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Is Alpha Centauri inhabited?

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posted on May, 15 2011 @ 10:44 PM
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I was reading about the system on Wikipedia, apparently, like Z. Reticuli, it is a binary system composed of 2 Sun-like yellow stars. The metal content is similar to our sun, and though there is no evidence of brown dwarfs or gas giants there, it's speculated there could be planets there.

Have you ever heard of any cases of ETs from the Alpha Centauri system?




posted on May, 15 2011 @ 10:55 PM
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I believe Billy Meier or someone else like him, who had contact with aliens, said they were from Alpha Centauri.... I may be wrong about the person though.
edit on 15-5-2011 by JoeDaShom because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 11:00 PM
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reply to post by descartes90
 


I believe Metamorpho is indeed from Alpha Centauri.



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 11:01 PM
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Originally posted by descartes90
I was reading about the system on Wikipedia, apparently, like Z. Reticuli, it is a binary system composed of 2 Sun-like yellow stars. The metal content is similar to our sun, and though there is no evidence of brown dwarfs or gas giants there, it's speculated there could be planets there.

Have you ever heard of any cases of ETs from the Alpha Centauri system?


There is no reliable evidence to support that there is any intelligent life in the Alpha Centauri system.



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 11:14 PM
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reply to post by descartes90
 


alpha centuri is a star - so no , there is negligable chance it is inhabited

is alpha centruri orbited by an inhabitted planet ? - unknown - we have yet to even see evidence of planets - let alone life in that system



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 11:41 PM
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It would be great to discover a planet in Alpha Centauri.

Alpha Centauri May Have Habitable Planets, if Only We Can Get There

From 2009:




The Centauri system is nearly 26 trillion miles away.

That's roughly 280,000 times the distance of the Earth from the sun. It's so distant that a beam of light traveling at 186,000 miles per second needs more than four years to cross the interstellar void. If you looked at Alpha Centauri tonight (it's overhead in the Southern Hemisphere), you'd be seeing light emitted right around the time of the second inauguration of George W. Bush.

To frame it another way: The venerable robotic probe Voyager I, which has traveled farther from Earth than any man-made spacecraft, is racing away at nearly 11 miles per second and has already traveled 10 billion miles. It would need on the order of 80,000 years to reach Alpha Centauri were it traveling in that direction.



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 11:48 PM
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There are hundreds of millions of earth like planets in our galaxy alone. So yes, the alpha centauri system is likely inhabited.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 02:14 AM
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Seriously, they're on about Aliens from all over. Was checking out some astronomy the other night on the net and reading about the Arcturians, found the star and had a look, and even though the stories are probably crap it makes you think. (If you guys know the big dipper and don't know arcturius, look at the bright star to the left of it.)

Apparently in Exopolitics the Arcturians are the most advanced beings around, the ones protecting us. I'll believe it if I ever see them, until then, no thanks.

If you're into that stuff though you should check out pleiades, orion, sirius, lyra, and andromeda too. Do some researching, just don't blindly believe all that stuff, it might not be worth it. Especially if they're around and from a dimension next door to us.
edit on 16-5-2011 by robhines because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 02:50 AM
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Originally posted by Tephra
There are hundreds of millions of earth like planets in our galaxy alone. So yes, the alpha centauri system is likely inhabited.


You didn't eat your Wheaties this morning, did you. I mean... there may be that many Earth-like planets in our galaxy (no actual verification of that), but even if there are, there is zero evidence that there are any planets at all orbiting Alpha Centauri, much less whether they are inhabitable, much less whether they are actually inhabited.

Your statement is like saying "there are millions of loaves of bread in the world, so there is most likely mold growing in my cupboard" before you even checked to see if there's any bread in there.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 04:06 AM
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Originally posted by vexati0n
Your statement is like saying "there are millions of loaves of bread in the world, so there is most likely mold growing in my cupboard" before you even checked to see if there's any bread in there.


But if they have bread, there's still a chance isn't there? Try your best, really. We can't prove it, you can't discount it. Save yourself the hassle. Supposed bread in one cupboard isn't the same is it? Because out there there's maybe a whole lot of cupboards that could contain a whole load of bread, and a load of mold, not just the one persons. And maybe some mold knows how to look for other mold, maybe because it's been around for many thousands of years longer than the other molds around. Seriously.

If I ever see a UFO land, I'm hoping for mold to step out, just to spite you.
edit on 16-5-2011 by robhines because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 09:02 AM
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Originally posted by robhines

Originally posted by vexati0n
Your statement is like saying "there are millions of loaves of bread in the world, so there is most likely mold growing in my cupboard" before you even checked to see if there's any bread in there.


But if they have bread, there's still a chance isn't there? Try your best, really. We can't prove it, you can't discount it. Save yourself the hassle. Supposed bread in one cupboard isn't the same is it? Because out there there's maybe a whole lot of cupboards that could contain a whole load of bread, and a load of mold, not just the one persons. And maybe some mold knows how to look for other mold, maybe because it's been around for many thousands of years longer than the other molds around. Seriously.

If I ever see a UFO land, I'm hoping for mold to step out, just to spite you.
edit on 16-5-2011 by robhines because: (no reason given)


Yeah... I wasn't saying it's impossible, I'm saying people shouldn't use the phrase "most likely" when the phrase that fits the facts (or our knowledge of them) is "there's a chance."



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 09:04 AM
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I really doubt the "star" is inhabited, it would be too hot to live on the surface wouldnt it?



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 09:12 AM
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Originally posted by vexati0n

Originally posted by Tephra
There are hundreds of millions of earth like planets in our galaxy alone. So yes, the alpha centauri system is likely inhabited.


You didn't eat your Wheaties this morning, did you. I mean... there may be that many Earth-like planets in our galaxy (no actual verification of that), but even if there are, there is zero evidence that there are any planets at all orbiting Alpha Centauri, much less whether they are inhabitable, much less whether they are actually inhabited.

Your statement is like saying "there are millions of loaves of bread in the world, so there is most likely mold growing in my cupboard" before you even checked to see if there's any bread in there.


For the millionth time, why do 'habitable' planets have to be "Earth-Like"?

I get sick of hearing how many humans feel that we are the sh$$ of the universe, that aliens have to 'prove' themselves to us, and that their planet has to be like ours to be habitable....

just because we can't live very close to a star (Venus, Mervcury) doesn't mean that no other civilization can

just because we can't live too far from a star (Neptune, Pluto) doesn't mean that no other civilization can

I always say and I'll say it again, 'We are NOT the center of the universe, physically or figuratively"



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 09:19 AM
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Originally posted by Tephra
There are hundreds of millions of earth like planets in our galaxy alone. So yes, the alpha centauri system is likely inhabited.

I don't quite follow your logic.

What you said would be like saying "Squirrels live in thousands of places on Earth. Therefore any place on Earth you mention is likely inhabited by squirrels"...

...but what if that place I mention is the Sahara desert?

It is true that there may be many rocky planets with an atmosphere and the potential for life processes, but that doesn't mean that EVERY star has such a planet. As has been stated above, there isn't even evidence of any planets at all in the Centauri system, let alone "inhabitable" ones.

Albeit, we also haven't confirmed there are NO planets there, because we don't have absolute methods for planet finding. So there could be planets.


edit on 5/16/2011 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 09:30 AM
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Originally posted by ButterCookie

Originally posted by vexati0n

Originally posted by Tephra
There are hundreds of millions of earth like planets in our galaxy alone. So yes, the alpha centauri system is likely inhabited.


You didn't eat your Wheaties this morning, did you. I mean... there may be that many Earth-like planets in our galaxy (no actual verification of that), but even if there are, there is zero evidence that there are any planets at all orbiting Alpha Centauri, much less whether they are inhabitable, much less whether they are actually inhabited.

Your statement is like saying "there are millions of loaves of bread in the world, so there is most likely mold growing in my cupboard" before you even checked to see if there's any bread in there.


For the millionth time, why do 'habitable' planets have to be "Earth-Like"?

I get sick of hearing how many humans feel that we are the sh$$ of the universe, that aliens have to 'prove' themselves to us, and that their planet has to be like ours to be habitable....

just because we can't live very close to a star (Venus, Mervcury) doesn't mean that no other civilization can

just because we can't live too far from a star (Neptune, Pluto) doesn't mean that no other civilization can

I always say and I'll say it again, 'We are NOT the center of the universe, physically or figuratively"


You could be right, but I very seriously doubt any civilization at all could live on a star, and that's all we've confirmed even exists at Alpha Centauri. So again - you can't say something is likely until you have reasonable evidence that it's even possible.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 09:43 AM
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reply to post by vexati0n
 


Just curious, why do you highly doubt that a civilization could live on a star? Is it because us humans can't?



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 10:01 AM
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Originally posted by ButterCookie
reply to post by vexati0n
 


Just curious, why do you highly doubt that a civilization could live on a star? Is it because us humans can't?



Uhh.. no, it's because life cannot evolve on a star due to the fact that such extreme temperatures would vaporize life; because no solid structures can exist on a star for the same reason; because unless the "civlization" was composed of ignitable gasses and vaporized space dust, it just can't. And, if the "civlization" was so composed, it would be so meaningless to us that we wouldn't be able to identify or recognize it, and therefore as far as we are concerned it might as well not exist at all.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 10:09 AM
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reply to post by robhines
 


Holy crap, did I ever howl at that last line!



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 10:23 AM
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Originally posted by vexati0n

Originally posted by ButterCookie
reply to post by vexati0n
 


Just curious, why do you highly doubt that a civilization could live on a star? Is it because us humans can't?



Uhh.. no, it's because life cannot evolve on a star due to the fact that such extreme temperatures would vaporize life; because no solid structures can exist on a star for the same reason; because unless the "civlization" was composed of ignitable gasses and vaporized space dust, it just can't. And, if the "civlization" was so composed, it would be so meaningless to us that we wouldn't be able to identify or recognize it, and therefore as far as we are concerned it might as well not exist at all.


Ummm...

but again, you are generalizing everything to be 'human-like'...

the reason that we would vaporize is because we are carbon and water based....everything in the universe does not have to be.

And if was a gaseous species, does that make it not legit?

You also stated that it would be unidentifiable or unrecognizable (to whom, US?) and WE humans determine what is life in the universe?? We barley can leave Earth pretty good and will be near death by the time we leave our own solar system. yet we determine what counts and what doesn't?



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 02:00 PM
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Originally posted by ButterCookie

Originally posted by vexati0n

Originally posted by Tephra
There are hundreds of millions of earth like planets in our galaxy alone. So yes, the alpha centauri system is likely inhabited.


You didn't eat your Wheaties this morning, did you. I mean... there may be that many Earth-like planets in our galaxy (no actual verification of that), but even if there are, there is zero evidence that there are any planets at all orbiting Alpha Centauri, much less whether they are inhabitable, much less whether they are actually inhabited.

Your statement is like saying "there are millions of loaves of bread in the world, so there is most likely mold growing in my cupboard" before you even checked to see if there's any bread in there.


For the millionth time, why do 'habitable' planets have to be "Earth-Like"?

I get sick of hearing how many humans feel that we are the sh$$ of the universe, that aliens have to 'prove' themselves to us, and that their planet has to be like ours to be habitable....

just because we can't live very close to a star (Venus, Mervcury) doesn't mean that no other civilization can

just because we can't live too far from a star (Neptune, Pluto) doesn't mean that no other civilization can

I always say and I'll say it again, 'We are NOT the center of the universe, physically or figuratively"


For the millionth time, habitable planets don't have to be Earth-like, no one says they "HAVE" to. What is said, and what is known however, is that we only have one example of life occurring in the universe and it happens to be centered around liquid water and certain conditions that would require the planet to be in the habitable zone of its' star and have other earth like qualities. If we have no reference point to start looking for life then we are literally looking into the ENTIRE UNIVERSE blind. This stance doesn't even suggest human arrogance, it suggests a logical approach necessary due to our own ignorance.

We can't assume to know things we don't know, therefore we have to work with what we do know. (Comment also in reference to the incorrect assumption that there are millions of earth like planets in our galaxy. Possible? Yes. Fact? No, not yet anyway.)




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