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Stunning video, a glimpse into what a post apocalyptic world might look like

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posted on May, 17 2011 @ 01:01 AM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


Thank you very much! I appreciate your kindness!

Its an interesting story.




posted on May, 17 2011 @ 01:52 AM
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How interesting! S&F, never heard of it before. (but being from Australia, that doesn't surprise me)

Although, being an amateur photog, I can't help but find the landscape stunning! I would love to get the opportunity to get out there and take some photos.



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 01:57 AM
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Originally posted by minkmouse
Could they not have accidentally flooded the area again? I'm aware it would have shorted other areas temporarily but couldn't something have been done for this fledgling community? So again it seem we create a problem as result of an accident and everyone just walks away. Sorry nothing to see here folks, yes they too thought it would be a grand place to hang their hats but let's move along quietly and focus elsewhere now shall we?


Kind of reminds me much the US, it's superpower status that one day just happened probably by accident and thus this is why our modern world evolved to become so strange, and it's strange politics across the Globe. Could this video be prophetic about USA and the World? Once USA is no more who is going to fix the devastated world that it will be leaving behind them?
Is this the future of our children?




posted on May, 17 2011 @ 11:26 AM
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This is how astral looks like in modern western cities



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 01:57 PM
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a post apocalyptic world would probly look something like the matrix, waterworld, or terminator. LOL



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 05:33 PM
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Incredible that something like that actually exists.

I live pretty close too.



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 05:42 PM
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S + F!

Great video, definitely makes you think.

Thanks for posting this!



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 05:42 PM
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I had to link to see the 25th years after Chernobyl Pics, as well. Then I think about Japan, in 25 years. Hmm, If humans abandon the messes they make, won't we run out of room sometime?

Awesome vid, S&F. It really hits home how destructive humans are.



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 05:43 PM
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Talked with my Grandparents today about this and they think it is also representative of what is happening with the Mississippi levees and the gulf of mexico situation.



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 09:11 PM
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This is a good example of what happens when man tries a change an ecosystem to meet their own needs. In this case it was by accident, but the exploitation was not.

And the Los Angeles area is another. There is very little naturally occuring fresh water in the greater L.A. area, and they are heavy water users. Those palm trees are not native to the area, and each one needs 40 gallons of water a day to stay healthy. Not to mention all those pools, golf courses and green grass lawns, in the desert. The ecosystem is mostly fire dependent, some seed pods only open when exposed to fire. So every time they put out a wildfire in southern California (and all similar ecosystems) they are messing with the ecology of the area.

New Orleans is another good example, as river deltas are constantly changing environments.

But we go to great lengths and expenses to keep these areas liveable for people.

Why?

Is it too radical of an idea to just give up on an area as being suitable for large populations of people?



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 12:46 AM
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Wow, I can't believe I had not heard of this place before. Though, I have seen the weird pile of art made by that man on tv or something. Guess I've learned something new today. Thank you for sharing



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 02:21 AM
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awesome video. Made me want to play fallout for some reason. But on a serious note i think Im going to try and visit that area.



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 04:04 AM
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reply to post by davespanners
 


About 8 years ago, my best friend and I drove cross-country from Chicago to Los Angeles. We decided to do it the spontaneous way, without a preplanned itinerary. The glorious roadmap being our guide, we'd point at little dots and patches of color - towns with interesting names, or points of geographical interest - and drive toward that destination.

Nearing the end of our trip, we noted a large body of water in the desert, and took a detour to go see what it was all about. When we arrived, it was as if we were suddenly sucked into a time warp. We passed ghostly remnants of opulent resorts. I kept wondering out loud, "What IS this place?....What happened?" The architecture was pure hip fifties, but the lively painted facades and vibrant spaces were now peeling, empty, eroded skeletons. There was a deep sadness emanating from these buildings. As we continued driving, the mood changed from sad - to haunted - to totally creeped out.

However, this did not dampen our resolve to remain there. We stopped at a camping area on the waterfront, and if I remember correctly it was part of the state park system. As we pulled in, the realization of just how eerily deserted the place was grabbed us. We were, after all, two girls alone with a little wilderness experience but no hardcore self defense skills. The fetid air was also capturing our attention. By the time we reached the park ranger in the little shack at the entrance of the campsite, we no longer had the desire to stick with our original plan. Neither of us wanted to admit it though, so we proceeded.

We paid a small fee and were given our receipt along with a sheet of paper that was a disclaimer of sorts... a required notice to campers. It spoke of the trials of the Salton Sea - how it came to be, where it went, and that the water was - well - essentially toxic, and wildlife in the area had been nearly extinguished. BUT, worry not... things were improving. We sat in the car, looking out onto the beautiful, expansive, post-apocolyptic sea. After a few minutes, we turned and stared at each other, silently agreeing that we were not badass enough to take on the challenge of staying overnight. So, we promptly turned around, told the ranger (rather sheepishly) that we changed our minds, and went on our way.

We drove aimlessly for awhile, trying to find another place to camp, but the more we drove the creepier and more desperate the landscape became. Even though sundown was quickly approaching, we decided to continue driving.

My biggest regret....I regret not taking any pictures. I was shooting up a storm the entire trip, but I was just so immersed in the experience of such a bizarre environment, that thoughts of photos fell by the wayside. What a shame. I would love to have visual documentation of that day, but at least I can reflect on the experience.

edit on 5/18/2011 by HolographicPrincipal because: insomniac grammar correction



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 04:24 AM
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S + F. Very cool video. I find these sorts of wastescapes to be so pretty. Even Chernobyl has it's eerie beauty. The video kind of reminds me of Fallout New Vegas. Of course it is pretty in a visit, not live there kind of way.



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 05:10 AM
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Thank you for sharing this with us Dave, I personally found the video very hard to watch, you see I am an environmentalist I do care about our planet, so many people in such positions to make change prefer to just ignore these problems until its too late. Such a shame for our childrens childrens



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 01:29 PM
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reply to post by davespanners
 


What's interesting to me is how I've spent my whole life not realizing it was manmade. I'm aware of manmade waterways wherever I've lived. I knew Lake Mead and Lake Powell were manmade as well as several smaller lakes in Arizona. I just always assumed - and I never heard anything to the contrary - that the salty basin was something akin to the Great Salt Lake, left-overs from an early sea that went away when the continent closed up.

I had no idea it was like that there, that they had promoted and started to build a tourist destination, and then it failed and became swallowed up by an environment that is still in the process of realigning itself.



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 04:58 PM
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very interesting iv heard of the name the salton sea but didnt know anything about it thankyou for this info



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 07:03 PM
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nice..cool



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 07:19 PM
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wow truly a great video really made me think about the destruction humanity can bring to this planet



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 10:34 PM
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This thread got me to look for other abandoned cesspools in America and abroad and its absolutely astounding the vast multitude of places I was directed to. I found entire cities, beach resorts, and population centers of 150,000 inhabitants and more totally abandoned throughout the world. Not necessarily around the Chernobyl disaster either.



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