Unit 1 nuclear power plant fukushima...TIME TO RUN...

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posted on May, 24 2011 @ 01:06 PM
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reply to post by TupacShakur
 


The half-life of strontium-90 is 30 years.

Yeah, we're screwed.




posted on May, 24 2011 @ 01:24 PM
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Only mortals fear death.



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 01:33 PM
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Originally posted by Dalke07
Any news for No.4 ??

This is last readings for Fukushima Daiichi ..

2011-05-24 11:49:19.

325.000 uSv/h = 325 Sv
edit on 24-5-2011 by Dalke07 because: (no reason given)


No. 325,000 uSv/h = 325 mSv/h = .325 SV/h. Still bad but not deadly unless your there too long. 300 SV/h is what a fissioning core is at and we shouldn't see that number anywhere but inside the actual reactor.

Pred...



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 02:01 PM
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Originally posted by sandesh


Check out this link: atmc.jp...

Symptoms of acute radiation (dose received within one day):
0 – 0.25 Sv (0 – 250 mSv): None
0.25 – 1 Sv (250 – 1000 mSv): Some people feel nausea and loss of appetite; bone marrow, lymph nodes, spleen damaged.
1 – 3 Sv (1000 – 3000 mSv): Mild to severe nausea, loss of appetite, infection; more severe bone marrow, lymph node, spleen damage; recovery probable, not assured.
3 – 6 Sv (3000 – 6000 mSv): Severe nausea, loss of appetite; hemorrhaging, infection, diarrhea, peeling of skin, sterility; death if untreated.
6 – 10 Sv (6000 – 10000 mSv): Above symptoms plus central nervous system impairment; death expected.
Above 10 Sv (10000 mSv): Incapacitation and death.

REACTOR UNIT 1 IS 20 TIMES HIGHER THAN THE AMOUNT THAT WILL CAUSE INCAPACITATION AND DEATH!

Live stream of the plant...

edit on 23-5-2011 by sandesh because: (no reason given)



Update : enenews.com...
70,000 more “must evacuate around Fukushima” extra DIV
extra DIV



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 02:05 PM
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Bloomberg News wire is saying TEPCO is announcing that 2 more Nuclear Meltdowns have occurred at Fukishima. I am watching it on satelite at home, it is 12:07p.m. PST. Channel 353 on Direct TV.



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 03:19 PM
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The fact that they are running a continuous live feed on this plant is worrying. If you follow the link to YouTube Japan, within the embed, you can get access to the feed.

Anyone with a screen record program and a humongous hard drive can start recording now.



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 03:52 PM
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I don't know how much this poster can be relied upon, but this post (quoted in part) from another forum is very ominous:

enenews.com...


Given previous posts on this forum it seems we now how about six hours (from 3:08 PM, don't know the time zone) before the corium eats its way through the six feet of concrete in the floor of this secondary containment. Then 15 feet through soil to reach the water table. If that happens it will be KABOOM steam explosion time as this nuclear magma can reach 5,000 degrees Centigrade.

Then like Emmy notes we have a nuclear radiation fountain, an old faithful gusher.

Before it is over we may have three of them – side-by-side.



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 03:58 PM
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Originally posted by ipsedixit
I don't know how much this poster can be relied upon, but this post (quoted in part) from another forum is very ominous:

enenews.com...


Given previous posts on this forum it seems we now how about six hours (from 3:08 PM, don't know the time zone) before the corium eats its way through the six feet of concrete in the floor of this secondary containment. Then 15 feet through soil to reach the water table. If that happens it will be KABOOM steam explosion time as this nuclear magma can reach 5,000 degrees Centigrade.

Then like Emmy notes we have a nuclear radiation fountain, an old faithful gusher.

Before it is over we may have three of them – side-by-side.




Rubbish. Why now as it has been melted down since right after the tsunami? It has way over to months butbthis guy is saying in 6 hours?

They continue to spray in water and the reading from the reactors show no temperatures around 5000 degrees. I think all the molten mass is in water at the moment as we see steam coming off the reactors.

Spreading fear that's all that post was...

Pred...



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 04:17 PM
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Originally posted by Blazer
EDIT: Just to make this post an actual useful comment. I'd like to say that this data without context is useless. Where was the reading taken? If it is inside the reactor, no big deal. If it is outside, then that is quite bad.


I'm certainly not an expert on this, but my understanding is that this reading could mean a few things, all of them very bad. Obviously if the reading is outside of the containment vessel then the worst-case scenario is underway- full environmental contamination. If the reading is taken inside the containment vessel, it's still very bad. If you read the chart you'll see it was running around 30 Sv/h and then suddenly on the 21st spiked to 200 Sv/h and as of today is still there. The sudden spike could indicate that the core has melted through the reactor and into the containment vessel. Even if the reading is inside the reactor, a jump like that still says something is very wrong. It's possible that the cooling water has boiled off and the core is exposed again. Even though the core has already melted down, if it isn't kept cooled it will resume the melting process. If and when the core breaches the containment vessel there's no containing it.


Originally posted by benjoepen
reply to post by merkaba93
 


Actually water is the main ingredient that works to make cement/concrete dry. My neighbor once ran over in a fluster because he had just done the brick work on his home extension and it has started to rain very soon after. He was worried about the water not allowing the cement to dry I does fly in the face of logic but its is ziss vay.


Just to clarify, water is an ingredient in concrete (along with cement and aggregate) and the evaporation of the water is what cures the concrete. It doesn't make the concrete "dry", "cure" is a better word. If concrete strength is coming up light in a compression test you can actually wet the concrete again to get it to cure some more (although it won't make up for a large deficiency). It doesn't hurt concrete if it gets wet while it's curing (assuming it has already set up before the rain starts), but it will slow the curing process down. Masonry work doesn't use concrete, it uses "mortar" which is cement/ sand and water. Mortar is basically just a bonding agent, so it's not subjected to 7 & 21 day compressive strength tests like concrete is.



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 04:56 PM
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reply to post by bhornbuckle75
 


Actually if you look at the Red Forest on the outskirts of Pripyat (just outside chernobyl) the radiation levels are certain to kill any person, but the flora/fauna of that area are thriving (due to the lack of human disturbances funnily enough lol). So my humble opinion is that the wildlife will be fine, but we won't. (Just look up Pripyat on wiki and u should find it)



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 05:01 PM
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Another thing I really don't understand about the work they're doing on fukushima is, why would they keep spraying water on the bloody thing? It would just bloody evaporate as soon as it touches the nuclear material. IMO they should have just dumped tons of bentonite into the reactor with helicopters (like they did to stop the reactions in Chernobyl #4). Throwing water on it is just gonna aggravate the problem. I honestly believe the reactors wouldn't have even blown if it wasn't for the Hydrogen buildup from the light water they were pumping in when they KNEW there were ruptures inside the reactors themselves. It's just pure bloody stupidity in my eyes.
edit on 24/5/2011 by xXxinfidelxXx because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 05:42 PM
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reply to post by predator0187
 


I for one, hope that the post is rubbish.

Obviously, I am just a layperson, but it seems to me that only one thing could account for a surge in the radiation readings at the plant. That would be a change in the physical disposition of the nuclear fuel, which has resulted in more fissionable material coming into closer proximity.

Assuming that the monitoring equipment is working properly, then we can take it as a given that something physical has changed within the reactor to bring fuel closer together.

Here is one scenario. Concrete in the containment vessel of the reactor has deteriorated because of a combination of heat and radioactivity. Because of the water being pumped into the vessel, the heat has hitherto not been excessive for more than short periods. However with the passage of time, even this lower level of heat, together with continued radioactive decay of the fuel has caused a noticeable erosion of the concrete under the fuel.

This erosion has created a depression into which melted fuel has begun to settle. The effect of this is twofold: one, there is a speedup of the nuclear fission process due to the gathering of fuel into a pocket which concentrates fissionable material, thus increasing the rate of the reaction, thus increasing the radiation readouts.

The second effect of this situation is to create a physical deployment of the fuel like one would see of soup in a bowl. The cooling water would now be unable to reach part of the fuel and would be less effective, like blowing on the surface of a bowl of soup, rather than being able to aerate the whole mass. This leads to increased heat, and increased deterioration of the containment vessel from both the increased heat and the accelerated reaction.

This is extremely serious and could lead to the scenario predicted in the post I quoted.

Reliable information has been scarce from the beginning of the Fukushima incident, for a number of reasons, some of which are beyond the control of the authorities. Obviously all of us are hypothesizing to some extent, but the sudden surge in radiation levels, if not the result of a failure of monitoring systems, has got to signal a significant physical change within the reactor.



edit on 24-5-2011 by ipsedixit because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 06:32 PM
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is that a fire shooting out the corner of the only intact building on the live feed? just got home. sorry if this has been covered.


ETA aaaaand theyre panning away from it...
edit on 24-5-2011 by Urantia1111 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 06:41 PM
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Originally posted by Urantia1111
is that a fire shooting out the corner of the only intact building on the live feed? just got home. sorry if this has been covered.


ETA aaaaand theyre panning away from it...
edit on 24-5-2011 by Urantia1111 because: (no reason given)


I posted about it in the other thread... It certainly looks like it!



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 06:44 PM
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I swear,, sometimes it looks like a nuclear explosion caught in a time warp,, just when u think ,, opps their it goes,,,,,,then back too,,, ok,,, didnt blow big (real big,,,bigger) brown poo-poo boom thing???

or it could be a quark cught in a nutreno? lol htfk's,,, It's UNCHARTED territory,, know one really knows.



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 06:46 PM
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Yeah, there appears to be a very bright flame or white light at the corner of the building on the left.

2nd.



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 06:52 PM
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and now theyre randomly panning all over the site...away from the brand new flaming hole. i notice smoke too. so this is a relatively new development?



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 07:29 PM
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There is no worries here. They have it under total control and the radiation levels are fine. The men working over there are doing just fine. No medical problems. No worries here.



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 07:41 PM
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So thats 3 unidentified, ----------->unit 4 top right, bottom.
3 top centre
4, top right ,middle right.

Correct?



posted on May, 24 2011 @ 08:33 PM
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NHK world news in English is not reporting any special developments at Fukushima. It said that they have just started to monitor the discharge of radioactive particles from the plants by means of instruments attached to the cranes which hold the hoses feeding water into the tops of the reactor buildings. There is no mention of fires.

I think we might just be seeing jets of water being lit up by floodlights and looking like flames from a distance.

Apparently Tepco is going to try to cover the buildings with polyester sheets to impede the escape of radioactive elements from the buildings.

They don't mention a surge of radiation at any of the reactors.
edit on 24-5-2011 by ipsedixit because: (no reason given)





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