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What Is The Internet Hiding?

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posted on May, 20 2011 @ 03:29 AM
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Originally posted by THE_PROFESSIONAL
When I search something, I want it all. That means all 372 million webpages. It is up to me to decide what is relevant to me, not google or facebook.



So if you were supreme dictator of google, how would you handle locally important searches like
"tv guide"
"election"
"police"
"suicide support helpline"
or more controvertially...
"child porn images"

Would you really throw them all up in a heap without any filtering at all?




posted on May, 20 2011 @ 03:36 AM
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reply to post by THE_PROFESSIONAL
 


Interesting, I got the 400 000 000 results without changing my location, UK, it is set as an auto location and as far as I can see can only be changed to alternate UK locations, London and Glasgow both gave me 400 000 000.



posted on May, 20 2011 @ 03:36 AM
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Google results have been personalized for like 5 years now (?)
It uses you location and previously visited site and searches.



posted on May, 20 2011 @ 03:42 AM
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Originally posted by THE_PROFESSIONAL
reply to post by Nuker
 



It is almost as if americans are being forced to the nytimes results.
edit on 20-5-2011 by THE_PROFESSIONAL because: (no reason given)

No its almost like the NYT is a very popular website in America.

So it comes up as top results often.

In canada it is CBC. ..

Censorship !

edit on 20-5-2011 by LikeDuhObviously because: (no reason given)



Originally posted by THE_PROFESSIONAL
reply to post by Bixxi3
 


When I search something, I want it all. That means all 372 million webpages. It is up to me to decide what is relevant to me, not google or facebook.


Here you go ..
www.altavista.com...
Google is a company they can use all the features they want to use.
They have no obligations to make sure you get the results you want the way you want. I think they got a pretty decent business model, no ? Who the hell are you to tell them how there product should work ?
edit on 20-5-2011 by LikeDuhObviously because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 20 2011 @ 07:12 AM
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....Really? ... We have to have this discussion?

Back when I first started using the internet, you had Yahoo, Metacrawler, and Google MAY have -just- been in its infancy.

Anyway - what made Google popular were two things. First - Google's design and process of organizing the returned query by terms of relevance. Second - the website is easy to remember for all ages, and rather simple to type in (even for hunt-and-peckers).

Now, I was taught to search the internet the real way by my father - back when you got bombarded by innumerable links of irrelevance. For this, you use boolean operators, and syntax operators.

? is any single character.
* is any string of contiguous characters (IE - ACYUEAKD85)
AND (+) indicates two strings that must be present to validate a return.
OR indicates either string validates a return.
" " specifies a string.
NOT (-) indicates a string to exclude (pages containing this string will not be returned)
( ) establishes operation sequence

Usually, when you search, you'll type in two words. The system searches for "[word 1]" AND "[word 2]." This means that the two words can be present anywhere in the page to have it returned in the query. For example, if you wanted to search for a Search Engine - you could simply type that in. More than likely, the first returns would be a wikipedia article about search engines or what not. However, if you scroll down the page, you'll eventually start seeing results taken from forums with people asking things like: "Can anyone help me search for a new engine for my RC car?"

In that particular example (the only thing I could think up at the time), you likely got what you wanted. However, there can be times when you want to search for something in a specific order. Let's say you want to look up an old friend of yours. Typing John Smith into the search box is going to bring up lists that have "John" and "Smith" somewhere within them. "John Sanches" "Lucy Smith" - for example. Neither of whom are your old friend.

That's where the " " operation comes in handy. Typing "John Smith" (using the quotation marks) is going to be much more likely to return a listing with your friend. But, let's say you're getting a lot of John Smiths in Australia - and you're fairly certain your friend is still living somewhere in the U.S. Adding: Not Australia to your search will remove all mention of people in Australia from your search results. The " " operator is also very useful for searching song lyrics or for material you suspect is plagiarized.

Generally - Google will try to match listings and subject matter near your locale (which is often established through a simple traceroute network function that identifies your ISP and the various server nodes you hail from). It's google's way of making the internet more user friendly and provide you with the information you want on the first page of results, rather than buried twenty pages down amongst sites from Japan and other character sets of indecipherable scribbles.

That's why knowing how to use a search engine is very important in today's world. Simply using a " " operator can reduce the number of results from tens of thousands to less than twenty. The amount of data estimated to be generated on the internet every minute is measured in gigabytes. There's no way you are going to be able to pour through millions upon millions of websites looking for the information you need. You can almost instantly filter out millions of sites that have nothing to do with what you are looking for so that you spend less time searching blindly.

www.lib.berkeley.edu...

Usually, people spend most of their time trying to filter the internet so they can get to what they are looking for. It's not that google blocks things based on where you are - it is merely that it tries to give people what it determines (mathematically) they are likely to find relevant - and give you those results first.



posted on May, 20 2011 @ 07:19 AM
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I thought this was pretty common knowledge? typically tailoring search results based of information gleamed from your spending/browsing habits. IMO it only enhances the google experience and its not like there aren't quick ways around it!



posted on May, 20 2011 @ 01:28 PM
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400000000 results here
im not in europe
not in cali or in ny or in fl or in texas.
but i am somewhere

edit on 20-5-2011 by reedbananaboat because: 2nd line



posted on May, 20 2011 @ 02:27 PM
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Originally posted by theUNKNOWNawaits
Googled searched egypt.

Got 369 million results.


Googled egypt again today.

Got 87,500,000 results this time.
edit on 5/20/2011 by theUNKNOWNawaits because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 20 2011 @ 10:59 PM
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reply to post by theUNKNOWNawaits
 


See, i bet its the top thousand or so results that are customized for you. Who cares about the last million. If that is even accurate. I seriously wonder how much data google has. Stuff that was not meant to be seen by us.



posted on May, 20 2011 @ 11:32 PM
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I got 366,000,000 results.



posted on May, 20 2011 @ 11:39 PM
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reply to post by THE_PROFESSIONAL
 


Generally speaking, sites you are "not supposed to see" don't appear on Google, because the servers hosting such pages and information are not connected to the internet - or require security certificates and/or password logon to access (such as a number of NIPR sites used for administrative purposes and self-management of military records).

Similarly, the bank's local network of computers and work-groups are isolated from the internet virtually or physically, and Google would not show you Tammy Longren's new budget analysis.

Contrary to Hollyweird information network theory - you can't get access to any computer and any file using the internet.



posted on May, 21 2011 @ 03:32 AM
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Originally posted by Avyuir
I got 366,000,000 results.


You're trapped in the 366 mill null zone, for a small consideration I could allow you access to my little pile of 34 million pages on Egypt, as I say offers open to any who live in censoredville.



posted on May, 21 2011 @ 04:52 AM
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Google search for me gave 967 000 000 for Egypt





edit on 21-5-2011 by vesta because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 21 2011 @ 05:06 AM
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reply to post by Aim64C
 



Now, I was taught to search the internet the real way by my father - back when you got bombarded by innumerable links of irrelevance. For this, you use boolean operators, and syntax operators.


My chemistry teacher was genuinely surprised when I showed him one didn't need all those fancy dots and whatnot connecting strings together to search for a relevant bit of information. He was stood there not believing it for a few minutes. So this. Too much paranoia on the boards these days.



posted on May, 21 2011 @ 02:54 PM
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Originally posted by theUNKNOWNawaits

Originally posted by theUNKNOWNawaits
Googled searched egypt.

Got 369 million results.


Googled egypt again today.

Got 87,500,000 results this time.
edit on 5/20/2011 by theUNKNOWNawaits because: (no reason given)


Ok, googled egypt for a third day now.

This time I got 401 million results.

3 days, 3 different amount of results. And there was no change in settings or location.
edit on 5/21/2011 by theUNKNOWNawaits because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 21 2011 @ 05:33 PM
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reply to post by theUNKNOWNawaits
 


Google uses mathematical formulas to assign relevance to search criteria. A simple word like "Egypt" is going to return this thread.

However, Google uses a lot of factors to determine how to display the results of a search. Most people are never going to search deeper than 30 links before finding something close to what they are looking for. This means that Google considers two things - first, relevance to the term. A current news article will be put in alongside a geography site put in alongside a history and/or culture site. The current news article may have a thousand times the traffic of the history site for that day, but the two will be listed near each other for your search.

Every time you click a link listed by Google, their servers note the search you used, other links clicked on during that search, etc. Google is continually updating their listings of sites - every post on the ATS boards containing the word "egypt" will be returned in a search and counted as a search result. As message boards, Blogs, etc get old and shut down, remove pages from their servers, etc - links are going to become broken, out of date, and completely unnecessary to maintain in Google's database.

When you search Google - you are, effectively, searching Google's listings of sites - not the internet, itself. Google is merely a phone book of the internet, so to speak.



posted on May, 22 2011 @ 05:20 AM
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All search engines find results for your local area first.
Youtube filters comments on videos to show those from your country first.
Liveleak filters videos based on what is acceptable in your country. Around 2006 (just after it had changed fro ogrish to liveleak) I moved to the UK from Japan and found that the videos which were listed there while I was in Japan were nowhere to be seen when I got to the UK. I also noticed, and perhaps I am wrong, that Biritsh censorship of movies is very strict. Some movies are 4 - 7 minuets shorter due to scenes of violence or those of a sexual nature being removed. Or you could look at movies from my own country like "Uroutsukidouji" in which the UK have made a joke of it by editing nearly half the movie out. Private Ryan is 7 minuets shorter than the US version here in the UK. I heard that it's certificate was reduced to "15" in order to allow people of a school age to learn from it. To reduce it to a "15" they cut out large amounts of violence.
All this censorship in the UK leads me to believe that this is why filtering occurs here on a large scale. As for comments, perhaps they are filtered to keep people's opinions in line with the thoughts of your country.



posted on May, 22 2011 @ 11:55 PM
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If Google was only tailoring results to what they thought would be relevant to the person searching, wouldn't everyone still get the same number of results, just in a different order?

I think what the OP is having issues with is that he may not even have ACCESS to all of the information someone else is granted access to. Why is that? I agree that that's kind of weird. I knew searches were tailored... if you search for things, you'll usually get local results. I assumed I was being given access to everything else too, just maybe what someone in Glasgow would get would be farther down the list, as I'm in the U.S..



posted on May, 23 2011 @ 05:43 PM
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reply to post by jackieisinlove
 



I think what the OP is having issues with is that he may not even have ACCESS to all of the information someone else is granted access to.


Google doesn't grant you or deny you access to anything. They are a search engine. By their very nature, they cannot list every site and all content on the internet. There are limits to how fast they can update their databases to include new sites and/or domains, as well as how fast they can confirm removal/deletion of sites.

As has been shown - the results differ from hour to hour and day to day - not just by location. Their formulas are constantly being used to try and determine how relevant different links are to the search you entered - as well as other data.

You may also have safe-search turned on or off. You can also have language preferences (which may also vary by region).

There may also be certain domains and servers that block access from certain regions of the world, and search engines able to determine your location will simply not display those pages (if this is a known and persistent blockage) - as you'll never be granted access from that region.

You can try other search engines, too - Bing, Metacrawler, Yahoo - and I think Amazon still has their own search client (though it may be "powered by" some other search engine these days).



posted on May, 23 2011 @ 11:01 PM
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reply to post by Aim64C
 


I hadn't thought about this:




There may also be certain domains and servers that block access from certain regions of the world, and search engines able to determine your location will simply not display those pages (if this is a known and persistent blockage) - as you'll never be granted access from that region.


But it seems odd that there was a discrepancy in the amount of search results both people from the UK got on the first page of this thread. They also both did the search in the same time period, so this still doesn't seem like a perfect explanation to me.

In my mind, if there are 400 million search results, we should all get 400 million search results... provided that we have the same settings (safe search on or off) and do the search on, say, the same day or same hour. Maybe someone in the UK would get UK news as their first results and I'd get the US results first, but I'm not understanding why some people are getting hundreds or thousands less, I guess.

I'm not really that concerned about it. Worst case scenario: it's a conspiracy and we aren't all being given some information. Whatever, I'm used to that from the media
Just thought it was an interesting discussion. Thanks for sharing your thoughts.



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