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ECONOMY: Jobs for the middle class is not the issue.

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posted on Aug, 3 2004 @ 12:08 PM
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If you were to review the Kerry/Edwards website summary on a stronger economy you get the impression their primary focus will be "jobs for the middle class." A fine anthem for the Democrats. While, on the other side of the fence, Bush's Six Point Plan seems a bit... unfocused. Just what is a thinking centrist to do?
 
Why... loot to history of course. We have two very important moments in history to review, and learn from; 1) The boom from electricity from 1903-1930, and 2) The boom from digital technology from 1970 to 2000. And even before then, you can trace this country's massive initial growth spurt to a combination of the Industrial Revolution and a massively liberal immigration policy. What can we learn from history you may ask... why, that history repeats, of course. So far, neither of the two major platforms seem to be aware of what occurs after a boom-and-bust cycle from an economic sense. Change happens. Sometimes catastrophic change that may result in a power-base shift. The "golden age of power", or the electricity boom, heralded an economic power shift from Europe the the United States. The digital boom-and-bust may herald a similar economic power shift, away from the United Stages to Pacific Rim countries. Unless our candidates show they understand what may be about to occur, we may be in for a very rough 20 years as we adjust. What do our fine Dem, Rep, Libertarian, Green friends make of this? How do we avoid history?




posted on Aug, 3 2004 @ 01:07 PM
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If we keep with our currently enacted policies, China is quickly becoming the source of all the worlds major manufacturing and will continue to head in that direction unless change is made.

The Libertarian party believes that we can keep our economy going by cutting back on government regulators. The parties stance is summed up in this article, badnarik.org...

By allowing the rich to invest money the way they want, more jobs could be created in high-tech sectors because that is where all the money is coming from. The rich, wanting to make more money would invest in high-tech companies, in turn creating new jobs for people to work at. The main problem with this is that the American education system becomes the real issue. The responsiblilty becomes that of the Education system to produce workers capable of functioning in a high-tech job. When the American Educational system is incapable of doing that, companies must then turn overseas. And we see that happening today. Many jobs dealing with programming from US companies are going to India, a country that is adapting quickly to meet the demanding high-tech environment. So what do I say to do about it from a Libertarian perspective? Boost the educational system in America by making sure everyone can go to college through tax cuts and tax incentives. Also making more grants avaliable to everyone and less federal control (ie... No Child Left Behind) over elementary education.



posted on Aug, 3 2004 @ 01:19 PM
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A level of regulation is needed to prod an economy toward a mutually agreed upon goal. Throughout the past 5 years, we've seen the results of poor regulation, and not-enough regulation in business and equities exchanges. The mistakes of Enron and the dot-com bubble may easily be repeated with rampant greed and over-speculation that often goes hand-in-hand with limited regulation. Our governance policy should include short and far-sighted goals that promote not just high-tech, but the research that will lead to the next big bubble, biotech. Corporations that spend heavily in research and development toward these goals need new and significant tax breaks. And likewise, corporations that are currently producing the high-tech goods and services need federal and local programs to help them maintain competitive advantage, and train new workers. If we allow a minimum of regulation, we'll just see more offshoring as there will be no incentives for large corporations to remain here and grow.



posted on Aug, 3 2004 @ 02:18 PM
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The ever instructional passage of time certainly holds ominous portent to our future economic well being. The key to successfully navigating the world's largest economy through the dangerous waters of post economic revolution era has been elusive, and transition intervals can't be relegated to mere chance. World War Two was a product of such a period, failing economies caused the populace to look to anyone who will stand up and promise a "quick fix"; President Bush offers an answer for today, and a vision for the future.


Excerpt from source
“America’s economy is getting stronger. I am optimistic about our future, not only because of what I see today, but because of what I know we have overcome.”
-President George W. Bush, Remarks at Central Piedmont Community College, Charlotte, North Carolina, April 5, 2004



A lesson well taken, President Bush’s Issue Brief On Strengthening The Economy details the Republican plan for continuing the current economic growth, and provides a comprehensive strategy that will carry this growth and prosperity into the future, across economic strata, and fuel the not only our economy, but the global economic markets.


Excerpt from source
Strengthening the Economy – The economy is strong and getting stronger. The President’s pro-growth policies have helped drive the economy and move the recovery forward, putting more money in the pockets of America’s families and laying a foundation for robust growth and job creation now and for years to come.
• GDP grew by more than 5 percent over the last three quarters, the fastest rate of growth in nearly two decades.
• Productivity grew at the fastest 3-year rate in more than 50 years.


While current economic growth is desirable, the need to plan for future economic success is incumbent upon this presidential election’s winner. President Bush has put together a an initiative to prepare our current workforce, and the generation preparing to enter the workforce; that will expand America’s ability to compete within the global marketplace.


Excerpt from source
Helping prepare workers for 21st Century jobs – Many of the new jobs being created require new skills. The President is committed to helping American workers acquire the skills necessary to access those good-paying jobs. His budget commits $23 billion for job training and employment assistance in programs throughout the government. He has proposed more than $500 million for his Jobs for the 21st Century initiative to help prepare U.S. workers to take advantage of the better skilled, higher-paying jobs of the future. This initiative includes $250 million for America’s community colleges to train workers for industries that are creating new jobs today, as well as funding for new secondary education programs to better prepare high school students for the jobs of the 21st Century.


The future economic policy under President Bush is focused, with deliberate purpose, and with the long term success of America's economy as his goal.



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