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Rsoe database claims one case of bubonic plague in santa fe, nm today

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posted on May, 9 2011 @ 07:44 PM
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Ok, just checked the rsoe disaster database and I realized that in Santa Fe, nm there was a case of the bubonic plague being reported. It was reported today as an epidemic hazard. I am west of sant fe in Albuquerque and have heard nothing of this on the news, all stations in nm are based in albuquerque. Im more concerned that it isnt being talked about on our news. Im also wondering where this person got the plague, its a little bit hard to contract naturally these days right... Heres the link...
hisz.rsoe.hu...
edit on 9-5-2011 by apocalypticangel because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 9 2011 @ 07:50 PM
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reply to post by apocalypticangel
 


I heard it was easy to contract but does occur from time to time, rarely.

I hope it is an isolated incident because I live in ABQ also.
edit on 5/9/2011 by AnteBellum because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2011 @ 07:53 PM
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It is not unusual to find bubonic plague in the West Texas rodent population, according to the Texas Health and Human Services Department. It’s spread to people by direct contact with infected animals such as prairie dogs, squirrels, cats, rats and mice. The odds of this happening are low, but take care anyway. Plague fully deserves its dread-disease status and can be fatal if not treated promptly. You can say that again. Plague epidemics agonized humans for centuries. The 14th Century outbreak in Europe was particularly notorious for wiping out up to half the population. Thankfully, modern medicine has brought the mortality rate of plague in the United States down to about 1 in 7. Between five and 15 Americans die from plague in an average year


hisz.rsoe.hu...


So he probably came in contact with an infected animal. I hope he makes it through this okay.



posted on May, 9 2011 @ 07:54 PM
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If the person was treated in a hospital and does not die within the next three days don't worry. If the person dies tomorrow, the CDC will be in the hunt for any relative and or person who was in contact with the infected person within the last week. Bubonic plague will kill in 4 days so just do a count down. FYI, the disease is contracted by rodents so just stay away from them.



posted on May, 9 2011 @ 07:54 PM
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Damn fleas i cant stand the little bastards, my dog just got over a minor infestation. They just keep coming back each summer. Gotta control them rodents people!



posted on May, 9 2011 @ 07:55 PM
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I'm looking at your link and theres 2 hazardous epidemics in the us. The other one is multi state. Neither state what it is, they are both listed as unknown. For the second one how can you find out what the hazard is.

Here's a link to the 2nd ones analysis. hisz.rsoe.hu...



posted on May, 9 2011 @ 07:56 PM
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reply to post by AnteBellum
 

Dang burque in the house. Yes i hope so too, im pretty tempted to call kob and let them know we want more info. I know the santa fe people have a right to know..especially if it is easy to contract. Of course when you click the info icon on the rsoe database, they paint a nice picture of how safe we are. They reference the steps taken to insure public safety yet fail to list them.



posted on May, 9 2011 @ 07:58 PM
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Well It seems as though the plague is not uncommon in New Mexico according to this.



There were no human bubonic plague cases in New Mexico last year, and six in 2009.

SOURCE: Medical News Today


Unfortunately, my google-fu is failing me. I can't find any articles/reports that confirm this quote.


edit on 9-5-2011 by anon102 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2011 @ 07:58 PM
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Originally posted by finitydream


I'm looking at your link and theres 2 hazardous epidemics in the us. The other one is multi state. Neither state what it is, they are both listed as unknown. For the second one how can you find out what the hazard is.

Here's a link to the 2nd ones analysis. hisz.rsoe.hu...


This is part of the event description for the 2nd one. Its salmonella.


A Florida tomato grower is voluntarily recalling its grape tomatoes after a sample tested positive for salmonella. The affected states are Arizona, Oregon, California, Nevada, Washington, New Mexico, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, South Dakota, Wyoming, Colorado and Utah. The salads were sold in plastic trays and at deli counters in Albertsons, Raley's, Safeway, Savemart, Sam's Club and Walmart stores across the West and some Midwestern states


hisz.rsoe.hu...



posted on May, 9 2011 @ 08:00 PM
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reply to post by AnteBellum
 


It's easy to contract? Really? If that is true wouldn't more people have it? How do you get it anyways? I have read it is from fleas; if that is so is everyone at risk who has pets? I know I have heard of this before in New Mexico but it usually was on like a indian reservation where conditions were very dirty.( I am not saying indian reservations are dirty; just the one I read about.)



posted on May, 9 2011 @ 08:00 PM
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reply to post by finitydream
 

So the multi state one is salmonella, great.



posted on May, 9 2011 @ 08:03 PM
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another person from ABQ here, i believe we have one case a year, we have some that go unreported too. no worries, this is not unusual for NM and the news will probably air something about it in the next two days. you gotta remember our news channels suck. If you want to be up to date on stuff around here just buy a paper.



posted on May, 9 2011 @ 08:04 PM
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reply to post by jcjace
 

Countdown has begun, not to sound horrible but I figure if the person does die, it will make the news. Thats messed up. . Im sending them good thoughts though for a speedy recovery.



posted on May, 9 2011 @ 08:08 PM
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Thanks for the fast reply and info. Salmonella pass on that, I almost lost my daughter when she was a month old to salmonella, that was horrible.



posted on May, 9 2011 @ 08:09 PM
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reply to post by dreamseeker
 


Yes, it is fairly easy to contract:

Plague is a disease that is transmitted from infected animals, usually by fleas, to humans. Plague then may be transmitted from humans to others by direct contact or by touching or breathing droplets that contain the bacterium, Yersinia pestis. Untreated plague causes much suffering and deaths in humans.

Link

This is why it has killed approx. 43 million worldwide!



posted on May, 9 2011 @ 08:13 PM
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reply to post by apocalypticangel
 


Antibiotic treatment is effective against the plague, but needs to be treated early enough to be effective. Untreated death is pretty much guaranteed.

A site I found with a detailed bit on the plague: www.medicinenet.com...



posted on May, 9 2011 @ 08:15 PM
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reply to post by apocalypticangel
 


Please do not view my post as morbid or ill intended. This is simply how to look out for certain clues to problems that can turn into epidemic. Fortunatly for people residing in the us, the cdc has actually set up a very good system.
Anytime certain not so common disases pop up in a hospital, clinicir doctors office, a report has to be made and the CDC will be on it like a fly on a turd.
As much as I do not trust the government much, to me the CDC is one of the few "allies"



posted on May, 9 2011 @ 08:24 PM
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New Mexico......

Home of the brave and land of the flea.

We usually get multiple cases of plague every year. NM leads the nation in plague cases.


www.npr.org...



posted on May, 9 2011 @ 08:42 PM
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Didn't Ghadafi send dead rodents to America a couple or few weeks back?



posted on May, 9 2011 @ 08:44 PM
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reply to post by finitydream
 

Absolutely, and i am soo sorry for your loss. Blessings.



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