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Another reactor in Japan goes offline after radiation spike

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posted on May, 7 2011 @ 09:25 PM
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Reactor in Fukui Prefecture shut down after radiation levels spike

A reactor at the Tsuruga nuclear power plant in Fukui Prefecture has been shut down May 7 for an emergency check following a jump in radioactive readings.

Japan Atomic Power Co., the plant operator, said May 6 the irregular readings at the No. 2 reactor could indicate damage to fuel assemblies in its core.

During scheduled maintenance May 2, radioactive noble gas was measured at 3,900 becquerels per cubic centimeter, 750 times normal, while iodine was two to four times normal.

However, the readings were still within safe levels, Japan Atomic Power said.


That's just brilliant... and of course they say it's ``all safe``... just like Fukushima is right?
Please Japan... do some freaking renovations to all your nuclear reactors before it destroys the earth.




posted on May, 7 2011 @ 09:35 PM
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Originally posted by Vitchilo

Japan Atomic Power Co., the plant operator, said May 6 the irregular readings at the No. 2 reactor could indicate damage to fuel assemblies in its core.


Damage to the "fuel assemblies in it's core"?

Sounds very melt-downish to me. What say you?

What kind of non-melt-down damage is possible to the fuel assemblies in the core?

Any nuclear physicists want to inform me what potential scenarios we are dealing with here?
Thanks.

Flag this thread people.

IMHO if we gripe and freak out on nuclear power enough, maybe they will decommission all of the plants and start transitioning to something like say solar power? Hey I can dream right?



posted on May, 7 2011 @ 09:48 PM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 

maybe stuxnet with some hidden war taking place (if not between ptbs against us obviously) if we refer to the "there are no coincidences" theory;

2 plants going off in 2 month in separate places in the same country hum...



Stuxnet is a Windows computer worm discovered in July 2010 that targets industrial software and equipment.[1] While it is not the first time that hackers have targeted industrial systems,[2] it is the first discovered malware that spies on and subverts industrial systems,[3] and the first to include a programmable logic controller (PLC) rootkit

en.wikipedia.org...



Stuxnet, a computer virus designed to attack servers isolated from the Internet, such as at power plants, has been confirmed on 63 personal computers in Japan since July, according to major security firm Symantec Corp.

www.yomiuri.co.jp... (oct 2010)
edit on 7-5-2011 by XmikaX because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 7 2011 @ 10:59 PM
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Sounds like the Zircaloy cladding on one of the fuel rods has failed. or one of the holding tubes is leaking.
Not any type of meltdown

Not real common but it does happen.

mydocs.epri.com...



posted on May, 8 2011 @ 01:22 AM
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This really comes as no surprise.

Japan has been getting hammered with non-stop earthquakes for two months now. It's bound to do some damage eventually. No structure can handle continuous shaking and rattling, no matter how great the engineering.



posted on May, 8 2011 @ 07:28 AM
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reply to post by CranialSponge
 


Is it really? I have no means of being rude or anything. I'm just thinking if the amount of earthquakes (in Japan) looks "supernatural", because we just pay more attention to it after the big one... and compare it with our own experiences of them? Has the amount of earthquakes in Japan really increased after the 3-11? Just curious.



posted on May, 8 2011 @ 12:36 PM
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Originally posted by Vitchilo
Reactor in Fukui Prefecture shut down after radiation levels spike

A reactor at the Tsuruga nuclear power plant in Fukui Prefecture has been shut down May 7 for an emergency check following a jump in radioactive readings.

Japan Atomic Power Co., the plant operator, said May 6 the irregular readings at the No. 2 reactor could indicate damage to fuel assemblies in its core.

During scheduled maintenance May 2, radioactive noble gas was measured at 3,900 becquerels per cubic centimeter, 750 times normal, while iodine was two to four times normal.

However, the readings were still within safe levels, Japan Atomic Power said.


That's just brilliant... and of course they say it's ``all safe``... just like Fukushima is right?
Please Japan... do some freaking renovations to all your nuclear reactors before it destroys the earth.

Before?
I think we've passed that



posted on May, 8 2011 @ 01:14 PM
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Originally posted by ADEzor
reply to post by CranialSponge
 


Is it really? I have no means of being rude or anything. I'm just thinking if the amount of earthquakes (in Japan) looks "supernatural", because we just pay more attention to it after the big one... and compare it with our own experiences of them? Has the amount of earthquakes in Japan really increased after the 3-11? Just curious.


Japan is known for it's regular tremors, but not 5 to 15 of them (ranging from 4 to 6) every day, day after day, for 2 months nonstop... which is what's been happening since the 9.1. For the first few weeks, the aftershocks were happening every hour on the hour.

No one knows how long these "aftershocks" are going to carry on for until the area around Japan finally settles and falls back into its regular regiment of semi-stability and getting the odd tremor every few days, which would be the norm.



posted on May, 8 2011 @ 02:48 PM
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reply to post by CranialSponge
 


I stand corrected
I also did some googling about big earthquakes in Japan



posted on May, 8 2011 @ 10:05 PM
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Originally posted by ANNED
Sounds like the Zircaloy cladding on one of the fuel rods has failed. or one of the holding tubes is leaking.
Not any type of meltdown

Not real common but it does happen.

mydocs.epri.com...


Here is something interesting I found under the topic "Core Damage Frequency".
Wiki link CDF

Core damage frequency (CDF) is a term used in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) that indicates the likelihood of an accident that would cause damage to a nuclear reactor core.



Core damage accidents are considered serious because damage to the core may prevent control of the nuclear reaction, which can lead to a nuclear meltdown.



Some sources on CDF consider core damage and core meltdown to be the same thing, and different methods of measurement are used between industries and nations, so the primary value of the CDF number is in managing the risk of core accidents within a system and not necessarily to provide large-scale statistics.


So when they say Core Damage, it's safe to assume control over the reaction has been lost or minimalized to some extent, and that a meltdown could ensue if corrective action is not taken immediately before the materials reach high temperatures.

Once I found that it caused me to realize that my intuition about the direct similarity to core damage ----> meltdown was indeed not unfounded or unrealistic.



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