Planet outside solar system is habitable

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posted on May, 17 2011 @ 08:56 AM
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Originally posted by CobraCommander
they dont even know what it really going on in our local moons, hogwash.


I think it's something to do with spectral analysis, we can look at the star that the planet orbits, analyse that light and then look at the light that passes through the atmosphere of the planet.... We can't do that with the moons in our own solar system (well most of them any way) because we are always looking away from the sun,

That's my initial thought any way, I could be wrong.




posted on May, 17 2011 @ 09:12 AM
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Originally posted by Now_Then

Originally posted by CobraCommander
they dont even know what it really going on in our local moons, hogwash.


I think it's something to do with spectral analysis, we can look at the star that the planet orbits, analyse that light and then look at the light that passes through the atmosphere of the planet.... We can't do that with the moons in our own solar system (well most of them any way) because we are always looking away from the sun,

That's my initial thought any way, I could be wrong.





I'm just gonna add to your statements and i do agree with your reply to the claim this is ''hogwash''


Why ''hogwash''





Without rambling on i will just post a larger snippet from the original Science Daily article which goes into far greater detail on how the scientists reached this conclusion and how much work has actually gone into studying this planet and system. I also noticed the majority of news outlets got their quotes and stories from this original report;












In this quest, the red dwarf star Gliese 581 has already received a huge amount of attention. In 2007, scientists reported the detection of two planets orbiting not far from the inner and outer edge of its habitable zone. While the more distant planet, Gliese 581d, was initially judged to be too cold for life, the closer-in planet was thought to be potentially habitable by its discoverers. However.............

Full Article - ScienceDaily (May 16, 2011)

 




Today, it is finally Gliese 581g's big brother -- the larger and more distant Gliese 581d -- which has been shown to be the confirmed potentially habitable exoplanet by Robin Wordsworth, François Forget and co-workers from Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (CNRS, UPMC, ENS Paris, Ecole Polytechnique) at the Institute Pierre Simon Laplace in Paris. Although it is likely to be a rocky planet, it has a mass at least seven times that of Earth, and is estimated to be about twice its size. At first glance, Gliese 581d is a pretty poor candidate in the hunt for life: it receives less than a third of the stellar energy Earth does and may be tidally locked, with a permanent day and night side. After its discovery, it was generally believed that any atmosphere thick enough to keep the planet warm would become cold enough on the night side to freeze out entirely, ruining any prospects for a habitable climate.





To test whether this intuition was correct, Wordsworth and colleagues developed a new kind of computer model capable of accurately simulating possible exoplanet climates. The model simulates a planet's atmosphere and surface in three dimensions, rather like those used to study climate change on Earth. However, it is based on more fundamental physical principles, allowing the simulation of a much wider range of conditions than would otherwise be possible, including any atmospheric cocktail of gases, clouds and aerosols.

To their surprise, they found that with a dense carbon dioxide atmosphere -- a likely scenario on such a large planet -- the climate of Gliese 581d is not only stable against collapse, but warm enough to have oceans, clouds and rainfall. One of the key factors in their results was Rayleigh scattering, the phenomenon that makes the sky blue on Earth. In the Solar System, Rayleigh scattering limits the amount of sunlight a thick atmosphere can absorb, because a large portion of the scattered blue light is immediately reflected back to space. However, as the starlight from Gliese 581 is red, it is almost unaffected. This means that it can penetrate much deeper into the atmosphere, where it heats the planet effectively due to the greenhouse effect of the CO2 atmosphere, combined with that of the carbon dioxide ice clouds predicted to form at high altitudes. Furthermore, the 3D circulation simulations showed that the daylight heating was efficiently redistributed across the planet by the atmosphere, preventing atmospheric collapse on the night side or at the poles.








edit on 17-5-2011 by Havick007 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 09:39 AM
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reply to post by Havick007
 


I declare myself the official Carbon Czar of Gliese 581d. Any future enterprises wishing to colonize Gliese 581d, will have to pay carbon credits to my office.

I thought I would get in on the action before Al does.



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 09:54 AM
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Originally posted by network dude
reply to post by Havick007
 


I declare myself the official Carbon Czar of Gliese 581d. Any future enterprises wishing to colonize Gliese 581d, will have to pay carbon credits to my office.

I thought I would get in on the action before Al does.


I heard this guy already had first dibs on the system.





posted on May, 17 2011 @ 10:17 AM
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reply to post by Havick007
 


This is amazing, although not surprising. It was bound to happen eventually. Now all we need to do is develop warp drive and we can send all of the Liberals there.



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 10:26 AM
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When they say planet is inhabitable than mean for life as we know it yes,aliens could be completely dif to us what we can't handle they prob can and viser verser.Maybe this is why we see so many ufos in the air and not out and about maybe they can't survive on our planet.We have some strange creatures on earth which survive in extreme conditions so when these people find new planets but are very hot or very cold they dismiss there could be life on it and continue searching,there is no limits to what kind of environment other forms of life could live in.



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 10:51 AM
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reply to post by MikeboydUS
 


damn. is that ALgore's cousin?

they have the same chins.

Oh well, maybe next planet.
edit on 17-5-2011 by network dude because: added thought



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 11:16 AM
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Finaly they found one. With all secrete technologies US and other countries have, it sould be easy to go on this planet.



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 11:36 AM
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This is excellent news, I just hope they actually just cover it out in the media. The planet looks like its more than 100x the size of the earth, it will probably take a 90 hour trip to get from side to another lmao. There has to be life on other planets, we are definitely not alone. I mean, the earth is only one planet amongst billions of planets out there and this planet is only 20 light years away!



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 11:37 AM
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I hate to rain on the parade (you know I do) but no one knows if the planet is habitable or even if it has an atmosphere at all.

A computer model was used which tried different scenarios. That computer program indicates that if the planet has a dense CO2 atmosphere it may support liquid water.

If there is no atmosphere or too thin an atmosphere, no water.
If there is an atmosphere without enough CO2, no water.

We do not know what sort of atmosphere the planet has. That's it.



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 12:24 PM
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Use astral roads to visit that planet and you will notice that there is nothing spectacular there



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 12:26 PM
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delete, please
edit on 17-5-2011 by DarylHamblett because: double post



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 12:40 PM
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Originally posted by Jax27
Imagine if the US forgot about trillion dollar wars and put up a trillion dollar space telescope at a moon base instead. Humans, so much potential but never lift a finger to it.


Or imagine something really outlandish where we take that trillion dollars and ensure all humans have access to clean water, health care, food, shelter, and education.



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 12:50 PM
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reply to post by Havick007
 
I think this is good news.
Where can I sign up.
I am packed up and ready.



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 01:13 PM
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Originally posted by Isildur1
Space exploration moderately intrigues me, however to an extent it is taken too far. 20 thousands light years away would take how many centuries to get to? More than any human could live by far obviously. This planet discovered will never be inhabited by humans from Earth. Funding for space should be directed for monitoring closer to home for asteroid detection, observation etc.
In my opinion it is a waste of time and money to discover planets that "may be inhabitable" trillions and trillions of miles away. Our only benefit is to think "oh that's cool, an interesting discovery!" But other than that, what else is to be done about it. Anyone going to volunteer to go and colonize it? Lol, It's impossible.

Upon re-reading the article, it's actually a misleading title. They claim it would not be possible for humans to breathe properly on it. Move along scientists, you are wasting your time with this one.


Yaaa Isildur1 whats up brah.



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 01:16 PM
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I rather stay here and recycle this one...

Always have plan B; -building a spacebug in the garage!



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 01:56 PM
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Unless we find a way to travel faster than the speed of light, it doesnt matter if we can inhabit the planet or not.



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 02:07 PM
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Originally posted by Slipdoggety
I never thought of the gravity and its being doubled, even though I read it. I think you are right they could not possibly be from a planet with double gravity. Although if they are that would explain their apparent or reported ability to jump aound and move with ease on Earth. Maybe the gravity here is like us being on the moon to them.


Speaking of gravity, from what I know things tend to grow bigger in higher gravity.

I'd imagine we have some giant crazy looking creatures in the far depths of the oceans, stuff like Kthulu lol
Planets with giant or microscopic life is not impossible



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 02:19 PM
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reply to post by Havick007
 


According to the science daily article the exo-planet could only support life similar to earth:

"Gliese 581d, can be considered the first confirmed exoplanet that could support Earth-like life"

Which I guess is to be expected depending on the habitable zone distance, composition and mass of the planet, weather system and asmosphere etc.

If the diagram mentioned above shows hot and cold regions I guess that means any future colonisation would be in the northern hemoshere.

Ah talk of colonisation reminds me of the empire (I'm British lol).



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 02:58 PM
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Originally posted by InfaRedMan

Originally posted by bigyin
Who pays these guys to come up with this nonsence ?

I'd love a job like that.


Nonsense based upon what exactly? Paranoia? An aversion to science? I get the feeling that people such as yourself will never be happy with anything, and look for the negative in everything. Unless it's Buck Rogers, you're not buying right!

IRM


You couldn't be more wrong m8. I'm an engineer myself and love science and technology, but what I get annoyed about is people like these spending decades in jobs and coming up with nonsence theories that can neither be proved or disproved. It's just all made up to justify their own existence. It doesn't even matter what the planet might or might not look like it's not like anyone is ever going to find out so what exactly is the point of it all. Surely the money and resources these sychophants use up could be better used to find answers to problems closer to home.
edit on 17-5-2011 by bigyin because: (no reason given)






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