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More evidence Obama's new birth certificate is fake

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posted on May, 13 2011 @ 10:18 AM
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Originally posted by zaintdead
reply to post by ringing
 


yes but the white surrounding the text does not have the same smaller pixels as the black text.


the white layer seems to be a grayscale layer, so it will have finer pixels as opposed to the bitmap areas. To me the white appears to be a mask or something, but if you also look at the numbers that are still in grayscale, such as the number 1 at the end of the cert number, its pixels appear to be the same as the "white" behind it. showing that the bitmap as opposed to grayscale areas have a different "coarseness" of the pixels.




posted on May, 13 2011 @ 10:21 AM
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reply to post by Benevolent Heretic
 


Thanks, BH. I'm going to run some experiments myself tonight after Hubby gets home and he can help me with our scanner. I'd like to see it happen.

I'm going to make a document, scan it, and see if Adobe does the same thing as what happened to the BC.

Anything specific I should do? I'll try to make it with both typed font and handwritten text like the BC.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 10:24 AM
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reply to post by AshleyD
 


good idea, if you have apple software maybe you could use the exact same software to convert it to pdf too. I believe it is free with osx.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 10:34 AM
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reply to post by AshleyD
 


You can also read about it on the web. MANY people have recreated the 'anomaly' by simply scanning and converting to a PDF. Here's a guy from the National Review that explains it, too.

OCR (optical character recognition) software tries to make documents more legible by 'filling in' to make the new document more recognizable.



All a scanner can do is create an image or a snapshot of the document that is nothing more than a collection of black and white or colour dots, known as a raster image. In order to extract and repurpose data from scanned documents, camera images or image-only PDFs, you need an OCR software that would single out letters on the image, put them into words and then - words into sentences, thus enabling you to access and edit the content of the original document.


This would explain the change in color, too.

I haven't looked into the pixel issue, but I may at some time.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 10:41 AM
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reply to post by ringing
 


It's not the "Actions" that are the problem. It's the "LAYERS"...



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 10:45 AM
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Originally posted by AshleyD
Anything specific I should do? I'll try to make it with both typed font and handwritten text like the BC.


I don't know what the software is, what scanner they used, etc. I'd read more about it and find the specifics before I confirmed anything.

Thing people don't realize is that this thing we're looking at on the internet is a png file of a scanned document, that originated as a computer printout from another computer file...

The Hawaii DOH, printed this out from a file, scanned it back into the computer, turned it into a PDF document file and placed that file on the Internet (or some similar set of steps). People who are poring over this PDF file aren't looking at the original document or a real piece of paper or even a real picture. And they're not document specialists even if this WERE a real document.

It's like me taking a picture of my dog with my camera, printing it out, scanning that picture back into the computer, changing the format of the file (to PDF) and then opening it in a viewing program. I'm no longer looking at my dog, or even a real picture of my dog. The electronic data has been manipulated by the interim software several times and it's hard to tell what I might see when I start breaking it down.


But my dog is the genuine article.

.
edit on 5/13/2011 by Benevolent Heretic because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 10:46 AM
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reply to post by Benevolent Heretic
 


Cool. I just made my document using a job application template form I found on the net. Then filled it out with both text font and handwriting in all different styles, including print and cursive, left/straight/right leaning, neat and messy, etc.

Will scan tonight and put into PDF to see what happens just to be sure.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 10:50 AM
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Originally posted by zaintdead
His birth certificate is made up of more than one pixel size.


I'm not seeing the different pixel sizes. Can someone elaborate?


This shouldn't happen even if a type writer is used,


What makes you think a typewriter was used?



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 11:16 AM
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Keep up the good work everyone. Love this thread and the analysis.

Just because we question it and try to seek the answers doesn't make us all "birthers".

anyways.. back to lurking



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 11:23 AM
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Wow have you ever heard of beating a dead horse?



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 11:48 AM
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OK, I just tried to replicate the anomalies contained in the BC but nothing like that is happening.

Here is a direct link to the test document I made:

files.abovetopsecret.com...

You can magnify it to enlarge it. Pardon my serial killer handwriting. lol That is the original document created from the following steps:

1). Find blank document (THIS is the one I used).
2). Type in some text so you get actual font.
3). Print. Write in some stuff with your own handwriting.

That would give us a document with a template, type, and handwriting.

4). Scan.

Then, to match the BC, you will need to convert it to PDF (which I did). Then open it in Adobe Illustrator (which I did).

Here is a screen shot of my results (with the layer feature opened):

files.abovetopsecret.com...

No layers (just one). No different colored font. No strange anomalies. No evidence of tampering.

Did I do something wrong? Is there some feature I am supposed to use to 'auto color' faint text?

Let me know and I will try it. At the current moment, I am not able to replicate the explanation they offer.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 11:56 AM
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Originally posted by AshleyD
Did I do something wrong?


That's why I said I would have to know what software and scanner they used to insure I used the same kind. Is your scanner color and did you use OCR software?



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 11:59 AM
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reply to post by AshleyD
 


Ashley, may I ask if your scanner has the option to save as PDF with these options?


That is where the OCR comes into play. My only problem with the OCR argument is that every document I test using it, the layers are always text layers and not images.

I also have a link to a different version of the LFBC,
MSNBC

This one has a plain white background and as stated on the page:

This handout image provided by the White House shows a copy of the long form of President Barack Obama's birth certificate from Hawaii.


I can't figure out where the white background version came from. It puzzles me that the white ghosting behind the text is explained because of the green background, yet there is a white background version floating around.
edit on 13-5-2011 by OneisOne because: Fix Link



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 12:01 PM
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reply to post by Benevolent Heretic
 


Not sure about OCR. Hubby popped in for lunch and scanned it for me while he was here but he is already gone.

I will be sure to ask him when he gets home. I'll see if he can make sure the scanner is 'cleaning up' the image with OCR and make sure he didn't do just a basic scan.

Please let me know if there is anything else you can think of. I'll keep everyone posted and will report with results.

I'm ASSUMING Fox's explanation is logical and true. It would be torn to bits if not. I thought the clean up was manual but if it is auto, I can still chalk that up to an honest clean up for legibility.

Just want to be sure.

ETA: One is one, will be sure to check that out. Thanks!

ETA II: And thanks for that white background version. Hadn't seen that before and didn't know it existed. Will look into that one.
edit on 5/13/2011 by AshleyD because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 12:08 PM
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reply to post by AshleyD
 


From the National Review article:



UPDATE: I’ve confirmed that scanning an image, converting it to a PDF, optimizing that PDF, and then opening it up in Illustrator, does in fact create layers similar to what is seen in the birth certificate PDF. You can try it yourself at home.
...
UPDATE II: For those of you who still aren’t convinced, here’s a one-page PDF that I just scanned and optimized, so you can see for yourself that an optimized PDF shows up in Illustrator as layers. (I didn’t spend hours getting the settings right.)


Ashley, did you optimize the PDF? Maybe you can call hubby and ask.






Anyone have any input on how I can see the different size pixels that this thread is about?
.


edit on 5/13/2011 by Benevolent Heretic because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 12:20 PM
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reply to post by Benevolent Heretic
 



Ashley, did you optimize the PDF?


I'm sure I didn't do that. Hubby only scanned it. Then it was up to me to convert it to PDF (done) and I am sure I never optimized it.

Looking how to do it now. Just found a step by step. Am downloading a program to do it. Then will repeat the steps in Illustrator to see if I replicated the BC anomalies.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 12:30 PM
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At about 1:50 in the above video, it shows how to optimize.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 01:20 PM
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reply to post by Benevolent Heretic
 


Here are the settings I did the first 2 times:

(Everything)
OCR: Yes
Rasterize: Yes
Compress: Yes
Web-optimize: Yes
Watermarked

(Only OCR)
OCR: Yes
Rasterize: No
Compress: No
Web-optimize: No
Watermarked

Then the man in your video said NOT to do OCR so I took that out:

(NOT OCR)
OCR: No
Rasterize: No
Compress: Yes
Web-optimize: Yes
Watermarked

No effects duplicating the BC anomalies with the first two. However, it DID appear with the third. I at least now duplicated the appearance of different colored text. Examples circled in red.

Screen shot in the PDF format with adobe reader:

files.abovetopsecret.com...

So that is part 1. Then I had to check it out in Adobe Illustrator.

And we have layers!
I did not add them or manually alter the image in any way. They appeared automatically in the program. I circled the layers in red:

files.abovetopsecret.com...

(ETA: Not only does this solve the question of different color fonts, I also see some are pixelated and some are not so that answers another question).

So I am convinced of the explanation. It always helps to investigate things with our own eyes. Now we have an ATS reference instead of having to take some websites word for it. I will link to this thread if the subject comes up in the future.

Anyone who wants to duplicate the process, here is exactly what I did:

1) Create a document:
a. Find a blank form online.
b. Add typed text to some fields.
c. Print.
d. Add handwriting to some fields.

2) Scan document.
a. No special optimization needed. A straight up scan still yielded results.
b. It will be something like a jpeg on your computer (that is what it was for me).

3) Convert to PDF.
a. Illustrator won't open a regular image so it must be PDF.
b. I used a free online tool and a down loadable tool.

4). Optimize PDF.
a. Ignore the OCR
b. Just optimize and compress.

You should see something similar to the screen shots I posted above.

P.S. This was a ton of work that took me hours to do and helps put matters to rest. I demand tons of stars.

edit on 5/13/2011 by AshleyD because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 01:56 PM
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Excellent work, Ashley! This is the epitome of what a Conspiracy Theorist should do, IMO. I'm all a-tingle.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 01:56 PM
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And here it is all summed up in one image. This pretty much clarifies all the questions I had. Maybe it will help someone else and answer their suspicions, too:



1). We see the darker vs. lighter text. Check.
2). We see the pixelated vs. non pixelated text. Check.
3). We see layers put in automatically from an originally flat image. Check.

So the debate is settled in my mind for now.




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