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The Quiet Eye

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posted on May, 14 2011 @ 09:07 PM
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I wasn't really sure where to post this since it since on a blurred border of Psychology and Sports and it is not really so much a conspiracy.

I just read in one of my school books about studies regarding the "quiet eye," that experts in a particular physical activity tend to look at (for example) shooting a putt in a particular way which allows for greater success while less talented players have their eyes succumb to saccades (fast movement of the eye) which we all experience which produces less accuracy.

I was wondering if anyone on here has more information on this particular skill and how to reproduce/train it to optimize performance in sports (my interest would be regarding martial arts).

I don't really know much about it but perhaps it could have something to do with a trance-like or meditative state, a pure focus, which allows the eye to stop its fidgeting and truly focus on the task at hand.

This is also a proven technique so people don't decide to flame this thread with nonsense. Teams of players have been trained in this technique and performance has improved across the board.

Thanks




posted on May, 15 2011 @ 01:37 AM
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reply to post by ThisIsMyName
 


When partaking in whatever activity you want all you need to do is focus. Lose yourself in what you're doing. Stop thinking and just do. You will most likely only reach this level of focus initially with something you truly enjoy. I find when I reach it I lose track of time, I block out outside noises/people, and I get really upset when I'm forced out of this state. (it's kinda like being woken up really fast) I guess you could call it a very superficial meditative state. The part of your brain that does the talking gets quiet(not to be confused with silent) and the reactionary part gets really fast. to train it I'd suggest doing an activity that you are an expert in. But you may have to do it for awhile; meaning at least an hour or two per session. At least 1 to 2 sessions per day for at least a few weeks. Doesn't have to be exactly concurrent.
edit on 15-5-2011 by ScRuFFy63 because: Extra thought.

edit on 15-5-2011 by ScRuFFy63 because: grammar



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 01:41 AM
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Its the expectation to win that is the problem, for example with golf, if you just hit the ball for the sake of hitting it, and continue, the reward being the pleasure of hitting the ball, then over time your technique will automatically result in being the most efficient movement.

Although there seems to be a clear winner in many sports, when you look at things in greater depth, some might achieve remarkably well due to other factors such as concentration and determination, taking the hard road, where others benefit from the sheer amount of time and experience in playing the sport. What sets the champions apart, is that they have both of the abovementioned factors.
edit on 15-5-2011 by SystemResistor because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 01:43 AM
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When your sparring just fully observe your target.



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 03:42 AM
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Originally posted by ThisIsMyName
I wasn't really sure where to post this since it since on a blurred border of Psychology and Sports and it is not really so much a conspiracy.

I just read in one of my school books about studies regarding the "quiet eye," that experts in a particular physical activity tend to look at (for example) shooting a putt in a particular way which allows for greater success while less talented players have their eyes succumb to saccades (fast movement of the eye) which we all experience which produces less accuracy.

I was wondering if anyone on here has more information on this particular skill and how to reproduce/train it to optimize performance in sports (my interest would be regarding martial arts).

I don't really know much about it but perhaps it could have something to do with a trance-like or meditative state, a pure focus, which allows the eye to stop its fidgeting and truly focus on the task at hand.

This is also a proven technique so people don't decide to flame this thread with nonsense. Teams of players have been trained in this technique and performance has improved across the board.

Thanks


This might be helpful: When I was messing around with kendo with my bro- in law(he didn't tell me he was competent in it grr) I was able to temporary negate his greater strength and skill with a mind trick.

First form a ball in the forehead area of your brain. Expand the ball till your forehead feels heavy from the pressure. Transfer the heavy feeling/pressure to the top side middles of your head, emptying your forehead(should feel an emptiness, has to be in a kind of angle shooting to the back of your neck on both sides kind of as but make sure it doesn't transfer to the direct side of your head,that would be far more defensive and for sports could end up hurting someone by accident[more flight/fight, less instinctive concentration]).

The effect doesn't last too long and best not to do it if your too tired(if your tired your better off forming a small ball in your forehead and keeping the pressure at a constant, excellent trick when tired and stuck driving).
edit on 15-5-2011 by korathin because: fixed a messup in the long (...........) part.


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Your brain, your seat of consciousness/perspective of being, is a muscle like any other in your body. You can "flex" it, relax it and do somethings that are in-between. Your best off trying to move the muscles around the base of your ear's and move inward from there.


edit on 15-5-2011 by korathin because: (no reason given)




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