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The World's Tallest Tree...

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posted on May, 18 2011 @ 07:58 PM
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reply to post by havok
 


The picture you are referring to is actually in Swquoia National Forest in Southern Cali. There are 2 areas where it occurs. In one section a sequoia (type of redwood tree) fell across a road, so they just created a tunnel through it.

In a second photo there is a tunnel going through a standing tree. The circumfrence was about 18feet.

These trees are just awesome.




posted on May, 18 2011 @ 08:06 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Slayer just had to add that per your doom and gloom thread I'd definetely like to be up in one of these bad boys when the mega-tsunami hits.



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 08:08 PM
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Originally posted by raiders247
Amazing, I wonder what causes these trees to be so tall.

How can this only happen in only one area of the world, what's so special about that region?


The secret is growing together in groups where they can protect each other.
Most of these Redwoods are in sheltered valleys where big winds are not as severe.

Truly awe-inspiring wonders of nature.
I'd bet there's hundreds of species undiscovered living in the canopy there.



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 08:34 PM
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Originally posted by raiders247
Amazing, I wonder what causes these trees to be so tall.

How can this only happen in only one area of the world, what's so special about that region?


Because the trees have evolved special ariel roots that allow them to absorb condensing water from the sea mists.



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 08:58 PM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69
reply to post by neo96
 


Yeah build a house out of petrified wood.
Should be pretty sturdy!

Petrified wood house



And another




posted on May, 18 2011 @ 09:17 PM
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reply to post by JohhnyBGood
 


That sounds funny but it's true.
My friend is bringing me over that months issue.



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 09:54 PM
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Hey, wait a minute... Aren't those a bunch of lumberjacks in that picture?



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 10:07 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


I've been there many times - The Redwoods, that is - Didn't see this tree, though. Amazing what Mama Nature can do when she's left alone.



As for the tree houses - didn't the Ewoks build an entire village there?




posted on May, 18 2011 @ 10:15 PM
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reply to post by LadySkadi
 


They have been standing for a long time.
It would be a shame if we lost them to our own stupidity and greed IMO.



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 10:27 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


J. Muir had it right...

Climb the mountains and get their good tidings. Nature's peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees. The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms their energy, while cares will drop away from you like the leaves of Autumn.



Even the Sierra Club [origins] had it right... back in the day.


Even in a changing environment, where quotas frequently must be used to limit recreational impacts, and in a Sierra Club with priorities that have come to include protecting clean air, soil, and water as well as wilderness, the original philosophy of outings continues. It has been clearly stated in On The Loose, a book written by young members Terry and Renny Russell, published by the Sierra Club in 1967:


"Not to escape from but to escape to: not to forget but to remember. We've been taking care of ourselves in places where it really matters. The next step is to take care of the places that really matter."



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 10:44 PM
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That picture is truly, truly awesome. I have never seen a picture of a redwood like that; usually to get full length, the tree is far away. And to have the people in/on the tree to gauge its size adds to its uniqueness. Thanks for sharing it here.

There are three families of Sequoioideae:

Metasequoia is found in China (not as big)

Sequoia sempervirens like the Hyperion are found in Northern Calif and Oregon and are the tallest

Sequoiadendron giganteum are the largest in size (diameter thus bulk) with the General Sherman Tree in Sequoia National Park (central Southern CA in the Sierra Nevada) as the largest tree (one limb on it can be the size of a regular tree)

What is fascinating to me is the size of their pine cone. For the size of the tree, the cone is terribly tiny, only about an inch and a half. And the bark on the mature Giant Sequoia feels soft and almost feathery to me. The roots spread out and are close to the surface of the ground, so visitors/loggers walking around the tree can actually inflict some damage.

Yes, the Star Wars Endor scenes were filmed among redwoods Northern CA also

I want to revisit this picture in a dream tonight.



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 10:49 PM
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I rember my parents takeing me to see the redwoods when i was a was very young and they still stand out in my mind ..I rember driveing through one of those trees and thinking how amazing it was even as a kid thanks for the thread S&F



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 11:09 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


And we have a Dawn Redwood in the corner of our front yard.




posted on May, 18 2011 @ 11:42 PM
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OMG that tree is growing ppl!

s+f for the planet



posted on May, 19 2011 @ 12:58 AM
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Originally posted by ashtonkusher
OMG that tree is growing ppl!

s+f for the planet


The people are so small in that pic they do kind of look like Christmas tree ornaments don't they?



posted on May, 19 2011 @ 01:06 AM
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reply to post by raiders247
 
It doesn't. Tasmania has giant trees too.

Report from 2008 so new redwood recordings beat this one but still very tall.
101 metres is 330 feet approx.
www.news.com.au...

THE world's second tallest tree has been found by Tasmanian foresters less than five kilometres from a popular tourist attraction.
Standing at about the same height as two of Hobart's Wrest Point Casino towers stacked on top of each other, the 101m giant swamp gum is second only to a giant coast redwood in the Redwood National Park in California that stands at 115m.

The Tasmanian tree has been aptly named Centurion which is a Roman officer in charge of 100 soldiers and is estimated to be about 400 years old.

Centurion will also go into the record books as the tallest hardwood tree in the world, the tallest eucalyptus in the world and the tallest flowering tree in the world.


Also saw documentry once where old records (1800's) of timber-getters claimed to have cut down a tree that measured inexcess of 400 feet. (sorry cannot positively confirm this though).



posted on May, 19 2011 @ 02:38 AM
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I counted 6 people in the pic....



posted on May, 19 2011 @ 02:59 AM
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I've been fascinated with Giant Redwoods since seeing a picture of a car driving through one when I was a bairn.

www.google.co.uk... =656

Definately on my list of things to do and see before I die.



posted on May, 19 2011 @ 04:17 AM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 




Mick, give him your wallet, he's got a tree...


Hehe, that's not a tree.


Now THAT is a tree.



Awesome thread, that's one mad tree..



posted on May, 19 2011 @ 06:30 AM
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Originally posted by exo87
I counted 6 people in the pic....
Same here, 4 in red shirts, one yellow shirt and one gray shirt. I never saw a 7th.


Originally posted by desert
Sequoiadendron giganteum are the largest in size (diameter thus bulk) with the General Sherman Tree in Sequoia National Park (central Southern CA in the Sierra Nevada) as the largest tree (one limb on it can be the size of a regular tree)
I've been to the General Sherman tree. They think its thousands of years old, can you imagine?

I never really thought about it but apparently these trees can even live through fires that kill other trees. It's hard to go 2000 years without a fire in CA.

It took a little while just to walk around the base of the tree.

There was a bear nearby too, tearing up a stump with its claws looking for something to eat in the stump. He tore that stump up faster with his claws than I could have with an axe. I've never been that close to a bear before, so I was a little nervous, but I figured I didn't have to outrun the bear, only the overweight tourist standing next to me



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