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When will we truly explore the stars?

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posted on May, 16 2011 @ 06:10 PM
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I am a complete amateur when it comes to space travel, exploration, technology, physics etc - but I am slowly learning!

As I understand it, one of the closest planets (Gilese 518d), is 20 light years away - which is 300,000 years based on our current space travel technology.

From what I've read, we are nowhere near developing technology to achieve travel at anywhere near light speed.

Will we achieve a breakthrough in our generation? Or should I stop looking at the stars?




posted on May, 16 2011 @ 06:12 PM
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Get into a blue box and then call me, only way you'll see the stars is if you go with a crazy man. Disclosure just ain't coming, I wish it was but it ain't..Don't stop looking at the stars I look up too, hoping I'll see something but it never comes. Maybe a UFO and that's it, nothing I ever want to see. Plain and simple, it's driven me along with a sprinkle of conspiracy manically insane. When you go crazy you understand the universe better, and I have. Things are easier to understand now.
edit on 16-5-2011 by Heartisblack because: (no reason given)

edit on 16-5-2011 by Heartisblack because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 06:16 PM
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Dunno. I believe we already have technology capable of science-fictionesque space travel, they just aren't revealing it to us.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 06:21 PM
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reply to post by ExCommando
 


I think if we ever hope to explore space, wormholes (if they even exist) would need to be discovered and used. Gilese 518d is 20 light years away, which after hearing of planets and solar systems thousands of light year away, suddenly doesn't seem that far.

Even if we COULD travel at the speed of light, which is 11,160,000 MPH, it would take 40 years round trip, not to mention be virtually impossible to do so in a safe manner. Traveling that fast, colliding with something even the size of a peanut would be disastrous.
edit on 5/16/2011 by Adyta because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 06:22 PM
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Space travel is something that fascinates me. The idea of visiting and exploring new worlds is one of my dreams. I'd say space travel is something we will never be able to see as long as the grand deception by the elite continues to reign supreme over humanity. I can tell you with absolute certainty, the moment mankind breaks free from their shackles we will enter a golden age of space exploration. That I can tell you with absolute certainty. We humans can achieve anything we propose ourselves.

Never lose your illusion for the stars.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 06:22 PM
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Well to explore the stars, one would first have to get past Uranus.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 06:23 PM
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You know what would be hilarious though? Imagine this.

We find a breakthrough in space travel, we figure out how to reach other worlds with manned missions. The technology has been proven, but the means to pull it of will take a few decades of construction. Years later, a whole generation of peoples whole lives where lived knowing soon, we will take off to the stars, and reach new worlds.

On the eve of our first departure, after years and years of anticipation and labor..... Aliens of an advanced civilization show up.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 06:23 PM
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reply to post by Adyta
 


I've just read another interesting fact - it takes light 100,000 years to travel the length of the milky way.

I never truly understand the vastness of space, and it's just starting to sink in.

And with this understanding comes a level of sadness. There must be something out there in the depths of space, but chances are we will never get the chance to explore.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 06:24 PM
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reply to post by zookey
 


Hahahhaha nice!!!



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 06:25 PM
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reply to post by ExCommando
 


You might be happily pleased to know that if you can approach light speed travel, you won't be traveling as long as you might think. But if you do approach the speed of light then going back home you would be in for a huge shock, time there could be thousands of years in the future from when you left depending on how close to light speed you traveled. You can only go forward in time, not backwards.

This little video can give you a snapshot of the theory I reside with.




posted on May, 16 2011 @ 06:35 PM
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reply to post by ExCommando
 


If that fact impressed you, watch this video... Every time I see the Hubble deep field photos, I get goosebumps. It's not a question of IS there any other life out there, but WHERE are they? For now, we have to hope they have the technology to find us.




posted on May, 16 2011 @ 06:40 PM
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reply to post by ExCommando
 


No we will most definitely not be travelling long distances within our lifetimes.... we haven't even landed a man on Mars yet. It is a sad thought, but that isn't a reason for you to stop and look at the stars. They are one of the most fascinating and beautiful things you can look at and probably the most interesting.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 06:44 PM
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reply to post by Adyta
 


Also consider the vast predetermined calculations necessary to motion sync the very long exposure to focus the image since everything is moving. SO where is it that NASA lies since the ESA is a complete partner in Hubble time and data? Is everybody lying then? Wouldn't one of the millions of astronomers and amateur astronomers blow the whistle on data that's clearly woo?



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 06:56 PM
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Humans have not even completely explored the Earth.

You only dream of traveling between the stars because science
fiction tells you that there are all these wondrous aliens and stuff
awaiting discovery.

It might not be so glamorous, might be just boring mudball after
boring mudball.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 06:59 PM
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We cannot travel to other worlds until we have the ability to shield ourselves from massive amounts of radiation present in unprotected space. Once we've done that, and we've created a way to maintain food sources and oxygen, we can leave. Unfortunately, I don't think humans are peaceful enough to achieve this goal.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 07:09 PM
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The amount of power we can control is pitifully tiny compared with the amounts that would be required to move the vast distances between star systems.

What would be required is something that breaks the rules of established theory.

NASA (true trekkies all) established a program of Breakthrough Propulsion Physics research to try and overcome current limitations.

Unfortunately, it was discontinued in 2008.

Sadly, our hope for a future of space exploration appears to have faltered due to apathy and bookkeepers with no vision.

We're stuck here 'till we die of some minor space bourne hazard.
edit on 16/5/2011 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 07:15 PM
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Weightlessness is another problems currently in the working. Everything from compression suites to inertia spheres have been brought up as solutions but I don't think those will make it far. I remember reading somewhere that propelling the space craft to produce 1g (Earths Gravity) would not only eliminate this problem but reach are destinations at unprecedented times. Even getting to Mars would exponentially quicker while traveling at those speeds. I will look for the source info and post back..

EDIT: Here's a tidbit but its Yahoo Answers (so source considered) but it offers a good explanation.. now to find the wiki article...

Yahoo Anwers - What is the equivelent of 1G in miles per hour?
edit on 16-5-2011 by Fester1882 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 07:26 PM
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Originally posted by Fester1882
Weightlessness is another problems currently in the working. Everything from compression suites to inertia spheres have been brought up as solutions but I don't think those will make it far. I remember reading somewhere that propelling the space craft to produce 1g (Earths Gravity) would not only eliminate this problem but reach are destinations at unprecedented times. Even getting to Mars would exponentially quicker while traveling at those speeds. I will look for the source info and post back..

EDIT: Here's a tidbit but its Yahoo Answers (so source considered) but it offers a good explanation.. now to find the wiki article...

Yahoo Anwers - What is the equivelent of 1G in miles per hour?
edit on 16-5-2011 by Fester1882 because: (no reason given)


40 hours to reach mars?

How does this work (laymans terms would be AWESOME)



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 07:31 PM
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In space there is minimal amount of friction. And since 1g is acceleration not speed your speed would be constantly increasing. Now that guys mathematics assumes your shooting in a straight line. (Which is not the case) and that you would not encounter any space debris (also very unlikely) but assuming both of those were true, you would be flying at a ever increasing speed until you reached the destination. The biggest problem with this is finding a propulsion system capable of sustaining 1g acceleration. (Rocket fuel would be impossible because it would run out too fast) Too my knowledge nuclear fusion (or fission??) might be capable of doing this but seeing it in our lifetime is most likely not going to happen because you would need a international community of scientist working together to find solutions to interplanetary travel. (Something that cannot occur under capitalism)



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 07:32 PM
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reply to post by Fester1882
 





Interplanetary Travel Mankind is close to employing constant acceleration technologies to journeys around the solar system. One example of this is the VASIMR propulsion system currently being developed by NASA and former astronaut Franklin Chang-Diaz. The current implementations have high fuel efficiencies but feeble thrust. But when drives can deliver constant accelerations in the .1G to .5G range, journeys between planets will take days not years.


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