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Genographic Project and ulterior motives?

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posted on May, 14 2011 @ 07:57 PM
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I am an avid supporter of National Geographic. I get their magazines. I follow their research closely. I give them large amounts of money every year to support that research. But I'm curious to know what ATS'ers think of their highly touted Genographic Project....especially in light of the blood types threads that were recently on fire last week?

Die hard conspiracy theorists seem to think the elite are so dedicated to the mapping of DNA and blood, in general, due to various reasons - spiritual and scientific. So...given the purpose of the Genographic Project is to map the DNA of the current human population. What do you think is behind that?

For those unfamiliar with the Genographic Project:




Where do you really come from? And how did you get to where you live today? DNA studies suggest that all humans today descend from a group of African ancestors who—about 60,000 years ago—began a remarkable journey.

The Genographic Project is seeking to chart new knowledge about the migratory history of the human species by using sophisticated laboratory and computer analysis of DNA contributed by hundreds of thousands of people from around the world. In this unprecedented and of real-time research effort, the Genographic Project is closing the gaps of what science knows today about humankind's ancient migration stories.

The Genographic Project is a multi-year research initiative led by National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Dr. Spencer Wells. Dr. Wells and a team of renowned international scientists and IBM researchers, are using cutting-edge genetic and computational technologies to analyze historical patterns in DNA from participants around the world to better understand our human genetic roots. The three components of the project are: to gather field research data in collaboration with indigenous and traditional peoples around the world; to invite the general public to join the project by purchasing a Genographic Project Public Participation Kit; and to use proceeds from Genographic Public Participation Kit sales to further field research and the Genographic Legacy Fund which in turn supports indigenous conservation and revitalization projects. The Project is anonymous, non-medical, non-profit and all results will be placed in the public domain following scientific peer publication.



National Geographic's Genographic Project




posted on May, 14 2011 @ 08:17 PM
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The only thing I'll say about this is that there is no way I would trust people I don't know using technology I don't understand with something I own outright. My DNA.

There is no guarantee as to what it will be used for and who will have access to it.

Paranoid? I prefer to think of it as cautious.
edit on 14-5-2011 by jude11 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 14 2011 @ 09:10 PM
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Originally posted by jude11
The only thing I'll say about this is that there is no way I would trust people I don't know using technology I don't understand with something I own outright. My DNA.

There is no guarantee as to what it will be used for and who will have access to it.

Paranoid? I prefer to think of it as cautious.
edit on 14-5-2011 by jude11 because: (no reason given)


Jude,

Interesting (and probably prudent) concept....but who is to say that they don't already have your DNA? Have you ever given blood or had your blood tested in lab as ordered by a doctor?
edit on 14-5-2011 by CIAGypsy because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 14 2011 @ 09:15 PM
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Originally posted by CIAGypsy

Originally posted by jude11
The only thing I'll say about this is that there is no way I would trust people I don't know using technology I don't understand with something I own outright. My DNA.

There is no guarantee as to what it will be used for and who will have access to it.

Paranoid? I prefer to think of it as cautious.
edit on 14-5-2011 by jude11 because: (no reason given)


Jude,

Interesting (and probably prudent) concept....but who is to say that they don't already have your DNA? Have you ever given blood or had your blood tested in lab as ordered by a doctor?
edit on 14-5-2011 by CIAGypsy because: (no reason given)


I do understand the possibility of that being a fact and most likely.

But I won't line up for it.



posted on May, 14 2011 @ 09:28 PM
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That's very interesting. No, I won't line up for it and don't even tell doctors anything about your family health history ...they all died of old age is the best thing to say. There are many good reasons to take this approach including if you have to buy "health insurance" in the US.



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 05:53 PM
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reply to post by CIAGypsy
 


For some odd reason, it doesn't set off my klaxons. Probably because of my long-standing love for the publication. (My grandmother had every issue since 1954 filed on bookshelves in her basement.
) Certainly, if I were of a mind to pursue some nefarious gene-theft or selective breeding scheme, I'd look for a venerable and universally liked institution to front it.

Will I be lining up to contribute to the gene bank? Probably not.



posted on May, 21 2011 @ 08:55 AM
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Originally posted by mistermonculous
reply to post by CIAGypsy
 


Certainly, if I were of a mind to pursue some nefarious gene-theft or selective breeding scheme, I'd look for a venerable and universally liked institution to front it.



Interesting thought. Wasn't one that I was actually considering but now you've given me food for thought...


I have seen numerous threads on ATS about bloodlines. I had theorized that perhaps it might be "someone's" way of tracking down descendants of certain "missing" bloodlines...

Chew on that....
edit on 21-5-2011 by CIAGypsy because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 21 2011 @ 10:25 AM
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reply to post by CIAGypsy
 


Okay, I'm interested. Missing bloodlines? Please explain.



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 10:21 PM
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To understand it is required to think about year 1900 for example where mass of population was in state of zombie behavior compared to today state.

population 1900
Zombie: writing skills are 0, brain stimulation of brain parts is near zero, many parts of brain not used and not stimulated. (when u dont use some part of brain it is not developing, no sinapse connections) visual, audio, touch brain raw data input: no stimulation. Brain use (very limited), more limited because they can't read/write and use only speech input/output from neighborhood.

women dress code: to use full long skirts to block whole sunlight because logically they want, because of programming of their fathers and mothers, to decrease lifespan and produce cancer .
to support all uninteligent actions at all cost and to use no more that 1% of brain with total resistance to technology.

thinking: how to buy more cattle and to eat/drink and earn money (if possible to earn/own continent without reason)

How to program kids to think same stop all progress and children to live in same house where their parents live without change (if possible 1000 years), same thinking, same low zombie level, same language, low hygiene, same religion (with resistance to change religion and to enforce their children to think same), take more money then parents) with total resistance to change.

DNA problem (year 1900) was thinking how to 1 couple produce 10-20 kids more and increase population without control (until no food and water to sustain life) and another problem is what you eat you became that over time.

so human who generational works with/eats rat/wolf or other animal will change/mutate/contain dna to rat/wolf/ over 10000 years.
conclusion why dna base is required? to know what animal they are and how they are reproduced between them/each other.
So system parameters were set to destruction of human race over time.
There were exceptions of technology and human ability like Nikola Tesla at time.
edit on 9/29/2012 by B3... because: (no reason given)





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