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Oldest written recipe in the world..........and its for beer!!!

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posted on May, 13 2011 @ 04:49 AM
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When archaeologists discovered a four-thousand-year old Mesopotamian clay tablet, they were naturally curious to learn what it was all about. So a good deal of scholarly effort was put into the task of deciphering its cryptic markings.

As it turns out, the ancient Mesopotamians were recording a recipe for beer. And not just any recipe, but a formula handed down from the god Enki himself.



Link to full article.

It makes sense that beer would have some ancient history. Many cultures used beer as a means of reaching and "enlightened" state or a trance like mindset. Usually it was a person of great importance in these tribes or societies that would consume this beer and then deliver the message to the rest, saying it was from their god.

Pity though the recipe is not available, cause i would have liked to try it.

VVV




posted on May, 13 2011 @ 04:52 AM
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reply to post by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep
 


Obviously in more civilised times Beer was tax deductible hence the receipt



edit on 13-5-2011 by spacedonk because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 04:54 AM
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reply to post by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep
 


As you said "to reach an enlightened state" - Maybe it was a very good beer, a very good formula that could have given is higher brain function temporarily!
- Would explain why it hasn't been released just yet XD

Jamie.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 04:57 AM
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Beer from a god...

How do I sign up for this religion?

Selling my soul isn't a problem either. I've already given it to at least three other deities.

What is Enki's policy on multi-claim followers?



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 04:58 AM
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reply to post by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep
 


Actually it's not quite that romantic. Beer was drunk because there was no safe drinking water, and beer was the only alternative to bad water.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 05:02 AM
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reply to post by ANOK
 


Hey, if i had to drink beer instead of water, bring it on!!

Enki, sure did his people a big favour!!

lol

VVV



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 05:30 AM
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Originally posted by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep

Pity though the recipe is not available, cause i would have liked to try it.


It would be no different than a beer today. What you want is the yeast of a beer from that ear - then you get the taste. Recipes only really work for food in this respect - for beer, it's the ingredients. You still get a new beer from different things, and age will make a diffference, but cases like this, you want the yeast culture - thats the thing that will say this beer is not 100 years old.

I recall they found 200 year old beers a while ago, and they still have the yeast so they were going to make new beer from it.

Never heard anything else tho... Oo



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 05:32 AM
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Originally posted by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep
reply to post by ANOK
 


Hey, if i had to drink beer instead of water, bring it on!!

Enki, sure did his people a big favour!!

lol

VVV


My mate does that, and his gout is horrendous.

or are you still 20? you'd get away with it for 20 years at least



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 05:35 AM
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Originally posted by ANOK
reply to post by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep
 


Actually it's not quite that romantic. Beer was drunk because there was no safe drinking water, and beer was the only alternative to bad water.


They say the same about quinine and tonic water, but only since they never found a synthetic quinine, we're stuck with it
Beer was just pure "Man that's a nice foul water, I'll have more in a bit... *hic* screw the mozzies.."..


edit on 13/5/2011 by badw0lf because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 06:56 AM
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reply to post by badw0lf
 


Well your close but not quite there... Way back then no yeast was added to the beer by the brew-master. The airborn yeast cultures were introduced to the beer via the air currents. Certain breweries in Belgium still do it that way.

So your theory that getting the proper yeast strain for that year would be next to impossible as the fermentation used many different strains that happen to be in those particular air currents for those particular days.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 07:19 AM
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I have a yeast culture that I have been using for the last three years in brewing my Weitber and Lagers. For my stouts, I just use packet yeast. For the darker beers, it’s more about the wurt than the yeast when it comes to flavor and body. It is the lighter beers such as pilsners that get most of the flavor from the yeast and hops.

I made a batch of Chocolate Carmel oatmeal stout back during the winter and it was delicious! I also still have a pilsner and a weitber that has been fermenting for months. I bottled five gallons of each about a month ago but I still have 5 gallons of each fermenting. I’m debating on whether to go on and bottle this weekend or give it a few more weeks. The gravity is already ludicrously high lol!



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 10:28 AM
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reply to post by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep
 


Beer was also a main source of nutrients. Like .. an alcoholic soup..

If the ancients knew we ingested the likes of Budweiser, Coors, Miller, or the repulsive "64 cal" beers (yellow piss flavored water) I believe they would be highly disgusted.

Edit: no .. the beer would not be the same today. We have old beer recipes going back thousands of years (now 4k years!) and can reproduce them. Beer used to be "thicker" and it fermented shorter, so the alch content was about half what we drink today (it was usually around 2%) but much higher in nutrients. What we drink today as main stream beer is nothing like what it was. Even old beers, like Guinness, have changed quite a bit.
edit on 5/13/2011 by Rockpuck because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 11:02 AM
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Originally posted by badw0lf

Originally posted by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep

Pity though the recipe is not available, cause i would have liked to try it.


It would be no different than a beer today. What you want is the yeast of a beer from that ear - then you get the taste. Recipes only really work for food in this respect - for beer, it's the ingredients. You still get a new beer from different things, and age will make a diffference, but cases like this, you want the yeast culture - thats the thing that will say this beer is not 100 years old.

I recall they found 200 year old beers a while ago, and they still have the yeast so they were going to make new beer from it.

Never heard anything else tho... Oo



Most beer today is brewed using the same domesticated yeast, commonly called Brewer's Yeast...

en.wikipedia.org...

...it is the same yeast that is used in the baking industry too. The wine producers still, generally, use native wild yeasts that are specific to their grapes, but most homebrewers use the domesticated form. The yeast used by the Sumerians would have depended entirely on what they used in the beer, that is where the yeast would have been, they didn't domesticate yeast until Egypt became the centre of beer production, though they probably would have had 'yeast plants'. Up until the industrialisation of the baking and brewing industries producers would have their own unique yeast plant which provided a distinct brew, and this is becoming popular again. Similarly I have been looking to buy a 'Ginger Beer yeast plant', they started using brewer's yeast in production in the 1950s so the 'natural' yeast went out of use, and is nearly extinct after having been passed on from generation to generation for hundreds of years.

Very interesting topic, yeast



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 11:03 AM
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Hail to the ale!!!!!!



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 11:51 AM
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Beer wasnt only drunk because of lack of clean drinking water. The egyptians and other nations made tonnes of it for the slaves because it contained calories so acted as food source, and keeping slaves in a constant state of intoxication made them less likely to uprise.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 07:20 PM
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Originally posted by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep
reply to post by ANOK
 


Hey, if i had to drink beer instead of water, bring it on!!

Enki, sure did his people a big favour!!


It's probably one of the reasons people only lived till they were 30 or so.

Die from dysentery, or slow alcohol poisoning.

Tea in the UK, and in Italy coffee, replaced beer eventually, in the 16th century, boiled water and all that. In the US though coffee didn't take over from beer until well into the 19th century. I guess tea lost it's appeal after 1773, what with all that sea salt after-taste lol.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 11:43 AM
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reply to post by DerbyCityLights
 


We have a cream ale fermenting as I write. Should be ready in a week and a half or so.
Still have a half keg (5 gal. Cornelius keg) of ESB in my kegerator fridge and 20 gallons left in my brew-partners basement. we do a mix of beer styles so sometimes we re-use the yeast, sometime we use wet cultures, and sometimes dry, all based on the recipes we brew.

PS: Are you an all-grain or extract brewer?
edit on 16-5-2011 by palg1 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 12:41 PM
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reply to post by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep
 


Makes perfect sense.
To quote Benjamin Franklin: "Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.”



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 11:02 PM
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i know why beer was made available to the ancients....

When the 'gods' decended from the heavens, the gods made certain that the slaves were drunk.
Who would believe a 4000yo story from a drunkard ?????
lol



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