Secret Canyon Sedona, Az.?

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posted on May, 17 2011 @ 03:31 PM
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I'm currently in Sedona and have heard by mouth and read on net some interesting things about a top secret or underground base in Secret Cyn. but the info's been fairly vague. Can anyone shed some light on S.Cyn or Boynton Cyn which is next to it and has had many sightings of UFO's? I'm using library comp so excuse if my response may be slow.




posted on May, 17 2011 @ 03:53 PM
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Try this site
archive.alienzoo.com...


Let us know what you find, and any interesting experiences.
edit on 17-5-2011 by tinker9917 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 03:55 PM
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If you find anything while you are out there would love to see it, Sedona is a fascinating place.



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 04:04 PM
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posted on May, 17 2011 @ 06:13 PM
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Originally posted by mtnshredder
I'm currently in Sedona and have heard by mouth and read on net some interesting things about a top secret or underground base in Secret Cyn. but the info's been fairly vague. Can anyone shed some light on S.Cyn or Boynton Cyn which is next to it and has had many sightings of UFO's? I'm using library comp so excuse if my response may be slow.

Been to Sedona, no evidence exists to substantiate any of the claims about the underground base. Beautiful place though!



posted on May, 19 2011 @ 03:50 PM
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Just getting back into town, thanks for the replies and links. I was in Cottonwood last week and was talking to a guy that was very knowledgeable about aircraft, as we talked he brought up Secret Cyn. He said he knew someone that hiked back in there and was stopped by sound waves he couldn't handle and had to turn back. I know it's here-say but I did a little searching on the net and discovered a similar story, which doesn't make it true but I find it interesting none the less. I'll let you all know if I see anything as I plan on being here for awhile and doing some more hiking. It is very awesome here. Thank's all



posted on May, 19 2011 @ 08:32 PM
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Having lived in Sedona for several years and hiked it's many beautiful canyons and mesas, I have a few suggestions:

First, be prepared for all of the, ahem, 'extreme' viewpoints from all sides of the aisle regarding UFOs, New Age stuff, and the like. There is no question Sedona is a hotbed of activity in this regard, and, consequently draws throngs of visitors and residents alike eager to 'share their beliefs' with all passerby. It can get tiresome after awhile, especially when you are seeking some R&R or healthy scenery while hiking and are stopped for yet another lecture by strangers with a "story" to tell.

When hiking around the canyons, you will see all sorts of 'markers' that these believers have left behind, such as stone cairns, graffiti, and crude scrapes and symbols on stone faces -a sad reflection of humanity destroying the natural environment in an effort to 'convince' others that the magic 'is real'. While living there, I've had more than one encounter with tourists who were absolutely sure they 'discovered' evidence that an ancient civilization (e.g., the Anastazi) left a hidden message about aliens because they saw some marking on a stone that looked a lot like a "grey's head and body'.

Boynton Canyon is loaded with caves and unusual rock features, many that still have artifacts and old Native American relics in them (pottery shards and such). Please, please resist the temptation to disturb or remove them. It is not only against the law (the Antiquities Act is strongly enforced in Arizona) but also immensely inconsiderate to others who may come to experience the canyons after you not to mention the disrespect it shows toward the ancient cultures that once lived there.

Boynton Canyon dead-ends and really is more of a giant horse-shoe shaped cut into a part of the geologic formation know as the Mogollon Rim. The best way to experience it is to drive in past the Enchantment Resort (which was a HUGE controversy itself before finally getting approved to build), park your car and then hike the large loop trail. I saw many caves up in the cliffs that were unreachable without climbing gear, and the few I did reach were not "entrances" or anything very unusual (but they did have a mysterious 'feeling' to them - I know - sounds corny). Never heard any sounds or 'vibrations' myself, however.

They have several 4-wheel drive jeep tour operators in Sedona, and one of them, Pink Jeep Tours used to go into Boynton Canyon, though I'm not sure if they still do so (more controversy about that I remember). Anyway, if your not up to a strenuous hike, taking one of these jeep tours is an option. The added 'benefit' is that the jeep tour drivers usually know a lot about the history of the area, though I understand they have a tendency to "color" their narration a bit to gain a few laughs and gasps from their audience.

If you are hunting for visible UFO activity, there are two suggestions I can make:

One is that the best place to view potential activity over Boynton Canyon is NOT in the canyon itself, but rather from the road leading up to the Sedona Airport which sits on a mesa opposite and south of Boynton Canyon. Drive up the airport road along the face of the cliff at dusk, and pull over just before turning left to the airport property near the top of the mesa. Look to the north toward Sedona and Boynton Canyon and you'll see the most glorious view imaginable after sunset - and perhaps you'll be lucky enough to spot some lights in the sky with curious characteristics!

A second great vantage point is from Schnebly Hill road toe the east of town. As you drive up the road you'll see several turn-offs with exceptional views of Sedona and the skies above.

One final note: IMO, Boynton Canyon is over-rated and now highly commercialized as the 'story' has taken on a life of its own. Remember also, that though the area all around Sedona is breathtaking in its beauty, that it is mainly a tourist/resort destination, and the place is loaded with tourist shops, restaurants, and related activities, all of which have a very strong incentive to "keep the dreams alive" regarding UFOs, Vortex anomalies, and such. Everyone in town will tell you that Sedona is the center of the Universe regarding these things and that they have lots of kitsch and yarns to spin as you sip your cocktail and contemplate yet another t-shirt or keychain to 'remember your experience by.

That said, I have a few of my own favorite places in the Sedona area that don't cost anything and that I 'feel' are much closer to actually experiencing you may be after. The ones I am willing to share here include the canyon up the West Fork of Oak Creek on hwy 89A north of town, the hills and mesa above Page Springs west of town, around the town of Jerome and Mingus Mountain area further west (above Cottonwood), the old Anasazi ruins on the cliff face known as Montezuma Castle, among a few others.

My best kept secret and favorite place to get the "experience", shared only here for my ATS pals: Sycamore Canyon to the northwest of Sedona (north of Camp Verde). Sycamore Canyon is loaded with history and is a very rugged, almost impenetrable area that has made "the hair on my neck stand up" on several occasions. You can get to it from Hwy 89A through the small town of Clarkdale just west of Sedona, but the best access to the most magical recesses of the canyon can only be reached by driving through Flagstaff, west to Winslow, then south to White Horse ranch/campground. From there take the forest road as far south as you can to the upper edge of the cliffs above Sycamore Canyon. Then, if you are fit and able, climb down into the canyon for an experience you'll never forget... be sure you are well prepared and someone knows where you are going. Note that this is the place that supposedly some Spanish conquistadors got lost/attacked by Indians, and also a popular legend area for buried treasures, lost gold mines, and also where Geronimo tried to escape with his band of merry-makers -all in addition to having UFO reports, hidden bases and alien activity, among other things. Caution - when I was living in the area rumors persisted (and some actual reports) of hikers and treasure-seekers and such going in there and never being heard from again...

Best bet: just drive up to the top of the Airport road and take your camera and some refreshments and drive back down to your hotel after an hour or so of ...waiting.

Good luck and have fun!



posted on May, 21 2011 @ 05:43 PM
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reply to post by Outrageo
 

Thanks Outragio. I know what you mean about Sedona, having grown up in Phoenix we used to come here in the 70's and 80's and it's become very commercial. I'm camped in Oak Creek Cyn will take some of your suggestions and check them out. I didn't come here looking for UFO's but hey you never know.
Is there a base close to here? I've heard about a lot of military craft in the area and sure enough at dusk last night three Apache's and a Bell were flying fairly low and fast thru Oak Creek Cyn towards Flagstaff. Was very cool.



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 08:00 PM
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reply to post by adeclerk
 





Been to Sedona, no evidence exists to substantiate any of the claims about the underground base. Beautiful place though!


I've been to Sedona too, lots of times, I haven't found any evidence of underground bases either, but then again, I haven't scoured every square inch of the place either. I'm assuming your statement of no substantial evidence is based on a thorough and methodical search of every square inch of the place-I'm also assuming that this is based on going through your methodical search with a compass as it is reported that compasses go wonky around these entrances--being scientifically minded and all, that is what it would take to make an actual conclusive statement such as this. And what was the purpose of your visit to Sedona anyway? Was it to look for evidence of underground base entrances, because certainly, if there were entrances to underground bases in Sedona they most certainly wouldn't be easily found by casual Joe Tourist.

edit on 29-5-2011 by coyotepoet because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 09:37 PM
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reply to post by coyotepoet
 


Is it more likely that the compass anomaly is caused by the entrance to an underground base or because of deposits of magnetized iron in the rocks? Hint: The redness of the soil is caused by iron.



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 09:42 PM
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reply to post by adeclerk
 





Is it more likely that the compass anomaly is caused by the entrance to an underground base or because of deposits of magnetized iron in the rocks? Hint: The redness of the soil is caused by iron.


No s**t sherlock. Really? Educate me more please. I didn't know about red being caused by iron (really I did, I was being sarcastic. I also wasn't specifically speaking about Sedona in regards to compasses going wonky. That has been reported everywhere underground bases are supposed to be, regardless of whether or not the soil is red.) So what scientific survey method did you use to conclusively determine that there are no entrances in Sedona? You didn't mention that in your response post. Hint: you probably didn't mention it on purpose.

edit on 29-5-2011 by coyotepoet because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 09:50 PM
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Originally posted by coyotepoet
I also wasn't specifically speaking about Sedona in regards to compasses going wonky. That has been reported everywhere underground bases are supposed to be, regardless of whether or not the soil is red.)

Do you have a source for that bold claim?


Originally posted by coyotepoet
So what scientific survey method did you use to conclusively determine that there are no entrances in Sedona? You didn't mention that in your response post. Hint: you probably didn't mention it on purpose.

I used critical thinking, do you know what the burden of proof is? You see, I don't need to survey or do anything scientific to prove to you that something doesn't exist. A little critical thinking will tell you that if someone is making an outlandish claim (e.g. there is an underground base in sedona) they should have fantastic evidence to support that claim (there isn't any evidence of a base).

Therefore we can conclude there is no base. Why are you getting angry?



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 09:58 PM
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reply to post by adeclerk
 





I used critical thinking, do you know what the burden of proof is? You see, I don't need to survey or do anything scientific to prove to you that something doesn't exist. A little critical thinking will tell you that if someone is making an outlandish claim (e.g. there is an underground base in sedona) they should have fantastic evidence to support that claim (there isn't any evidence of a base). Therefore we can conclude there is no base. Why are you getting angry?


Cannot find the source regarding compass anomalies but I remember reading it a few years back. I do know what the burden of proof is and yet, you cannot conclusively say that there is not an entrance to an underground base without proof anymore than I can conclusively say that there are. Not getting angry, what makes you think that? Sarcastic doesn't mean angry any more than dismissive means paid troll. Critical thinking? Hardly. Just a convenient way of not having to back up any of your claims that there isn't an entrance.

edit on 29-5-2011 by coyotepoet because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 10:04 PM
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Originally posted by coyotepoet
Cannot find the source regarding compass anomalies but I remember reading it a few years back.

Don't believe everything you read, unless what is stated is independently verifiable.


Originally posted by coyotepoet
I do know what the burden of proof is and yet, you cannot conclusively say that there is not an entrance to an underground base without proof anymore than I can conclusively say that there are.


You say you know it, but you demonstrate a lack of understanding. I can conclusively say there isn't a base because the evidence supports that there isn't. There is no evidence to support your outlandish claim (upon which the burden of proof lies), no photos of entrances, no schematics, no ground penetrating radar readouts. Nothing. There should be some evidence, if it exists.


Originally posted by coyotepoet
Not getting angry, what makes you think that?

The part where you responded angrily, as if you were insulted by my explanation.


Originally posted by coyotepoet
Critical thinking? Hardly. Just a convenient way of not having to back up any of your claims that there isn't an entrance.


Wrong. The evidence supports that there is no entrance or base, see above.

Unless it's an invisible entrance?



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 10:11 PM
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reply to post by adeclerk
 





You say you know it, but you demonstrate a lack of understanding. I can conclusively say there isn't a base because the evidence supports that there isn't. There is no evidence to support your outlandish claim (upon which the burden of proof lies), no photos of entrances, no schematics, no ground penetrating radar readouts. Nothing. There should be some evidence, if it exists.


Admittedly, this is a bit of a deus ex machina response. I don't think there is necessarily an underground base IN Sedona, but possible an entrance, but here's the thing. If there are DUMBS, they have been made under above top secret circumstances by people who would sooner kill a person than blink for releasing or possessing information. I understand your point, but I always find it funny that people demand proof for such things that are kept super secret. Of course there is not proof for the common man-that is the point of super secret.



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 10:16 PM
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reply to post by coyotepoet
 


So you hereby make the DUMBS claim unfalsifiable, which (if you are a critical thinker) immediately flags an argument as bogus.

Case closed.



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 10:23 PM
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reply to post by adeclerk
 





So you hereby make the DUMBS claim unfalsifiable, which (if you are a critical thinker) immediately flags an argument as bogus. Case closed.


Hardly, what about the reports about Denver Intl, or things like the patents for the super driller? But you are going to keep arguing like the good sock puppet you are so yes, case closed-for you at any rate.



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 10:26 PM
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reply to post by coyotepoet
 

The reports of Denver airport are as unsubstantiated as FEMA camps. I suppose you believe in those too? (they have been debunked)



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 10:37 PM
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reply to post by adeclerk
 


I once had a teacher speak a great truth and I have carried it for many years:

"The Truth does not require you to believe in it to exist."

To say that something has been debunked, end of story, does not necessarily make it so.

J Allen Hynek was a debunker that was paid to debunk things that actually existed. I'm sure there are many debunkers like that.

Show me the material about DIA being debunked and that the person/people that did so did not have a hidden agenda and I might believe it.

I don't fully believe that many things in the conspiracy world exist, nor do I fully believe they don't.



posted on Jun, 3 2011 @ 01:35 PM
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reply to post by Outrageo
 


Excellent and informed response Outrageo... I too am a Sedona, AZ resident for 9 years, and after hiking most of the canyons and trails that are rich with local urban legends, I can you 99% of them are exactly that - false urban legends. I have never been stopped by sterile para-military guards with sub-machine guns, I've never stumbled upon entrances to secret bases, nor have I experienced anything really out of the ordinary aside from the breath-taking landscape that makes Sedona so popular.

I have, however, personally witnessed black helicopters flying in formation towards the Long Canyon/Boynton Canyon area and other peculiar military activity - although no vehicles with CIA or other spook markings on them. The last time I saw these helicopters, or the military, was years ago.

I have also seen military helicopters with tan camo paint flying around - **BUT** - please note these *TAN* helicopters are simply from the local Luke Airforce base down in Phoenix, and they cruise up to Sedona to see the rock formations on their lunch breaks, or when a high profile visitor visits and wants to see the sights. Nothing strange or paranormal about that. Also John McCain's ranch is just a few miles out of town - but the Secret Service is hard to confuse with exotic military craft or typical military behavior. I grew up in a military family - so usually I can tell the difference. Although what's normal about the military? lol...

Sedona is a hot spot for UFO activity - that much is for sure. After having gone out on UFO hunts in the past, I've personally found success driving down Hwy 89A south towards cottonwood, then turning onto Bill Grey Road and driving north towards the canyons. The large meadowy area just south of Sedona will give you a different perspective on the town and the Canyons, aside from the GREAT spots Outrageo already recommended.





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