It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

NASA Plans Test of New Moon Lander Morpheus !!

page: 1
3

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 12 2011 @ 12:31 PM
link   

squat, insectlike contraption is set to fly untethered for the first time soon in a NASA test of technologies designed to take humans to the moon, Mars or beyond.



NASA's Morpheus prototype lander rests on its launch pad waiting for a test at Johnson Space Center in Houston.

The unmanned Morpheus lander, named after the Greek god of dreams, was built at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston using cutting-edge technologies that the agency hopes will one day enable manned missions to another planet or even an asteroid. The vehicle, about the size of an SUV, could carry about 1,100 pounds (500 kg) of cargo to the moon.

Not only are the technologies onboard innovative, but NASA's process of building the lander is, too. "Part of what this project set out to do was to question the way we've done things," Project Morpheus manager Matt Ondler told SPACE.com. "We purposefully set out to see if we could do things faster and cheaper, leveraging off the work that was already done."

Cutting-edge tech

One of the primary technologies being tested on the lander is a system intended to spot dangerous craters or boulders that could make a landing spot on another planet unsafe. The so-called Automated Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology — or ALHAT — uses lasers to image the surface of a body and identify hazards as it flies over.

Another innovation being tested on Morpheus is a lighter, safer mix of fuel. The landing machine is powered by liquid oxygen and methane, which NASA says is a safer alternative to traditional spacecraft propellants. Not only that, but it's 10 to 20 times less expensive and weighs significantly less — an important distinction when every pound of weight carried into space requires an additional 15 pounds of fuel to get it there.

Tethered tests

Morpheus has already undergone several tests while tethered to a crane so it doesn't get out of control. But these haven't always gone quite as planned. One test on April 27, for example, had to be aborted after the lander started swinging wildly. In NASA parlance, "shortly after ignition the vehicle pitched over and control authority was lost," according to a NASA Morpheus blog.


Source: www.foxnews.com...

Looks pretty darn cool. I sure hope this works. I don't want to waste anymore time than needed to get our Butts back to the moon---before every other country gets there.

Well, so many conflicting stories come from NASA, especially when they have to be paid for.

Whatever it is, lets strive to keep NASA up and running and demand that it gets $$$ to advance and become the SOLE Top No. 1 Space Agency.

Any ATSer have detailed info on this project/lander etc.?

edit on 5/12/2011 by anon72 because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 12 2011 @ 12:35 PM
link   
reply to post by anon72
 



Morpheus has already undergone several tests while tethered to a crane so it doesn't get out of control. But these haven't always gone quite as planned. One test on April 27, for example, had to be aborted after the lander started swinging wildly. In NASA parlance, "shortly after ignition the vehicle pitched over and control authority was lost," according to a NASA Morpheus blog.


Advanced???


No Apollo mission had that problem 40 years ago and the LM had less computing power than my mobile phone..



posted on May, 12 2011 @ 12:41 PM
link   
Well without the Trinity boosters to get it up there and the Neo living pod.....

Can we really trust Agent Smith at mission control?



posted on May, 12 2011 @ 12:42 PM
link   

-does NOT approve


Seriously...looks like some high school science project.



posted on May, 12 2011 @ 12:46 PM
link   
This thing is a joke, in all honesty. The future of the human race is in space, and I will be glad when NASA is given a real budget so that we can get on with achieving that future.



posted on May, 12 2011 @ 12:47 PM
link   
Dolly Pardon called, she want's her bra back!



posted on May, 12 2011 @ 12:48 PM
link   
What the hell is that? Two patriotic breast implants on an aluminum frame??? I wonder if it went out of control on the april 27th test cause it was using iOS



posted on May, 12 2011 @ 12:49 PM
link   
What they need are 4 thrusters firing around a sphere, then have it osillate around in a circle for stability. Direction by 4 more stationary thrusters occasionally coming on for course correction.

The steriotypical flying saucer shape would be the most logical shape for this to be accomplished..but with a "nipple" top for aerodynamics.


(for conceptual reference...ignore the pseudo-science)



posted on May, 12 2011 @ 01:03 PM
link   
This is the first time I have seen it and to be honest, it is somewhat disappointing. It doesn't really look like 42 years of improvement.

IRM



posted on May, 12 2011 @ 01:09 PM
link   
Rough Crowd today....

What do you expect. What has advanced in the last few decades is our understanding of Space and the requirements to move in it etc.

The whole weight issue and the unmanned aspect of this allowed them to utilze various/different materials-all set on the reaching the established goal.

I think it is as cool as hell.

Maybe so odd looking, it will scare the Aliens up there and maybe we'll get the upper hand on them?



posted on May, 12 2011 @ 01:30 PM
link   

Originally posted by anon72
I think it is as cool as hell.


Cool?
It looks like metal brussel sprouts and doesn't work at all.

how is that cool?

How many billions are we shoving to nasa to get this? man, your easy to please

would you spend 3 million dollars on a bycicle that doesn't work? if so, then nasa may have an opening for you.



posted on May, 12 2011 @ 01:38 PM
link   
reply to post by SaturnFX
 


Go rain on someone else parade. Sounds like you have a case of the Mondays.....

Yes, I think it's cool. Slay me.

What I think is cool that someone is actually trying to do something, instead of critizing it on a website....



posted on May, 12 2011 @ 03:15 PM
link   

Originally posted by backinblack
Advanced???


No Apollo mission had that problem 40 years ago and the LM had less computing power than my mobile phone..


Shows the extent of your knowledge of the lunar lander testing program.







It's a new design and obviously they haven't done this in over 39+ years.
So cut them some slack.



edit on 12-5-2011 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 12 2011 @ 05:43 PM
link   
Safely and controllably landing men, was Russia's greatest obstacle in the 60's space race, which is why they invested so much in robotic rovers, that basically landed surrounded by bouncing balls, (like you see in Mars missions and Sci Fi). The problems on earth magnify the stability that would be exponentially less on the moon and even Mars.

Not a popular thing to point out to the disbeliever crowd, but after Russia launched the first basketball sized orbital satellite in 1959, their following 'First's in Space' were largely cosmetic and media hyped with the same tech just bigger. NASA has really took hold of all of the functional 'First's in Space' since that Kennedy speech in 1961, and continue to do so.



posted on May, 12 2011 @ 05:48 PM
link   
You have to understand the difference between prototype, and operational platforms. You simply don't test full scale prototypes right off the bat, the first Stealth Fighter was 1/3rd size, then operational prototypes at 60% scale, 'Have Blue', look it up.



posted on May, 12 2011 @ 09:19 PM
link   
reply to post by Illustronic
 


You just earn a well deserved Star. Flag if I could.

That explains all of that.



posted on May, 12 2011 @ 09:27 PM
link   
They had the right idea with the inflatable ball lander a la' mars. I mean, its unmanned, so a little tumbling action wouldn't be bad.



posted on May, 12 2011 @ 11:33 PM
link   
I would prefer this lander:


Note the absence of ground-incinerating flames beneath it.

It also functions as an ascent vehicle.

Works for: Moon, Asteroids, Mars, Earth, etc.

And it's more reflective of 42 years of technological progress.



edit on 5/13/2011 by Larryman because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
3

log in

join