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Survival Basic Four

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posted on May, 8 2011 @ 03:52 PM
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There are four basic survival tools that you should always carry, these are by no means the only things you will need in a disaster scenario, but are the things that you should never leave behind.

1. Something to carry water
2. Something to boil water
3. Something to start a fire
4. Something to cut

Some examples of this may be:
An economic setup that you most likely already have: a bottle, a tin can, a lighter and a kitchen knife; or a more advanced setup: a canteen, a small pot, flint and steel and a survival knife

I always keep mine near me, you can never be too prepared.




posted on May, 8 2011 @ 03:55 PM
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nice post, but none of these are going to help you if you have no shelter..

remember the 3's you'll only survive - 3 weeks without food, 3 days without water , and 3 hours without shelter.



posted on May, 8 2011 @ 03:55 PM
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edit on 8-5-2011 by Nobama because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2011 @ 04:01 PM
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Originally posted by Nobama
nice post, but none of these are going to help you if you have no shelter..

remember the 3's you'll only survive - 3 weeks without food, 3 days without water , and 3 hours without shelter.

Agree with you, but how easily can you carry shelter with you? a shelter can be easily built if you are in the wilderness with the help of a knife, even better if you are in a urban environment.
Again, I'm not saying these are the only thing you should carry, but they are definitely the only thing you should not forget.



posted on May, 8 2011 @ 04:22 PM
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I agree with your 4 items, if you are limiting yourself to just four. Those four are the hardest, most time consuming and energy inefficient things to craft in the wild from natural materials. And as you said, these are common household items.

For those with the time and money to purchase, one option would be the US military canteen, the canteen cup. Carrying these items in something larger than the basic cover affords room for a small fire kit and lighter and a modern quality multi-tool such as a Leatherman. While a solid fix bladed knife is always preferred, a good folder is better than nothing or making a stone flake knife or a sharpened bone knife.


As for light, easy to carry shelter. A bit of cordage (even kite string if nothing else) and a large garbage bag (like a contractor's garbage bag that is 2-3 mil thick) folds up nicely in a hip pocket. Yes, cordage and simple natural material shelters can be made fairly quickly in the wild, but again we are talking time and energy. And on the subject of the garbage bags, if you have two of them, cut the bottom out of one and duct tape them together for a larger shelter without significantly increasing the weight or bulk when folded up.
edit on 8-5-2011 by Ahabstar because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2011 @ 04:30 PM
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What I have figured out for water is those new BPA free aluminum or stainless water bottles. They carry water, and can be used to boil water... 2 birds, 1 stone. Saves space.



posted on May, 8 2011 @ 04:48 PM
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Originally posted by mbartelsm
There are four basic survival tools that you should always carry, these are by no means the only things you will need in a disaster scenario, but are the things that you should never leave behind.

1. Something to carry water
2. Something to boil water
3. Something to start a fire
4. Something to cut

Some examples of this may be:
An economic setup that you most likely already have: a bottle, a tin can, a lighter and a kitchen knife; or a more advanced setup: a canteen, a small pot, flint and steel and a survival knife

I always keep mine near me, you can never be too prepared.


I agree, I can deal with the shelter as I go.

Shelter is very easy if your in the woods, small bit of knowledge and a couple hours of work you can have a very nice shelter that will keep you warm in the winter. If you have any army survival manuals that is a good place to look.

Here is a link to the manuals, Topic: List Of Militiary Field Manuals PDF Look for "Army Rangers FM" Field Manuals or survival.

As for carrying a shelter, one of those reflective blankets or a poncho can be put to good use too,


edit on 8-5-2011 by Tygart because: (no reason given)

edit on 8-5-2011 by Tygart because: (no reason given)

edit on 8-5-2011 by Tygart because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2011 @ 05:28 PM
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Originally posted by sk8erchick
What I have figured out for water is those new BPA free aluminum or stainless water bottles. They carry water, and can be used to boil water... 2 birds, 1 stone. Saves space.

Thats a good idea, but I'd rather use non lubricated condoms, each one can easily carry 1L of water and also have an extra use.
edit on 8/5/2011 by mbartelsm because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2011 @ 12:50 AM
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Originally posted by Nobama

and 3 hours without shelter.


You can only survive 3 hours without shelter? Is not having AC really that bad?



posted on May, 9 2011 @ 08:41 AM
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Originally posted by FEDec

Originally posted by Nobama

and 3 hours without shelter.


You can only survive 3 hours without shelter? Is not having AC really that bad?


Its a survival rule for extreme weather, survive in a desert without covering yourself from the sun, or survive a blizzard without wind protection, you can't, if you are in this forum you should at least know that rule.



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 09:19 PM
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What about the fifth? Twinkies



posted on May, 20 2011 @ 09:31 AM
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While I wouldn't consider it a survival 'tool,' one thing I think many people forget about is having a full tank of gas in your vehicle. I know I'm guilty of not stopping to fill up until I'm on empty. But if there was a true disaster scenario, you may not have the time or opportunity to fill up. I'm trying to get into the habit of getting gas when I get down to half a tank, but it's not that easy.

My plan for survival (potentially, depending on scenario) would be to leave the big city and head back to my small hometown to meet up with family. But even if your plan is to stay put, having access to a few more gallons of gas in your vehicle is a good thing.



posted on May, 20 2011 @ 12:41 PM
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A buddy had an on road off road dirt bike, fat tires, good mountain bike. I would add that to a survival gear for any one person Bug-Out.




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