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Revised 'Net censorship bill requires search engines to block sites, too

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posted on May, 11 2011 @ 03:34 PM
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Revised 'Net censorship bill requires search engines to block sites, too


arstechnica.com< br />

Surprise! After months in the oven, the soon-to-be-released new version of a major US Internet censorship bill didn't shrink in scope—it got much broader. Under the new proposal, search engines, Internet providers, credit card companies, and ad networks would all have cut off access to foreign "rogue sites"—and such court orders would not be limited to the government. Private rightsholders could go to court and target foreign domains, too.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on May, 11 2011 @ 03:34 PM
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Well, the "governance as information control" model continues to fester in the sewage pit that is the suspicion-ridden minds of our political leaders.


The bill is an attempt to deal with foreign sites which can be difficult for US enforcement to reach, even when those sites explicitly target US citizens.

The PROTECT IP Act makes a few major changes to last year's COICA legislation. First, it does provide a more limited definition of sites “dedicated to infringing activities.” The previous definition was criticized as being unworkably vague, and it could have put many legitimate sites at risk.

But what the PROTECT IP Act gives with one hand, it takes away with the other. While the definition of targeted sites is tighter, the remedies against such sites get broader. COICA would have forced credit card companies like MasterCard and Visa to stop doing business with targeted sites, and it would have prevented ad networks from working with such sites. It also suggested a system of DNS blocking to make site nominally more difficult to access.

The PROTECT IP Act adds one more entity to this list: search engines.


Evidently, there can never be enough legislation to solidify the government's role as mega-corporation's strong-arm thugs. And nearly every legislator is only too happy to oblige since the media industry is the key to their success in any political career.


The emphasis here is on forcing intermediaries to get involved in policing such sites. Rightsholders have had difficulty suing the millions of end users engaged in infringement, and they have had difficulty suing the sites themselves when they are based abroad. But MasterCard and Google? Those are easy, US-based targets who will comply will any law Congress passes.

The PROTECT IP Act goes even further than forcing these intermediaries to take action after a court order; it actively encourages them to take unilateral action without any sort of court order at all. The bill summary makes clear that ad networks and payment processors will be protected if they “voluntarily cease doing business with infringing websites, outside of any court ordered action.” If a search engine decides that the next YouTube is a copyright infringer—and rightsholders have often sued sites like Veoh and YouTube in the past—it can simply cut off advertising for that reason and be immunized under the law. So can Visa.


arstechnica.com< br /> (visit the link for the full news article)



posted on May, 11 2011 @ 03:46 PM
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its only a matter of time before the governments start fully censoring our web. Especially with the twitter scandal over here in the UK with the super injuntions. Aint seen nothing on ats yet, But your all bound to of heard about it. Basically one law for the web, and another for reality



posted on May, 11 2011 @ 03:52 PM
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I've often felt the world really needs a new internet. Designed from the ground up to be completely anonymous.
Unlike what we have now which is mostly like sending postcards. And for the most part, completely trackable by governments.
There are a few internet add-on hacks like TOR or Freenet, but they're never going to be internet replacements due to the very slow speeds and high bandwidth they use up.



posted on May, 11 2011 @ 04:07 PM
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GREAT! Welcome to China's version of the Internet. And I can betcha sites like WikiLeaks and ah hell even our beloved ATS will most likely get blocked eventually.



posted on May, 11 2011 @ 04:16 PM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 


So basically they want us to live under Chinese rules? This is not what the internet was about. It's about freedom of information. Information has never hurt nobody ever. The bill will not be used to protect children, or the population. It will be used to police everyone on an intellectual level. Who are they to decide what I can and cannot know about.



posted on May, 11 2011 @ 04:39 PM
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I would bet on a peer to peer DNS soon. Just like the drug war, for every action there is a reaction.



posted on May, 11 2011 @ 04:57 PM
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I think the major search engines have already delisted some sites.
I've gone looking for some that used to be there and plenty in that certain catagory, but they're not there now.



posted on May, 11 2011 @ 05:13 PM
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This article is a bit dated now, but some background info for those who may not be up to speed on the moving along of the goalposts...


Book Burning in the Digital Age... and so it begins

The battle of the copyright is a long and sordid tale on the internet. Most folks are familiar with the old days of Napster, and the record companies suing the pants off of soccer-Moms because their kids had downloaded songs to the family computer. More recently as technology has continued to advance, we have seen movie companies also come into the fold along with the music companies, often suing to shut down websites that host torrent files of copyrighted material, as well as still going after the individual on occasion. At the end of the day though, most folks aren't overly concerned about those issues. Music and movies are creative expressions and public past-times for the most part, not exactly a priority in this day and age. It all sounds like a lot of hair-splitting over profits that no one really wants to be bothered with. Sure artists are entitled to make money from their work. But at the same time, when someone shells out $20 for a CD that has one good song on it, it's clearly a rip-off scheme by the recording industry too. A big ball of frustration and argument that is best left to the folks who have a vested interest in the fight. The whole debate has just soured many people to listening to music or watching movies at all. Easier just to flip on the radio or the TV and be done with it. Music and movies just aren't much fun as a hobby anymore, which is probably a bigger reason for any perceived loss of revenue for these big companies than anything else. Some folks have just decided to grow up faster than we would have liked to, wistfully leaving pop-culture behind to focus on more important issues. Like freedom of speech, perhaps.

Now anyone who has had contact with American society in the past fifteen years or so has heard all about these copyright lawsuits, and has probably heard the argument that it is all “really about freedom of speech.” Most of us never really bought into that though. It wasn't really about freedom of speech so much as buying a cable modem and ripping enough tracks to make a mix disc for the weekend, and to make it worth the money you were shelling out for the broadband connection. But as it turns out, these freedom-loving pirate pioneers might have had more insight than most of us ever gave them credit for. It's not just about ripping a free copy of some crappy pop jam anymore. The debates over sharing content over the internet are no longer the frontier of internet free-speech. The goalposts have been on the move it seems.

edit on 11-5-2011 by CobraCommander because: Additional content



posted on May, 11 2011 @ 06:33 PM
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Originally posted by Terrormaster
GREAT! Welcome to China's version of the Internet. And I can betcha sites like WikiLeaks and ah hell even our beloved ATS will most likely get blocked eventually.


Yeah its probably only a matter of time although they may leave conspiracy sites *on air* till the last moment for "blowing steam". And I am saying this by judging egpyt, tunisia and libya strategy! When they are ready to depopulate the internet will go *off air* and the nukes will be flying.

Allah Akbar



posted on May, 12 2011 @ 08:24 AM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 

That makes me sick to my stomach
Democracy oh Democracy where for art thou Democracy.



posted on May, 12 2011 @ 08:37 AM
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If you don't like it, get off the internet lulz.
Second line.



posted on May, 12 2011 @ 08:44 AM
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the idea of starting a new truly free internet has been kicking around for years, I reckon this current war on freedom will make it a reality.

There are many many angry, freedom loving people in this world who know how to, all they need is motivation to work together.



posted on May, 12 2011 @ 12:13 PM
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There are a lot of dirty websites and I feel it is the governments job to protect its people from harmful things they may see on the Internet. Freedom and liberty are outdated concepts, so just get over it.



posted on May, 12 2011 @ 01:12 PM
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I had a reply all ready in my head...well...sort of. I knew I wanted to SOMETHING against this bill but I just...can't make the words materialize on my screen. In place of words I will add this emoticon;




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