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Excerpts From One of the Books in Tuscon, AZ "Ethnic Studies" Class

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posted on May, 13 2011 @ 08:03 AM
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Suddenly, that Arizona bill against ethnic studies looks like a right thing to do...

www.abovetopsecret.com...




posted on May, 13 2011 @ 08:17 AM
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Hmmmm...a thread trying to dignify the blatant racism in Arizona. Funny how no one in this thread has actually verified these supposed quotes ...you seem to all just take it as fact. Carry on...sorry to interrupt a kKan meeting..



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 08:23 AM
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I have to agree with basically everyone who has replied so far but I do have to ask one very compelling question which, I do know the answer to, but would like to point out the hypocrisy.

If this was reversed and it was a Caucasian cultures study which said the exact same thing (just fixed to fit the culture of course) would there be as little reporting about the story as this, or would there be a national uproar?



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 08:26 AM
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I teach for a living. I have never seen anything like that in any culture studies in the middle or high school levels. Its inappropriate and would open the district for liability in lawsuits.

I gotta call shill on this - no district can or would open themselves up to the liability involved in teaching that material.

In college - maybe. even then, it would be presented as a single viewpoint, and that is NOT the standard view of most Mexicans, but a small rabid few.

I think this person is shilling unless she can give provenance that that is approved teaching materials.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 08:27 AM
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This is happening in Arizona, correct? If the people there "should just go back to where they came from" if they don't like it, where would they go exactly? Who was in Arizona before the white man?

I would love to see the books used in rural-white regions. Probably all sorts of references to spooks, spics and Dale Earnhardt



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 09:55 AM
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reply to post by TXRabbit
 


Please go find them and share with the rest of us, that would give some backing to your absurd statements.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 10:00 AM
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Lot of people foaming at the mouth on here without any context or details.

I would simply like to know what book the quotes are from, and what the context of the "class" would be. Are we talking about a section that deals with prejudice--perhaps looking at readings that express racism and prejudice.

I would be more inclined to believe that the content quoted from that book would be more of an "awareness type" study on racism/prejudice in other cultures. Something like that......Knowing when and why the material is covered in the class would be helpful. I hope that makes sense.

It would be unwise to only teach the nice things about other cultures (including your own).


edit on 5/13/2011 by yadda333 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 10:00 AM
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Originally posted by Wolf321
This infuriates me.

The scary part is, I would bet that these are the common themes and beliefs being perpetuated in the homes of many Latinos. These ideas didn't just come into the classes out of thin air.

The point of no return for Americas demise has come and gone, but this is a prime example of how we got here and why it is getting worse.
edit on 12-5-2011 by Wolf321 because: (no reason given)


I would just like to jump in for a second and say that no, this is not in fact what goes on in Latino homes. I am Puerto Rican ( granted I am automatically an American citizen by birth) However, I can assure you that we are not plotting to take away land that was so obviously hard won. I feel slightly offended that you would blanket all Latinos when then is a minority view. Much like the view that everyone not of the Caucasian race should go back to where they came from ( rofl)

As for assimilating, I don't know where you are from exactly, but around here everyone gets along with everyone. We retain our old culture, but we can branch out into society. Maybe you should hang around more positive people than the gang members you must have had a run in with. Also, the whole dey tuk ur jobs is getting really old. Especially since I hardly think you were washing dishes or picking fruit from fields.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 10:20 AM
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I really think that posting about this thread being a Klan meeting is a strawman argument, and a weak one at that.
I am a historian. History is impartial. This is not impartial material. It's been pointed out which books these quotes came from. Anyone claiming to educate, while using words like "gringo" is an insult to any academic worth their salt.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 11:16 AM
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This is sad, and only shows the racist problem in the US is from the non-whites, and shows most racists are non-white. It also shows how the far left Socialist/Communist are racist intentioned.

This is like if a White Culture Class was started using the books of George Lincoln Rockwell. And his books are more truthfull.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 11:30 AM
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Originally posted by yadda333
I would be more inclined to believe that the content quoted from that book would be more of an "awareness type" study on racism/prejudice in other cultures. Something like that......Knowing when and why the material is covered in the class would be helpful. I hope that makes sense.


Yes - I agree. Something is missing in this story.

Those that are outraged by this - - - are you also outraged with Texas and their slanted history books?



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 11:51 AM
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Wait, what?

This is a cultural studies class, wherein the study of one of the numerous cultures we've robbed, subjugated and/or destroyed is conducted from the point of view of the people that constitute that culture, so their literature is studied to expand the perspective of the student. No, it's not pretty. The world is a mean and ugly place. To hide this fact from our children is to do them a grave disservice, because they'll learn one day, one way or another. The longer it takes them, the more it'll hurt when they do. Hiding our own misdeeds from the past from them is just as bad.How can we expect them to learn from our mistakes then? The terrible treatment we have given and continue to give the Mexicans has shaped and continues to shape their culture. To have a cultural studies class without covering it would be farcical.
In the case of the Mexicans, we killed their sons in the process of taking their capital city and forced them at gunpoint to sell us half their empire. Now, we oh-so-graciously allow their grandchildren to cross the border to the land that once would have been theirs to inherit to do our grunt labor and dirty work at pay rates we would consider criminal if we were on the receiving end, and live among us as a marginalized minority that we write laws to discriminate against TO THIS VERY DAY. Marijuana was first criminalized because it was cheap, abundant and easy to cultivate and thus a favorite recreational substance of the marginalized minorities that used it because they spent what little money they earned growing the white man's food and clearing his refuse trying to survive. Authorities needed a way to be able to jail an uppity minority, should the need arise. What better way than to criminalize what he's likely to have in his pocket?
Sailors stationed in California during world war two saw Mexican youths out and about with white girls and having a good time! What an atrocity! So incensed by the transgression, the sailors ran amok in gangs accompanied by police officers that did nothing to intervene for something like three days and violently beat and stripped any minority seen wearing a zoot suit, which was common dress for young men in the Mexican-American subculture. As a result, the practice of wearing a zoot suit was outlawed in Los Angeles, which, at the time at least, harbored the largest population of Mexicans outside of Mexico.
Even now, in Arizona, by law police officers can pull someone over just for being brown and demand their identification papers.
And they're the racist ones?
I think not.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 11:54 AM
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Originally posted by tom502
This is sad, and only shows the racist problem in the US is from the non-whites, and shows most racists are non-white. It also shows how the far left Socialist/Communist are racist intentioned.

This is like if a White Culture Class was started using the books of George Lincoln Rockwell. And his books are more truthfull.


So you have deduced that most racists are non-white from this thread--what is contained in this thread has helped you to make this sweeping generalization.

These are knee jerk, emotional reactions.

Maybe I'm being too level headed, but I just cannot imagine a school administration allowing a class that is purely for condoning racism against "white" people.

I think we're missing a lot of information about this.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 12:26 PM
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Originally posted by Annee

Originally posted by yadda333
I would be more inclined to believe that the content quoted from that book would be more of an "awareness type" study on racism/prejudice in other cultures. Something like that......Knowing when and why the material is covered in the class would be helpful. I hope that makes sense.


Yes - I agree. Something is missing in this story.

Those that are outraged by this - - - are you also outraged with Texas and their slanted history books?


Yes.
And I would hope that anyone would be.
It's not a matter of which race or ethnic group is using material like this. It's an outrage that any high school class would consider this scholarly material.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 12:39 PM
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I searched around for some kind of proof that the ethnic studies in Tuscon were in fact racist against whites.
I have the full finding of the superintendant if anyone is interested.
Below are a couple of paragraphs of the finding. I broke them up to make them easier to seperate.

#FINDING BY THE STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
OF VIOLATION BY TUCSON UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
PURSUANT TO A.R.S. § 15-112(B)



I. Philosophy of the Applicable Statute.

I make the findings contained in this document as the Arizona Superintendent of Public Instruction. I also was the author of the first draft of the applicable statute, A.R.S. § 15-112(A). It was amended somewhat in the legislature. The following is the philosophy which underlay the statute:
People are individuals, not exemplars of racial groups. What is important about people is what they know, what they can do, their ability to appreciate beauty, their character, and not what race into which they are born. They are entitled to be treated that way. It is fundamentally wrong to divide students up according to their racial group, and teach them separately.
_________________________________

For example, Augustine Romero was the Chairman of the Ethnic Studies
Department at TUSD for many years, and is still involved. In a debate against the undersigned on CNN, he was asked the following question and gave the following answer:

Q [by the reporter]: And, Mr. Romero, I want to begin with you. Why not just call the class Mexican studies or – like you would have – Mexican-American studies? Why did you put the word la raza in there, which as you know, too many people connotes a political movement, as opposed to an educational course?

ROMERO: …so that our students could recognize and connect to their indigenous side, just like the word “dine” for the Navajo translates to ‘the people,’ like the word ‘o’odham’ for the Tohono O’odham translates to ‘the people.’ The word ‘yoeme’ for the Yoeme people translates to ‘the people.’

It was an attempt to connect to our indigenous sides, as well as our Mexican side. (Emphasis added.)

If one of the purposes of this course is “an attempt to connect with our indigenous sides, as well as out Mexican side,” then obviously the course is designed primarily for pupils of a particular ethnic group.”
____________________________

Furthermore, the page of the District’s website describing the program states that the components of the model under which the program was developed is specifically designed for Hispanic students: “For Latino students, each of [the model’s] components creates both a Latino academic identity and an enhanced level of academic proficiency. The end result is an elevated state of Latino academic achievement.” And, “The Mexican American Studies Department has found that its curriculum, because of its inclusiveness and its critical nature, offers Latino students the opportunity to engage in a learning process which transcends the depth of any previous experience.” Finally, the page includes a graphic indicating that the purpose of the Mexican American Studies Model is “Increased Academic Achievement for Latino Students,” “Academic Proficiency for Latino Students,” and “Academic Identify for Latino Students.” The District’s official description on its website leaves no room for doubt that the Mexican American Studies program is “designed primarily” for Hispanic students.
_____________________________

There were about 4 Teachers whose testimony was heard. Here are a couple of the shorter testimonies.
Teacher Number 2


Teacher Number 2 wrote as follows:

I heard him [an ethnic studies teacher] tell his students that the U of A is a racist organization because only 12% of students are Latino and they do not support the Latin students there. I heard him tell students that they need to go to college so they can gain the power to take back the stolen land and give it back to Mexico. He personally told me that he teaches his students that republicans hate Latinos and he has the legislation to prove it. When I asked him about Mexican American Republicans who are against illegal immigration, he said this is an example of ‘self-racism.’

Teacher Number 3

Teacher Number 3 wrote as follows:

I have, during the last two years, been attacked repeatedly here at Tucson High by members of the Ethnic Studies department because I question the substance and veracity of their American History and Social Justice Government classes. I have been called racist by fellow Tucson High teachers, members of the Ethnic Studies department, and students enrolled in the departments’ classes. These charges come simply because I ask the department to provide the primary source material for the perspective they preach. The teachers of these classes not only refuse to stop the name-calling but openly encourage the students’ behavior.
_____________________________

Some exerpts from text books used in the class...

Another textbook is the Mexican American Heritage (2nd ed.).

One of the chapters is “The Loss of Aztlan.” Aztlan refers to the states taken from Mexico in 1848: Arizona, California, New Mexico and Colorado. This chapter states: “Apparently the U.S. is having as little success in keeping the Mexicans out of Aztlan as Mexico had when they tried to keep the North Americans out of Texas in 1830.” (P. 107.) In other words, books paid for by American taxpayers used in American public schools are gloating over the difficulty we are having in controlling the border. This page goes on to state: “…the Latinos are now realizing that the power to control Aztlan may once again be in their hands.”
______________________________
Some feel this oppression no longer exists Well here’s something they missed – Self D means self determination…Stranger in your own land under exploitation…This is the state of the indigena today…WE DIDN’T CROSS THE BORDERS, THE BORDERS CROSSED US! YET THE SETTLER NATION LIVES IN DISGUST! The American dream only for some WASP – White Anglo Saxon Protestant…the frame of mind that keeps our oppression constant…Cihuatl is reclaiming…We have returned to Aztlan!!! We have returned to Aztlan!!!
_________________________________

The materials for this class include “A Field Guide for Achieving Equity in School.” These materials include: “We often hear people referred to as being privileged, which usually is a comment pertaining to the individual’s financial or economic status…In Courageous Conversation, however, privilege takes on a different meaning: it refers to the amount of melanin in a person’s skin, hair, and eyes. (This is followed by a table which promulgates racial stereotypes by detailing the differences between “white individualism” “colored group collectivism.”) “White people tend to dominate the conversation by setting the tone for how everyone must talk and which words should be used. All of these “White ways” must be recognized, internalized, and then silently acted on by people of color”. (This is an example, referring to the statute, of subsection 2, “promote resentment toward a race or class of people”)…The aforementioned White cultural characteristics, such as individualism, blur into the consciousness of Whiteness, which becomes not only a way of behaving but also a way of thinking….White people depend on the overwhelming presence of other White people in positions of power and influence to maintain a system of racial advantage. At the same time, many White educators believe that gains in school, as in their own lives, come from individual effort and accomplishment.”



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 12:42 PM
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Originally posted by CodyOutlaw

Originally posted by Annee

Originally posted by yadda333
I would be more inclined to believe that the content quoted from that book would be more of an "awareness type" study on racism/prejudice in other cultures. Something like that......Knowing when and why the material is covered in the class would be helpful. I hope that makes sense.


Yes - I agree. Something is missing in this story.

Those that are outraged by this - - - are you also outraged with Texas and their slanted history books?


Yes.
And I would hope that anyone would be.
It's not a matter of which race or ethnic group is using material like this. It's an outrage that any high school class would consider this scholarly material.


I don't have sound right now, so I'm not sure if the title of the book is mentioned--I would like to see a full text.

Offensive material should be covered in the right context. A lot of people have found 'Huck Fin' to be offensive, even moving to alter the text. Is that appropriate? I remember a big thread on here about it, and I also remember what the majority opinion was.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 12:51 PM
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Originally posted by yadda333
Lot of people foaming at the mouth on here without any context or details.

I would simply like to know what book the quotes are from, and what the context of the "class" would be. Are we talking about a section that deals with prejudice--perhaps looking at readings that express racism and prejudice.

I would be more inclined to believe that the content quoted from that book would be more of an "awareness type" study on racism/prejudice in other cultures. Something like that......Knowing when and why the material is covered in the class would be helpful. I hope that makes sense.

It would be unwise to only teach the nice things about other cultures (including your own).


edit on 5/13/2011 by yadda333 because: (no reason given)


The title of the book is "Pedagogy of the Oppressed" by the Brazilian author Paulo Freire. It's not a textbook, and the odds that it's actually used in third grade are slim to nil. What it's used for is to give an example of the situation from the point of view of someone on the "losing side" of the ethnic "culture wars."

It's sort of like how "Catcher in the Rye" used to be used in literature classes to teach students about points of view other than their own.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 12:52 PM
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More liberal, self-hating, white guilt no doubt.
Just replace the word "gringo" with "latino" & see what happens then!



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 12:56 PM
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Originally posted by TheWalkingFox

Originally posted by yadda333
Lot of people foaming at the mouth on here without any context or details.

I would simply like to know what book the quotes are from, and what the context of the "class" would be. Are we talking about a section that deals with prejudice--perhaps looking at readings that express racism and prejudice.

I would be more inclined to believe that the content quoted from that book would be more of an "awareness type" study on racism/prejudice in other cultures. Something like that......Knowing when and why the material is covered in the class would be helpful. I hope that makes sense.

It would be unwise to only teach the nice things about other cultures (including your own).


edit on 5/13/2011 by yadda333 because: (no reason given)


The title of the book is "Pedagogy of the Oppressed" by the Brazilian author Paulo Freire. It's not a textbook, and the odds that it's actually used in third grade are slim to nil. What it's used for is to give an example of the situation from the point of view of someone on the "losing side" of the ethnic "culture wars."

It's sort of like how "Catcher in the Rye" used to be used in literature classes to teach students about points of view other than their own.


And there you have it.



posted on May, 13 2011 @ 02:09 PM
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reply to post by yadda333
 


But there we have differing circumstances.
Literature is a different can of worms than history.
History should be taught in a purely unbiased and fact-based way.
Literature is about emotion and art.

"Gringo" or "Nigger" in the context of a study in literature is a question of what should be considered art.
"Gringo" or "Nigger" in the context of a scholarly approach to teaching history is a case of terrible teaching.

If we are to think of this class as a study in cultural views, then we must also accept studies in white supremacist texts as well. And Asian supremacy etc.

You might as well get lectures from Louis Farrakhan and Tom Metzger, too.

And no, I wouldn't consider texts written by either of those two as academically viable in terms of teaching history.

Tell me this is not considered a history class, and I will drop my point.
However, you will end up with more classes - a class dealing with Metzger, Farrakhan and their ilk, too.
This doesn't belong in an academic setting.



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