speed when working on projects is all, because waiting a long time for something to render is a pain in the butt.

Again thanx for the info and links, I really appreciate it. I'm gonna do some homework dust off the old cobwebs from my brain, and get started with the info from here



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 02:55 PM
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reply to post by Majestic Lumen
 


Take a look at this Motherboard.

TYAN 4 CPU motherboard


TYAN S8812WGM3NR Quad Socket G34 AMD SR5690 MEB Quad AMD 8-Core/12-Core Opteron 6100 Series Processors (Magny-Cours) Server Motherboard


Or if you do not need that beefy Motherboard.
There are plenty more options here.

Newegg's Server Motherboards



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 02:58 PM
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reply to post by Majestic Lumen
 


It's almost nonsense to say that this can't be done, with the one caveat that often server boards are extended ATX sized & won't fit in a common workstation case. I've personally built at least 3 16-core systems (4slot * 4core) for running scientific simulation software. The cost of these systems ranged from $8000 to $14000 a piece, with the majority of pricetag being the quad-core Xeon processors.

I used the Thermaltake Stacker 800 (and later 810) case, which was the only one I found which could hold the quad-socket Tyan boards available at the time. The boards were very similar to the Tyan S4989WG2NR-SI, but I don't have the exact part number & they appear to not be available anymore - maybe good news for you anyway since AMD chips are cheaper.

Keep in mind you'll need a pretty beefy power supply (800W or better) with two proc power connectors in order to use all four processor sockets. You will also need an operating system capable of utilizing the number of cores you have installed. I'm not sure about Windows 7, but when I built these it had to be 2008 Server if you wanted Windows - Linux of course never had a problem.
edit on 24-5-2011 by gotmonkey because: Better desciption



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 03:00 PM
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Originally posted by H1ght3chHippie
reply to post by Majestic Lumen
 


Stating you have a "server mainboard and memory" doesn't really leave me much to give you advice on.



That's the thing I didn't have any of that, it's when I inquired which ones would be able to pull it off I was laughed at hehe. I figured there might be something somewhere in between, like Optimus stated

Originally posted by OptimusSubprime
reply to post by Majestic Lumen
 

Most small businesses and smaller organizations have servers that are really no different than any other PC, the main difference is the OS that is used (usually Windows Server 2003 or 2008).

Perhaps there was a middle ground.



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 03:07 PM
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reply to post by tomten
 


Sweet deal, thanks for the link


reply to post by gotmonkey
 


I knew it wasn't impossible. That's what I'm talking about.

Good info from everyone, I really got a lot of brushing up to do lol

....looking back, computers have come a long way since playing Oregon Trail in grammar school lol that was when I first used a computer haha



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 03:10 PM
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reply to post by Majestic Lumen
 


If I am reading this correctly, you are doing 3D rendering? 4 quad-core CPUs is overkill. I work in the IT industry and I can tell you nothing more than a high-end HP workstation (like a Z800) with a high end graphics card (ATI FirePro V8800) would do the trick. You could easily build something similar.



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 03:13 PM
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reply to post by richiev
 


See there is where my lack of keeping up with all this comes in and there is where I am at fault, I've gone down to just doing small minor work on computers, everything changes so fast.



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 03:44 PM
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reply to post by Majestic Lumen
 


It is hard to keep up. Intel now has 10 core CPUs which can run 20 threads. AMD has 12 core CPUs now. And I'm sure by the time I finish writing this they bumped those cores 2 fold! Lol



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 03:51 PM
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4 quad cores in each?

What would be the point of that, no program or game needs that kinda power.... that i know of at least


Ye best invest in a heavy duty cooling system too...

Hell, attach it to your fridge!


edit on 24-5-2011 by Akragon because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 06:20 PM
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supermicro has some "cat's meow" boards and cabinets !


www.supermicro.com...



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 10:31 AM
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reply to post by Akragon
 


lol I've heard about someone using liquid nitrogen in a cooling system, it was probably a joke, it'd be cool though if you had a steady supply of it and could keep something like that running.

I've also read about dipping and running under mineral oil.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 11:48 AM
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Originally posted by Majestic Lumen
reply to post by Akragon
 


lol I've heard about someone using liquid nitrogen in a cooling system, it was probably a joke, it'd be cool though if you had a steady supply of it and could keep something like that running.

I've also read about dipping and running under mineral oil.


No joke..
It's been tested.
But is overkill.. :-)




posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 11:24 PM
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reply to post by tomten
 


Funny watching what they had to do back in 2006 just to hit 5ghz in that video. My gaming machine right now is sitting at 5.12 on a really good air setup.



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