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Timeline for Area 51

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posted on Mar, 26 2003 @ 11:16 PM
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Area 51 Timeline

Source: Unknown

April 1955:

Under orders from Kelly Johnson Lockheed test pilot Tony LeVier searches for a remote area where the U2 can be tested. Finding Groom Lake he returns with Kelly Johnson and a CIA representative to investigate further. Johnson decided that the runway would be placed to the south of Groom Lake and work begins under the direction of Lockheed Skunk Works.

July 1995:

At a cost of $800,000, "The Ranch" is completed. "The Ranch" consisted of 3 hangers, runway, mess hall, control tower as well as many mobile homes.

July 24 1955:

The first U2 prototype is shipped via C-124 transport plane from the Lockheed Skunk Works to Groom Lake.

August 4 1955:

The first flight of the U2 took part at Groom Lake.

August 19 1955:

President Eisenhower signs the Executive Order 10633 restricting airspace over Groom Lake.

November 17 1955:

A C-54 transport plane crashes into Mt. Charleston en route to Groom Lake resulting in the death of the 9 civilian workers and 5 military.

Fall 1956:

6 Pilots from SAC start training in the U2 at Groom Lake.

April 4 1957:

A U2 equipped with radar spoofing equipment crashes during testing near Groom lake, killing the pilot.

June 20 1958:

Public Land Order 1662 is enacted by Roger Ernst resulting in 60 square miles being withdrawn for use "by the Atomic Energy Commission in connection with the Nevada Test Site".

November 1959:

A fuel scale mockup of an A-12 is shipped to Groom Lake for radar signature testing.

September 1960:

A major expansion of the Groom Lake facility begins in order to accommodate the A-12 (OXCART) program. This construction would not be completed until mid 1964.

September 7 1960:

Work begins on lengthening and strengthening the existing runway which was 5,000' to 8,500'. The work was completed by November.

Late 1961:

Colonel Robert J. Holbury is named commander of the Groom Lake base.

Early 1962:

The fuel tank farm is completed with a capacity of 1,320,000 gallons.

January 15 1962:

The restricted airspace over Groom Lake is expanded due to a request from the Air Force citing an immediate and urgent need due to a classified project.

February 26 1962:

The first A-12 Blackbird arrives at Groom Lake for testing.

April 26 1962:

First flight of the A-12.

February 1963:

The first 5 CIA pilots arrive.

July 20 1963:

During testing an A-12 reaches Mach 3.

August 7 1963:

The first flight of the YF-12A.

July 9 1964:

An A-12 crashed while on the final approach to Groom Lake. The pilot managed to eject at an altitude of 500'.

Early 1965:

The OXCART construction was completed and the base population has reached 1,835.

February 27 1965:

First test of the D-21 drone launched from an A-12.

December 28 1965:

An A-12 cashed immediately after takeoff. The pilot ejected and survived.

March 5 1966:

First free flight test of the D-21 near Point Mugu launched from an A-12.

July 30 1966:

A D-21 launched from an A-12 over Point Mugu hit the A-12 destroying it. Both pilots ejected but one drowned before being rescued.

1967:

The Defence Intelligence Agency acquired a MIG 21 which was shipped to Groom Lake for testing.

January 5 1967:

An A-12 ran out of fuel while 70 miles east of Groom Lake and crashed. The pilot was killed.

January 10 1967:

It is decided to phase out the A-12 in favor of the SR-71. The phase out was set to be complete by 1968.

June 21 1968:

The last flight of the A-12 s from Groom Lake to Palmdale. The entire fleet was put in secret storage.

August 28 1968:

The US Geological Survey takes an aerial photo of the Groom Lake base as part of a routine high altitude survey. This photo was available until 1994 when the government withdrew it.

November 16 1977:

" Have Blue" the F-117A Stealth fighter prototype was shipped to Groom Lake.

December 1 1977:

First flight of the "Have Blue".

May 4 1978:

The first "Have Blue" crashed after its landing gear was damaged.

July 20 1978:

The first flight of the second "Have Blue" prototype.

July 11 1979:

The second "Have Blue" prototype crashed 35 miles NW of Groom Lake due to an engine fire.

June 18 1981:

First flight of the production F-117A stealth fighter.

February 1982:

First flight of "Tactic Blue".

April 1982:

The existence of the A-12 was declassified.

April 20 1982:

The first production model of the F-117A crashed during tests.

October 15 1982:

Beginning of tests with second F-117A production model.

Late 1982:

The first Stealth fighter squadron begins moving from Groom Lake to new facilities at the Tonopah Test Range.

June 1983:

First flight of HALSOL, which was a solar powered high altitude UAV. These tests ran for 2 months.

Early 1984:

The Air Force takes another 89,000 acres north and west of Groom Lake.

April 26 1984:

General Robert Bond was killed when the MIG 23 he was traveling on crashed into Little Skul Mountain.

1985:

"Tactic Blue" program ends.

December 1987:

Congress authorizes the Air Force's land seizure.

July 17 1988:

A photo of Groom Lake was taken by a Soviet spy satellite which are destined for publication in a number of publications.

May 1989:

Robert Lazar's first interview on KLAS-TV in Las Vegas. He stated that he worked at Papoose Lake, southwest of Groom Lake to reverse engineer captured extraterrestrial craft.

October 18 1993:

The Air Force files a notice in the Federal Register seeking to take another 3972 acres from public use in order to hamper views of Area 51 from Freedom Ridge and Whitesides Peak.

April 10 1995:

Freedom Ridge and Whitesides Peak are closed to the public.

January 1996:

It was reported that the Bechtel Corporation begun work to lengthen the second runway by 5,000'.




posted on Mar, 27 2003 @ 04:08 PM
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Good info! Except for the "Robert Lazar" reference.

Usually if I am reading something and see his name I discredit the info and become disintrested. I am glad it appeared at the end.



posted on Jul, 28 2005 @ 04:36 PM
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it is a very well put togethter time line but you need to expand on it over the years. there are a few holes here and there but basicly thats how it occured



posted on Jul, 29 2005 @ 08:57 AM
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Back when I worked on the Area 51/ Groom Lake Research project, one of our goals was to build a timeline of the Groom Lake base. Fred lead the effort to create this timeline. While I can't account for things that have been found since, I will say this time line is 100% accurate b]Based on the Information We Could Get At the Time!

Circa 1941-45:
Two dirt landing strips (one approx. 5,000' and one 7,000' long) are scraped into the bare desert floor, on the east side of Groom Lake. They are used as an outlying training strip for flyers based at Nellis. The strips are abandoned at the end of WWII and quickly deteriorate.

November, 1954 The CIA memo that started Aquatone and Ult. Area 51 This is the actual CIA memo that recommends the production of the CIA's U2 and ultimately lead to the founding of Area 51 for testing.
www.gwu.edu...

April, 1955:
Lockheed test pilot, Tony LeVier, under orders from Kelly Johnson, searches for remote site to test the U-2. He finds Groom Lake and returns with Kelly Johnson and a representative of the CIA. Johnson decides to place the runway at the south end of Groom Lake. Work begins on the facility there under the direction of Lockheed Skunk Works. (1)

(This is also confirmed by Ben Rich's "Skunk Works" and Kelly Johnson�s " Kelly" Rich says "Tony Levier" found the base, Kelly claims he did, but the time is similar for both.)

July, 1955:
Work on "The Ranch" is complete at a cost of $800,000. It consists of three hangars, control tower, mess hall, runway, and numerous mobile homes. The first U-2 was shipped out on July 23. (1)

July 24, 1955:
The first U-2 prototype is shipped via C-124 transport plane from the Lockheed Skunk Works in Burbank to Groom Lake. (9)

August, 1955:
Project oilstone between the CIA and AF
www.gwu.edu...

August 4, 1955:
First flight of the U-2 at Groom Lake. (1)

August 19, 1955:
Executive Order 10633 is signed by President Eisenhower restricting the airspace over Groom Lake for the first time. The rectangular airspace is an extension of the Test Site airspace (known as "The Las Vegas Project") at its northeast corner and measures 5 by 9 nautical miles. (8)

November 17, 1955:
A C-54 transport, enroute to Groom from Burbank, crashes into Mt. Charleston killing all aboard, 9 civilian workers and 5 military. (5)

Fall, 1956:
Six pilots from SAC start training at Groom in the U-2. (1)

April 4, 1957:
A U-2 with radar spoofing equipment (#341, the first prototype) crashes during testing near Pioche, killing the pilot. (1), (9)

June 20, 1958:
Public Land Order 1662 is enacted by Roger Ernst, Assistant Secretary of the Interior, withdrawing 38,400 acres (60 square miles) for use "..by the Atomic Energy Commission in connection with the Nevada Test Site." The area, 6 miles North/South and 10 miles East/West, forms the first "box" around the Groom base, beneath the already restricted airspace.

September 21, 1959:
The USGS snaps a photo (13-146) of the Groom Lake base as part of a routine mapping program, which is still available.

November, 1959:
A full scale mockup of an A-12 is shipped to Groom, via truck, for radar signature testing. (4)

September, 1960:
Construction begins on a major expansion of the Groom Lake facility to accommodate the A-12 (OXCART) program on behalf of the CIA. This period of construction is not be complete until mid 1964. (4)

September 7, 1960:
Work begins on lengthening and strengthening the existing 5,000' runway to 8,500'. It is completed November 15. (4)

August 11, 1961:
The newly created R-4808 restricted airspace becomes effective, covering the Test Site and Groom Lake. Use is restricted from the surface to FL600. The restricted airspace over Groom Lake remains 5 by 9 nautical miles in size. (8) (26 FR 6233)

Late 1961:
Colonel Robert J. Holbury, USAF, is named Commander of the Groom base. (4)

Early 1962:
The fuel tank farm is completed with a capacity of 1,320,000 gallons. (4)

January 15, 1962:
The restricted airspace directly over Groom Lake (R-4808) is expanded to 22 by 20 nautical miles. The basis of the expansion was a request by the Department of the Air Force citing an immediate and urgent need due to a classified project. This creates the "Groom box" as it exists today. (8) (27 FR 205)

February 26, 1962:
The first A-12 Blackbird (#121) is brought to Groom via truck for testing. (4) (Ben Rich says January, 1962)

April 26, 1962:
First flight test of the A-12 Blackbird (#121) at Groom Lake. (4)

February, 1963:
The first 5 CIA A-12 pilots (Collins, Ray, Skliar, Sullivan and Walter) arrive at Groom Lake. (9)

May 24, 1963:
An A-12 (#123) crashes due to pitot icing 14 miles south of Wendover, Utah. The pilot, Collins, survives. (4)

July, 1963: memo from CIA outlining steps to transpher control of the AF-12, the R-12 and Tagboard to the USAF

July 20, 1963:
An A-12 finally achieves Mach 3 in testing. (9)

August 7, 1963:
First flight of the YF-12A (#1001) at Groom Lake. The YF-12A was a Mach 3 interceptor, based on the A-12 design. (9)

July 9, 1964:
An A-12 (#133) crashes on final approach to Groom. The pilot, Park, ejects at an altitude of 500' and survives. (4)

Beginning 1965:
The OXCART construction project is now complete and the base population has reached 1,835. (4)

December 28, 1965:
An A-12 (#126) crashes immediately after takeoff from Groom. The pilot, Vojvodich ejects and survives. (4)

March 5, 1966:
First free flight test of the D-21 drone near Point Mugu, launched from a Blackbird out of Groom Lake. (9)

July 30, 1966:
A D-21 drone is launched over Point Mugu, but strikes the A-12 (#135), destroying it. The two crew members eject, but one drowns before being pulled from the sea. All future launches of D-21 were to be done by B-52s. (9)

1967:
The Defense Intelligence Agency acquires a MIG 21 which it ships to Groom Lake for testing and names the program "Have Doughnut". This is the start of the ongoing MIG testing program that likely runs to this day. (9)

January 5, 1967:
An A-12 (#125) runs out of fuel 70 miles east of Groom and crashes. The pilot, Ray, ejects, but fails to seperate from the seat and is killed. (4)

January 10, 1967:
The decision is made to phase out the A-12s in favor of the SR-71. The phase out is to be completed by January, 1968. (9)

May 22, 1967:
The first of the A-12s leave Groom for Kadena Air Base on Okinawa for the beginning of "Black Shield", their first operational deployment. "Black Shield" involved reconnaissance flights over North Vietnam. (9)

June 21, 1968:
The last flight of an A-12, #131, was made from Groom to Palmdale and the entire fleet was put in secret storage. (9)

August 28, 1968:
The US Geological Survey snaps an aerial photo of the Groom Lake complex as part of a routine high altitude survey. This photo, since published in numerous places, was available to the public until early 1994, when it was withdrawn from release by the government.


February, 1972
This document essential IMHO kicks the CIA out of the SIGINT business and installs the NSA. The NSA in turn has to be responsive CIA requests for info. Dated in 1976. It is reasonable to assume that the CIA would have to turn over any air based sigint assets it owned at the time. Perhaps this is the entry point of the NSA to area 51.
www.gwu.edu...

November 16, 1977:
"Have Blue" (#1001), the F-117A Stealth fighter prototype, is shipped to Groom Lake for flight testing. (9)

December 1, 1977:
First flight of the Have Blue at Groom Lake. (2)

May 4, 1978:
The first Have Blue prototype crashes at Groom after its landing gear is damaged and was unable to land. (2)

July 20, 1978:
First flight of the second Have Blue prototype (#1002). (9)

July 11, 1979:
The second Have Blue prototype crashes 35 miles NW of Groom, due to an engine fire. (1)

May, 1981:
First production F-117A is airlifted to Groom for testing. (1)

June 18, 1981:
First flight of the production F-117A Stealth fighter (#780) at Groom. (1)

February, 1982:
First flight of "TACIT BLUE" (demonstrator for stealth technology) at Groom . (7)

April, 1982:
The existence of the A-12 aircraft was finally declassified. (10)

April 20, 1982:
The first production model of the F-117A crashes at Groom during Air Force acceptance tests. (1)

October 15, 1982:
Beginning of acceptance flight tests with second production model of F-117A. (1)

Late 1982:
First Stealth fighter squadron begins moving from Groom into new facilities at the Tonopah Test Range. (1), (9)

1983: Beginning of ATB (AkA B-2) testing begins and continues to this day

April 18, 1983:
Four Greenpeace protestors trespassed just south of Area 51 on a 5 day trek to sneak into the Nevada Test Site. (9)

June, 1983:
First flight of HALSOL at Groom Lake. HALSOL was a solar powered high altitude, UAV. The test program ran two months. (9)

March, 1984:
The Air Force posts armed guards along the access points to the 89,000 acres of public land to the east and north of Groom, expanding the borders. The guards request the public not to enter the area, thus effectively (and apparently illegally) closing the land to public use. (9)

April 26, 1984:
General Robert Bond is killed when the MIG 23 he was flying out of Groom crashes into Little Skull Mountain on the Nevada Test Site. (9)

August, 1984:
In Congressional hearings concerning the land seizure, the Air Force representative (John Rittenhouse) makes the statement that while the Air Force had no legal authority to seize the land (as far as he knew) the decision to do so was made at a much higher level than his. He would only go into the details in a closed session. (5)

1985:
Tacit Blue program ends. (7)

December, 1987:
Congress finally authorizes the Air Force's land seizure. (2)

July 17, 1988:
A Soviet spy satellite takes a photo of the Groom Lake area destined for release in a number of publications, including Popular Science and The Lazar Poster.

May, 1989:
Robert Lazar's first interviews are broadcast on KLAS-TV in Las Vegas. Lazar states he had been hired to reverse engineer extraterrestrial craft at a facility at Papoose Lake, just southwest of Groom Lake. Lazar's appearance focuses the first widespread public interest on
the Groom Lake area.

1991:
Detachment 5, the remaining test fleet of YF-117 move to Palmdale, CA

1992:
Boeing Phantom Works launched the \"Bird of Prey\" technology demonstrator in 1992


October 18, 1993:
The Air Force files a notice in the Federal Register seeking to withdraw another 3972 acres from public use to curtail public viewing of the Groom base from Freedom Ridge and Whitesides Peak. (3)

April, 1994:
Popular Science magazine appears, featuring a satellite photo of the Groom Lake base on its cover and containing a lengthy article on the base and its history, thus igniting mainstream media interest in the facility.

April 10, 1995:
Freedom Ridge and Whitesides Peak are officially closed to all public access. (3)

May 1995 :
EPA and the Air Force affirmed by a memorandum of agreement that EPA w ill continue to have access at the Groom Lake facility for purposes of administering the environmental laws and that the Air Force is committed to complying with RCRA at the location. The details of the issues resulting in the agreement are classified. According to the director of EPA's Office of Federal Facilities Enforcement, EPA is fulfilling its oversight responsibility at the facility. However, he said he was uncertain of the extent to which other such highly classified federal facilities-- or areas within facilities-- may exist and whether their research operations are in environmental compliance.

September 1995:
President Clinton exempted the Air Force's classified facility near Groom Lake, Nevada from the public disclosure provisions of RCRA, determining that the exemption was in the paramount interest of the United States.

January, 1996:
The Bechtel Corporation is reported to have begun work lengthening the secondary runway (14L-32R) by 5,000'. (3)

1996-1999: Boeing Phantom Works launched the \"Bird of Prey\" technology demonstrator in 1992, and it flew 38 times between 1996 and 1999 before it was retired, spokesman Jim Bafaro said. Its existence was revealed after many of its breakthrough technologies became standard in the industry.


Here is all the information on dates that I have. This timeline came from the Groom Lake Research Project here at ATS. Hope it help you!

Tim
September, 1999
Reports that ELECTROCHROMATIC PANELS being tested at Groom Lake/AREA 51[



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