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Would the New Madrid Fault affect Canada?

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posted on May, 15 2011 @ 03:49 PM
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Since there is a lot of hype about this New Madrid quake, I have come to ask myself If I would be affected by it. I live in the bottommost part of Ontario, and am surrounded by lakes.

If there was to be a quake, would Canada (specifically the bottommost of Ontario) be affected?

Sorry if this is the wrong forum, couldn't put my finger on where to ask such a thing.
edit on 15-5-2011 by Conscious because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 15 2011 @ 03:53 PM
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That is a good question as i am in the bottom of Ontario too. how badly would we be affected?



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 04:00 PM
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Good question. The NMF is not the typical fault one finds places like the west coast. Althoug we have tremors that are sometimes felt, the quake of 1811-12 caused the ground, which has a high quality of sand to just liquifiy. Witnesses reported seeing geysers of sand.
Yes, there were tremors and during the main quake, it rang the church bells in Boston. Of course, due to the nature of the soil, my area just sank. I would imagine the NMF quake would be felt in Canada, but I don't think there would be any damage.
The maps I have seen that project damage and loss of land mass show the Gulf of Mexico reaching to St. Louis. Of, course those maps are just guesses, and probably not even educated ones.



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 04:00 PM
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Highly unlikely. The Canadian Shield would prevent that. What a shield is:


A shield is generally a large area of exposed Precambrian crystalline igneous and high-grade metamorphic rocks that form tectonically stable areas. In all cases, the age of these rocks is greater than 570 million years and sometimes dates back 2 to 3.5 billion years. They have been little affected by tectonic events following the end of the Precambrian Era, and are relatively flat regions where mountain building, faulting, and other tectonic processes are greatly diminished compared with the activity that occurs at the margins of the shields and the boundaries between tectonic plates.


en.wikipedia.org...

That excludes the west coast though as they are on the Cascadia Subduction Zone.
edit on 15-5-2011 by intrepid because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 04:02 PM
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reply to post by intrepid
 


Well there is the info i was looking for. Thanx



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 04:06 PM
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it will effect all life
on this rock

this is a major feather in the cap
of all agenda 21 proponents



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 04:06 PM
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reply to post by intrepid
 


shield wrong,,,, everyone knows its "Supreme Headquarters, International Espionage, Law-Enforcement Division"


canadian humour,,,, wolverine too ..nice



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 04:09 PM
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Does the Canadian shield extend to where the rocky mountains are located?



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 04:16 PM
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reply to post by blackhawk420
 


Sorry, can't answer that. I can say though that the Rockies are "new" mountains by geology standards. There is a lot of tectonic activity there. Lived on Vancouver Island for 6 years. Lots of activity. Also there is another mountain range between them and the Pacific. The Coastal Mountains. Do we have an expert around here that could answer this?



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 04:19 PM
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Originally posted by blackhawk420
Does the Canadian shield extend to where the rocky mountains are located?


No, but the R. Mountains are their own shield that would help. Here is the shield. The N. Madrid is of course below this.







edit on 15-5-2011 by jude11 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 04:29 PM
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Originally posted by jude11

Originally posted by blackhawk420
Does the Canadian shield extend to where the rocky mountains are located?


No, but the R. Mountains are their own shield that would help. Here is the shield. The N. Madrid is of course below this.







edit on 15-5-2011 by jude11 because: (no reason given)


The data I got from that picture was that anybody below the red, which is the bottommost of ontario (close to Detroit) is going to be affected to some degree?



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 04:32 PM
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Originally posted by jude11

+ this:

Here's how the December 16, 1811 quake was felt. From here (Tecumseh And The New Madrid Earthquake).


It depends on how big the next big New Madrid quake will be, and where the epicentre is. But it seems like Canada is safe. Maybe it'll impact the economy, but probably no structural damage whatsoever.



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 04:33 PM
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yea i saw that too and was wondering the same thing...im below the red too



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 04:41 PM
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reply to post by jaycen420
 


For anyone to predict what will happen in the event of the N. Madrid acting up is a guess at minimum. It would all depend on the MAG and depth of course. It does make sense that the shield could at be least a stopping point for a lesser quake and even act as an absorber in that event.

If we are talking about an 8,9,10 MAG...I would say that all bets are off tho. That type of unleashed power won't be playing by the rules IMO.

Here's some more info:

www.forbiddenknowledgetv.com...


One continuation of this fault goes from St. Louis up to and right through downtown Chicago into Lake Michigan. Another continuation of this fault starts at St. Louis and goes more or less straight up to within 20 miles of the South-Western edge of Lake of the Woods, Ontario. it stops there because it runs into the Canadian Shield tectonic plate, which is larger and is very stable.







edit on 15-5-2011 by jude11 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 06:24 PM
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Originally posted by blackhawk420
Does the Canadian shield extend to where the rocky mountains are located?


I've seen a miltary map with UTAH underwater somewhere, so I'm not sure that all the tall mountains to the west of North America will hold. But that map also showed the whole coast along BC, new ocean, yet I was told that the west coast of Canada would rise up, due to the plates, actually the Cascadia region too, north of Mount St. Helen's, in the event of something affecting all the plates, a crustal event.

It woudn't be very safe during the rise and teutonic plates shifting and reforming in the west and southern rocky's either for that matter.

I actually think Quebec looks like a great place to be overall.



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 06:28 PM
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I am pretty happy to live on the Great Canadian Shield!

Also great for rock "hunting"



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 06:38 PM
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amethyst mines abound on the shield, glad i live here and not somewhere more susceptable to quakez



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 07:40 PM
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Even though we live in a low seismic zone, eastern Canada still experiences about 450 earthquakes a year - mostly below magnitude 2.5. You can check with Natural Resources Canada for historical seismicity and causes ...

Earthquake Zones in Eastern Canada



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 08:59 PM
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what about lower mainland BC?



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 09:12 PM
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A map of the Madrid fault line.

I can understand why one in Canada
would be concerned as I am in N.
Indiana.



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