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The Pink Meanie: Cannibal Jellyfish

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posted on May, 24 2011 @ 11:34 AM
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My girlfriend loves jellyfish and I was sending her this so I thought I'd share, she wasn't happy when she found out it eats other Jellyfish



Off the Florida Keys (map), hundreds of stinging tentacles dangle from a "pink meanie"—a new species of jellyfish with a taste for other jellies.

When pink meanies were first observed in large numbers in the Gulf of Mexico (map) in 2000, they were though to be Drymonema dalmatinum, a species known since the late 1800s and usually found in the Mediterranean Sea, the Caribbean Sea, and off the Atlantic coast of South America.

Recently, though, scientists using genetic techniques and visual examinations have revealed that this pink meanie is an entirely new species—Drymonema larsoni, named after scientist Ron Larson, who did some of the first work on the species in the Caribbean. (Related: "'City of Gonads' Jellyfish Discovered.")

Moreover, the pink meanie appears to be so different from other known scyphozoans, or "true jellyfish," that it forced the scientists to create a whole new animal family, a biological designation two levels above species. The new scyphozoan family—the first since 1921—is called Drymonematidae and includes all Drymonema species.

"They're just off by themselves," said Keith Bayha, a marine biologist at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab in Alabama.

"As we started to really examine Drymonema both genetically and morphologically, it quickly became clear that they're not like other jellyfish and are in their own family."

Bayha and Michael Dawson, an expert on the evolutionary history of marine creatures at the University of California, Merced, detail the new Drymonema jellyfish species and family in the current issue of the journal the Biological Bulletin.

—Ker Than

Published January 24, 2011


news.nationalgeographic.com...




edit on 24-5-2011 by mileslong54 because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 24 2011 @ 11:41 AM
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reply to post by mileslong54
 


Interesting......

those are beautiful photographs by the way!



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 11:42 AM
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Awesome Pics...

I hate the bastards.... Ruined many of summer beginnings in Ocean City MD when I lived there.

I do have one good memory of them. A guy I didn't like but was a brother of a friend of mine (you know-the pesty type one). Anyway, he dove down under and came up screaming a few moments later.

When he came up, we saw one on his Chest. He was freaking out.


It wasn't this big but I sure hoped it was...
)



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 11:43 AM
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I wonder why jellyfish are classifed like other organisms. They are a colony of seperate organisms. Each having a specific function.



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 11:46 AM
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reply to post by anon72
 


Wow, that's a huge Jellyfish I will have to send that to my girlfriend, very cool I have never seen one that big!



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 11:48 AM
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reply to post by mileslong54
 


That picture is a fake, I checked it out a few years ago.



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 12:16 PM
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reply to post by earthdude
 

Fake you say?

I believe they're Nomura's jellyfish.
edit on 24-5-2011 by Xtraeme because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 03:09 PM
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Although a different species, it's interesting to note that the deep sea siphonophore can reach 130 feet long.... it's body is thin, but the mass is impressive.

We have got a long way to go understanding the Jellyfish in general. Especially the mid-ocean varieties.

We're not done learning yet.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 03:31 PM
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reply to post by mileslong54
 

That is an awesome looking jellyfish, even though I am scared of them. I did have a good experience with jellyfish. I saw a bunch of moon jellyfish on the sand at Ocean Beach by San Fran. Me and my friend had a jellyfish fight and throw them at each other. They were already dead. They didn't sting. I would be scared of the jellyfish in the picture and sea nettles. I saw a sea nettle at that beach also, that thing scared me.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 03:40 PM
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Originally posted by Chopper
reply to post by mileslong54
 

That is an awesome looking jellyfish, even though I am scared of them. I did have a good experience with jellyfish. I saw a bunch of moon jellyfish on the sand at Ocean Beach by San Fran. Me and my friend had a jellyfish fight and throw them at each other. They were already dead. They didn't sting. I would be scared of the jellyfish in the picture and sea nettles. I saw a sea nettle at that beach also, that thing scared me.


There are a lot of deadly one too, ranging from tiny like the box jellyfish to big like the man of war jellyfish ones that kill you in like a half an hour. I've seen a man of war while deep sea fishing of the California coast pretty creepy looking. I've been stung a couple of times surfing but in Southern California most jellyfish are the stinging kinda and you can get your friend to pee on it or deal with the pain, I choose the pain.



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