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Toxic heavy metals found in makeup.

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posted on May, 16 2011 @ 12:03 PM
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Originally posted by GoneGrey
reply to post by TrueBrit
 

I'd love to know what compels someone to trade their health and well-being for the sake of vanity.


Obviously, it's an insecurity issue, and lack of self-respect. What that stems from? there could be a thousand reasons for that. Our society is built off of consumerism, which is narcissism applied to materials. Some where along the lines people bought into a whole lot of marketing jargon, and mistook real values for ones that just aren't too valuable from the perspective of doing that which is healthy...sanity.




posted on May, 16 2011 @ 12:20 PM
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reply to post by GoneGrey
 


This is my problem with what I call the vanity market. You get hair dye , which , no matter how pretty it may look to some, and no matter how careful the chemists are to avoid damage to the hair, they cannot escape the fact that any un natural tinting of the hair causes damage to it, which only gets worse the more you use. Hence these companies that make the hair product end up getting so much return custom! They ruin your hair, which means you have to use products to attempt to straighten it out, or improve its appearance.

My attitude to life is very simple. I will never buy Just For Men hair dye, because I wear my grey hairs (been going that way since I was sixteen and a bit) like a tree wears its rings, in accordance with the natural order. I do not insist that my hair, or my body be waxed off, trimmed obsessively, treated with massive doses of chemicals, or any other bloody thing. In my opinion its not a man thing, not to be overly fussed about looking perfect, its a truth thing. Truth is that perfection is un natural, and attempting to attain it is an affront to nature, or to God if you prefer!

We should instead be who we are and be happy with it.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 12:23 PM
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reply to post by unityemissions
 





Obviously, it's an insecurity issue, and lack of self-respect....


Not only is there pressure from the MSM, there is pressure from your family - "Are you going out without even putting lipstick on?!?"
And pressure from your peers - other women NOT the men.

I never really wore make-up and the interesting thing is you got mocked by the girls and the guys would tell you, "Thank goodness you do not wear make-up! "

If I worked at it I could be very attractive, so much so that people did not even recognize me when I put on "War Paint" But the question to ask yourself is do you really want a guy who only is attracted to the outside?

My answer was NO! So the war paint was saved for Job Interviews, Proms and "high Social Events" - ALL battles in my opinion



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 12:28 PM
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reply to post by crimvelvet
 


Whoa you're a woman?!



You just became super attractive.






posted on May, 16 2011 @ 12:44 PM
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Whether you approve of the "vanity" industry or not, it is with us and it ain't going away!

All we can do is try and be as natural and safe as possible, and avoid the need for bunnies to get any more mascara shoved in their eyes.

I make my living from people wanting to look a certaian way, and it is a complex and emotive subject. There will always be people who wish to be as nature intended, and who would never set foot in one of my salons.

The majority of people like a neat haircut, or nice styling, nice nails etc etc. All I do is fulfill that demand in the safest, least damaging way.

After many years of standing behind a chair, my feet are as flat as flippers, so I am no fan of heels either!



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 02:55 PM
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Originally posted by persianista

The majority of people like a neat haircut, or nice styling, nice nails etc etc. All I do is fulfill that demand in the safest, least damaging way.



How do you reconcile the benefits of your livelihood with your workplace exposures to the chemicals of hairsprays and other beauty enhancing substances that you have to work with?

When I go for my customary simple haircut (I eschew any treatment such as perms, tints, dyes, etc. for fear of the chemicals) I feel so sorry for the hairdressers when I see them enveloped in a cloud of chemical mist while working on other patrons. They are inhaling or otherwise coming into contact with this all day long, day after day. Do you take any measures to protect yourself or do you otherwise worry about the long term effects on your own health?



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 03:19 PM
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Originally posted by GoneGrey

Originally posted by persianista

The majority of people like a neat haircut, or nice styling, nice nails etc etc. All I do is fulfill that demand in the safest, least damaging way.



How do you reconcile the benefits of your livelihood with your workplace exposures to the chemicals of hairsprays and other beauty enhancing substances that you have to work with?

When I go for my customary simple haircut (I eschew any treatment such as perms, tints, dyes, etc. for fear of the chemicals) I feel so sorry for the hairdressers when I see them enveloped in a cloud of chemical mist while working on other patrons. They are inhaling or otherwise coming into contact with this all day long, day after day. Do you take any measures to protect yourself or do you otherwise worry about the long term effects on your own health?

Hairdressers get no more serious illness than anyone else statistically. There is no increased risk of premature death, cancer or industrial disease amongst salon workers.
There is an increased risk of varicose veins and repetitive strain injury though.

You don't normally breathe in when you spray the hairspray, you tend to hold your breath!


We don't really have skin contact with chemicals as we wear gloves. We ventilate the salon well too.

Personally I wouldn't want to work in a salon which does acrylic nails (we don't) as I find the smell and dust unbearable. I have been told it's not a health hazard, but I get a shocking headache when exposed to the smell.

Have been a salon hairdresser for 25 years now, and have never been ill. 3 days off sick in a 25 year career is pretty good. I have my own salon chain now, and pay serious attention to a good, safe working environment, which probably helps.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 04:06 PM
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reply to post by crimvelvet
 


Ahhh! (I have no idea why I have suddenly taken to starting every post with this lol )

No I wasn't aware of the milk thing.

I'm amazed that we don't have the ingredients listing on all cosmetics, as we have it on virtually everything else.

On product I came across a while ago, which I don't use, but I find disturbing, is a moisturiser made by a famous high end cosmetic house, that contains an enzyme called "sirtuin". Basically what it does is instead of a damaged cell dying, it "repairs " (yeah right ) the dammaged cell, so that it lives longer apparently.

Personally I don't think this can be very healthy, as the cell dying process is pretty much an essential process for the body, I can imagine all kind of problems arising from stopping cells taking one for the team so to speak.


edit on 16-5-2011 by solargeddon because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 08:26 PM
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reply to post by persianista
 


Thank you very much...and i realy mean it



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 11:27 PM
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reply to post by crimvelvet
 


Dear god man! Or should I say.. Woman!

There goes the old myth that Men know more...

Dammit all to hell.




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