what is wrong with the time the sunsets??

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posted on May, 15 2011 @ 07:23 PM
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WEll .................I was thinking the sunset is off........and it is by a few minutes.......more like 30-45 minutes.......
Here is the sunset tables........
I live in WV.......
so here it is for east coast usa
www.calendar-365.com...

says length of day is 14 hrs 27 min today.........well that is observable a lie........I am looking out my window and the sun is still up at 0822..............now I may be off 5 min or so on my clock.........but it just seems that the sunset was never this late in the day this early in the spring.............I know it was not earlier in my life or it seemed so.....
am I crazy or is the times of the earth off?
thanks for your thoughts and observations on this.......I am just curious or crazy.




posted on May, 15 2011 @ 07:28 PM
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reply to post by speaknoevil07
 


sorry forgot to add clock so you can check real time..........here is the link to the
US official clock
www.time.gov.../d/-5/java

well...........well see how long this thread lives........I probably am the only one noticing this.....and am crazy



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 07:28 PM
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I have noticed this also....
It only stays dark here 9 hrs. now...
edit on 15-5-2011 by Caji316 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 07:32 PM
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The sun does not rise or set according to the clock and calendar of humans.

It has its own clock it goes by, the universe does not adapt to us, we adapt to it.

Seems normal enough for me, adding/subtracting a minute each day to the sunrise/sunset is about the way I always remember it. The days are getting longer until June 21 then they will start getting shorter until December 21 then the days start getting longer again, then the cycle repeats. I have not noticed anything significantly off base here. If anything, we need to adjust our clocks and calendars a bit to "synchronize" things to our schedule but that does not change what the earth and sun does.

edit on 15-5-2011 by Skewed because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 07:35 PM
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I'm noticing this too. It stays light out much longer now, unusual for this time of year.
My cat is loving it because he can play outside longer



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 07:36 PM
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I actually just noticed this tonight.
Like less than an our ago I went out on the balcony for a smoke and I noticed that the sun is still setting (its gone now). Normally I wouldn't have cared but for some reason it seemed odd tonight.
I never pay attention to that, so I don't even know when its supposed to set, but it felt strange for some reason.



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 07:36 PM
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I am not sure about the actual sun dropping over the horizon, folks will argue that it is the same has it has been. BUT, I will say that each of the past few years the ambient light that is present before total black, is longer indeed. On the WC, there is ambient light until 8:15 already, this is about 20 minutes more than last year at the solstice and we are a month from that. This quality of the sun's light is changing.



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 07:39 PM
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www.theweathernetwork.com...

I live near Toronto and it seems about right here. It's currently 20:37 and it's starting to get pretty dark. In about 30 min it should be full twilight as the site says.


edit: 21:11, and yup, very accurate.
edit on 15/5/11 by AdamsMurmur because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 07:39 PM
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Ususally in the summer, it gets dark around 9PM here. It is mid May, and it isn't dark yet at 8:40PM. I will make a note to see what happens on June 21, this year. The reason I posted is that although I never looked into it, I felt the same as you. Seems light out awfully long for this time of year.



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 07:40 PM
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reply to post by speaknoevil07
 

I haven't noticed this as of yet, but then I haven't timed anything. I did however read a post somewhere where the guy was asking why the sun came out 2 days early in Greenland. Maybe this is a confirmation of your findings.
edit on 5/15/2011 by visualmiscreant because: fixed spelling



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 07:52 PM
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Call me crazy...

But I have noticed a few things over the years that no one else seems to notice.
But, it does seem like more daylight lasts longer, earlier and later than normal.
Also, I remember days in the 1980's when it seemed as though the sun was directly overhead in the spring and summer months. But it seems more and more, as years go by, the sun doesn't fully pass overhead anymore.
Almost like it stays at a lower angle in the sky and passes more towards the NE to NW than directly overhead.
I am perplexed and amused because I always remember the sun passing directly over my head when I was younger. So much as my shadow would almost be nil.
Now, I never see the sun get that high in the sky.
Maybe I don't notice the axis shifts anymore.
Maybe I am paranoid.

Mind you, I've lived in the same area for decades.


...and I am not 'crazy'.

Anyone else take notice?





posted on May, 15 2011 @ 07:57 PM
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reply to post by speaknoevil07
 


Hah that's funny, I was just talking to my wife about it being opposite!

We used to live up in Washington State and it would stay light much later, but now that we've moved to Cali a few years ago the sun sets MUCH earlier! In fact, it will be dark here when I call my family up north and they are still hanging out outside in full daylight.

Interesting how we all perceive things differently, I definitely see it as as less light and not more.


Khar



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 09:48 PM
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Several weeks ago, I noticed the sun was setting almost an hour later than it had been. Seems my wife reset the clocks for daylights savings time. (whispering to myself, "will anyone get my dry humor?")

Seriously, we know the earth's orbit is elliptical, that the earth is tilted on it's axis, that the axis of the earth wobbles, and the moon's gravity causes the earth to be out of balance (shakes) as it revolves around the earth. I do believe this could explain some of the variations in the time the sun sets/rises.

orbit and axis of the earth
Chandler Wobble



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 10:05 PM
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Originally posted by speaknoevil07
WEll .................I was thinking the sunset is off........and it is by a few minutes.......more like 30-45 minutes.......
Here is the sunset tables........
I live in WV.......
so here it is for east coast usa
www.calendar-365.com...

says length of day is 14 hrs 27 min today.........well that is observable a lie........I am looking out my window and the sun is still up at 0822..............now I may be off 5 min or so on my clock.........but it just seems that the sunset was never this late in the day this early in the spring.............I know it was not earlier in my life or it seemed so.....
am I crazy or is the times of the earth off?
thanks for your thoughts and observations on this.......I am just curious or crazy.


You are looking at a table that gives the time for the entire east coast. The time varies, obviously, depending on WHERE on the east coast you live. IT' giving you an AVERAGE. Days are longer in Florida than Maine this time of year. Just like how in the Arctic, they have basically 24 hour days in the summer, as that part of the earth tilts towards the sun.

Are you familiar with the earths orbit and tilt and it's relation to the sun and the creation of 'seasons'?

edit on 15-5-2011 by incrediblelousminds because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 10:09 PM
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Originally posted by Kharron
reply to post by speaknoevil07
 


Hah that's funny, I was just talking to my wife about it being opposite!

We used to live up in Washington State and it would stay light much later, but now that we've moved to Cali a few years ago the sun sets MUCH earlier! In fact, it will be dark here when I call my family up north and they are still hanging out outside in full daylight.

Interesting how we all perceive things differently, I definitely see it as as less light and not more.


Khar



PLEASE tell me you understand why that occurs.

In general, the length of a day varies throughout the year, and depends upon latitude. This variation is caused by the tilt of the Earth's axis of rotation with respect to the ecliptic plane of the earth around the sun. At the solstice occurring about June 20–22, the north pole is tilted toward the sun, and therefore the northern hemisphere has days ranging in duration from just over 12 hours in the southern portion of the Tropic of Cancer to 24 hours in the Arctic Circle, while the southern hemisphere has days ranging in duration from just under 12 hours in the northern portion of the Tropic of Capricorn to zero in the Antarctic Circle. At the equinox occurring about September 22–23, the poles are neither tilted toward nor away from the sun, and the duration of a day is generally about 12 hours all over the earth. At the solstice occurring about December 20–22, the south pole is tilted toward the sun, and therefore the southern hemisphere has days ranging in duration from just over 12 hours in the northern portion of the Tropic of Capricorn to 24 hours in the Antarctic Circle, whereas the northern hemisphere has days ranging in duration from just under 12 hours in the southern portion of the Tropic of Cancer to zero in the Arctic Circle. At the equinox occurring about March 19–21, the poles are again aligned so that the duration of a day is generally about 12 hours all over the earth. In each hemisphere, the higher the latitude, the shorter the day during winter. Between winter and summer solstice, the day's duration increases, and the rate of increase is larger the higher the latitude. A fast increase of day length is what allows a very short day on winter solstice at 60 degrees latitude (either north or south) to reach about 12 hours by the spring equinox, while a slower increase is required for a much longer day on winter solstice at 20 degrees latitude (again, either north or south) to reach 12 hours by the spring equinox. The rate of change of day duration is generally fastest at the equinoxes, although at high latitudes the change is similar for several weeks before and after the equinoxes. The rate of change of day duration at each solstice is zero as the change goes from positive to negative, or vice versa. Some interesting facts are as follows: On the Equator, the duration of daylight is not exactly 12 hours all the year round, but rather — due to atmospheric refraction and the size of the Sun — exceeds 12 hours by about 7 minutes each day; Because the sun is north of the equator for almost 4 days more than half the year, the duration of the average day at a given latitude in the northern hemisphere exceeds the duration of the average day at the same latitude in the southern hemisphere by a few minutes; During a few days around the equinoxes—about March 19–22 and September 21–24—both poles experience simultaneously 24 hours of daytime, due mainly to atmospheric refraction. Each pole has only one sunrise and one sunset per year, around the time of the equinoxes. Each pole’s sunrise is nearly coincident with the other’s sunset, with minor differences due mainly to atmospheric refraction.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 10:10 PM
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Whoa!
That is to weird.I just watch a show on if the earth stopped spinning today.
It's was scary.
I will try to find it and a link for you all.

It was Aftermath: When the Earth Stops Spinning on National Geographic Channel

channel.nationalgeographic.com...


The Earth revolves at 1,000 miles an hour. But what if it significantly slowed and eventually stopped? Sea levels at the equator drop and locations surrounded by water would dry out. With a loss of atmosphere, the Earth could no longer support human life. And each side of the Earth will be stuck in day or night for six months at a time. The dark side is lethally cold and the light side is bathed in deadly solar radiation. See how humans and creatures might cope in this changing world. Read more: channel.nationalgeographic.com...


edit on 15-5-2011 by kdog1982 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 10:13 PM
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At the outset in 1966 Daylight Savings Time was scheduled for the last Sunday in April. But this has changed:

Edit To Add:

From 1945 to 1966, there was no federal law regarding daylight saving time, so states and localities were free to choose whether to observe it, and could choose when it began and ended. By 1962, the transportation industry found the lack of nationwide consistency in time observance confusing enough to push for federal regulation. This drive resulted in the Uniform Time Act of 1966 (P.L. 89-387). The act mandated standard time within the established time zones and provided for advanced time: clocks would be advanced one hour beginning at 2:00 a.m. on the last Sunday in April and turned back one hour at 2:00 a.m. on the last Sunday in October. States were allowed to exempt themselves from DST as long as the entire state did so. If a state chose to observe DST, the time changes were required to begin and end on the established dates. In 1968, Arizona became the first state to exempt itself from DST. In 1972, the act was amended (P.L. 92-267), allowing those states split between time zones to exempt either the entire state or that part of the state lying within a different time zone. The newly created Department of Transportation (DOT) was given the power to enforce the law. Currently, the following states and territories do not observe DST: Arizona, Hawaii, American Samoa, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands.[2]
en.wikipedia.org...



From 1987 to 2006, daylight saving time in the United States began on the first Sunday of April...By the Energy Policy Act of 2005, daylight saving time (DST) was extended in the United States beginning in 2007. DST currently starts on the second Sunday of March, which is three or four weeks earlier than in the past
en.wikipedia.org...


This might have something to do with it. But what's the real reason for the changes. Is something else changing that they hope we won't notice by moving it up, and up again?
edit on 5/15/2011 by this_is_who_we_are because: ETA



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 10:17 PM
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I just found something that may help
It is a sun set calculator



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 10:23 PM
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I was just on a website today stating the dun rose 2 days earlier than expected in Alaska. Also stating sunrise/sunset times projected were not quite right. I'll try to find the site, I thought I marked it but I'm not seeing it.



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 10:28 PM
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I don't know about the sunrise/sunset.
BUT, when the sun hit my arm as I walked outside at 7 am, it felt like boiling water had hit me.
It has NEVER felt like that here in may at 7 am.






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