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Nuke Cannon?

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posted on Aug, 1 2004 @ 02:41 PM
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Originally posted by FredT
Your right, but these insane weapons (atomic annie and Davey crockett) were really ment for use on open Soviet troop formations. You would get way more destrcution if you dropped them in the heart of a city. Advancing troops would be pretty spread out, you you would want a pretty wide blast area to get the maximum damage.

It is really scary that the planners thought that they could keep a nuclear exchange like this on a tactical level.


Yeah but if soviets troops were advancing on western land, the chances are that there would be a full scale nuclear war involving strategic weapons anyway.




posted on Aug, 1 2004 @ 03:16 PM
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Hyperen your right about that, I doubt it would get to the point where we would use battlefield nukes and not use ICBM's. Plus its counter productive you kill some of you own troops in the region and contaminate your land.



posted on Aug, 2 2004 @ 12:09 PM
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Nice video. Yep its real all right. Or at least it could be real. Atomic Annie. Yep they stuck nukes on everything back then. The nuclear A2A missle. Then there was the nuclear cruise missles, and nuclear powered airplane. It amazes me what they were doing back in the cold war. Oh yeah my favorite the nuclear RPG. Just a few of the things nuclear was added to in the cold war.



posted on Aug, 2 2004 @ 02:02 PM
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CD you forgot about the nuclear back pack, like a satchel charge but with nukes to take out houses or buildings using the power of the nuke. It kind of scary if it got into the wrong hands but this shows that they took the Cold War really serious.



posted on Aug, 2 2004 @ 02:07 PM
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*smacks head* How could I have forgotten about the backpack? But yeah scary what you could do with some of this stuff. Oh yeah and I nearly forgot the Soviets nuclear torpedo. Oh yeah that would have been fun getting vaporized while your underwater. Makes me wonder what happened to most of those weapons.



posted on Feb, 17 2006 @ 11:23 PM
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Originally posted by ShadowXIX
That was indeed a real weapon. Check out this though
The Davy Crockett

The Davy Crockett (shown here at the Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland in March 1961) was the smallest and lightest nuclear weapon ever deployed by the U.S. military. It was designed for use in Europe against Soviet troop formations.

The Davy Crockett consisted of an XM-388 projectile launched from either a 120-millimeter (XM-28) or 155-millimeter (XM-29) recoilless rifle (the 120 millimeter version is shown above). This weapon had a maximum range of 1.24 miles (120 millimeter) to 2.49 miles (155 millimeter). The XM-388 casing (including the warhead and fin assembly) weighed 76 pounds, was 30 inches long and measured 11 inches in diameter (at its widest point).




THe Davy Crockett was seen in the Movie Godzilla VS King kong when it was still Top Secret
I am not BF ing



posted on Feb, 18 2006 @ 12:24 AM
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Man, I gotta see that Trinity and Beyond movie


I'm such a, well, fan on nukes (well just because the explosions are pretty!
) it's not even funny.

The Nuclear cannon is one of my favorites, it's got everything I love, heavy artillery, big huge muzzle flash...nuclear mushroom


Pretty interesting about that Davy Crocket in that movie, got anything to back it up?



posted on Feb, 18 2006 @ 12:36 AM
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The DK was a silly burp and wasn't deployed.
On theother hand, there were plenty of 8" howitzer rounds in Europe to be used against Soviet formations.
Assuming they were able to get into the field before Soviet SS missiles hit their storage areas.

Had things gone from sugar to Shinola, the countryside would have gotten pretty darned hot.



posted on Feb, 18 2006 @ 01:14 AM
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you guys do know that the 155mm towed howitzer is nuclear capable dont you????
Why do you think the Army is reluctant to go below 155mm now days in towed artillery???
It is a special trained team which practices on these maneuvers. How to handle ,load, and use this artillery piece.

I am not sure how this plays now days with all these other better delivery systems like aircraft and tomahawk missles etc but these artillery pieces are capable. These new long barreled artillery pieces today will throw the shells alot further than the 11 to 14 miles of short barreled howitzers in the olde days. Even artillery technology has come along way in the last twenty years...GPS positioning and sighting/targeting here too.

Something for some of you to think about ..not all is as seems.
Orangetom



posted on Feb, 18 2006 @ 01:16 AM
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one of the reasons stuff like this nuclear cannon in the video went out of style is that it is not portable enough ...they cant just shoot and scoot. It would probably take all daya and night to set up ..by that time the battle front has moved on .

Thanks,
Orangetom



posted on Feb, 18 2006 @ 10:34 AM
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Originally posted by Browno
What was 'Project Babylon'?

www.disinfotainmenttoday.com...

www.abovetopsecret.com...

www.globalsecurity.org...

www.globalsecurity.org...


Erm....... I reckon that the links you posted make pretty good reading on the question your asking Browno, and pretty much answer your question for you ,good read though



posted on Feb, 18 2006 @ 10:46 AM
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Originally posted by orangetom1999
you guys do know that the 155mm towed howitzer is nuclear capable dont you????
Why do you think the Army is reluctant to go below 155mm now days in towed artillery???
It is a special trained team which practices on these maneuvers. How to handle ,load, and use this artillery piece.

I am not sure how this plays now days with all these other better delivery systems like aircraft and tomahawk missles etc but these artillery pieces are capable. These new long barreled artillery pieces today will throw the shells alot further than the 11 to 14 miles of short barreled howitzers in the olde days. Even artillery technology has come along way in the last twenty years...GPS positioning and sighting/targeting here too.

Something for some of you to think about ..not all is as seems.
Orangetom


Actually i just seen the new Arty piece thats coming to the American and Brits .. Its called the Crusader and can fire a round 33 miles .

Very interesting , it can carry a wide array of arty rounds .



posted on Feb, 18 2006 @ 11:02 AM
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Originally posted by GrOuNd_ZeRo
Man, I gotta see that Trinity and Beyond movie


I'm such a, well, fan on nukes (well just because the explosions are pretty!
) it's not even funny.

The Nuclear cannon is one of my favorites, it's got everything I love, heavy artillery, big huge muzzle flash...nuclear mushroom


Pretty interesting about that Davy Crocket in that movie, got anything to back it up?


Yes the Movie v and Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Feb, 18 2006 @ 12:31 PM
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This was the device used in the Atmoic Annie 280mm cannon on the Grable test.


W9 T-124 280mm AFAP

Steps were also taken to develop Army weapons capable of delivering atomic weapons on the battlefield. The first weapon to appear was the mammoth 280mm gun. Since the 280mm gun had already been designed, the major developmental problem was evidently the design of a stable, rugged and relatively small atomic round that could be fired by the artillery. With reductions in size and an increase in the variety of yields, production of such a round soon became possible.

A live test of the Mk-9 fired from the 280mm cannon was the 15-kiloton GRABLE test conducted on May 25, 1953, as part of Operation Upshot-Knothole. A single test shot was fired seven miles at the Nevada Test site. The Army successfully fired an atomic shell from the World War II vintage 280mm gun, which detonated 160 meters above ground. The resulting 15 kt GRABLE explosion not only symbolized the addition of an awesome new weapon to the Army's arsenal, but also symbolized the true beginning of the atomic era for the Army. This shot was the first detonation of a gun-type atomic bomb since the bombing of Hiroshima on 06 August 1945.

W9/Mk.9 280mm Nuclear Projectile





Originally posted by orangetom1999
you guys do know that the 155mm towed howitzer is nuclear capable dont you????


You are correct any 155mm howitzer could fire a nuclear shell. Several 155mm nuclear projectiles were produced.


The US has developed several nuclear artillery shells in the 155 mm caliber. The only one to be deployed was the W-48 nuclear warhead developed by UCRL, packaged in the M-45 AFAP (artillery fired atomic projectile) shell. The W-48 nuclear warhead measured 86 cm (34") long and weighed 53.5-58 kg (118-128 lbs). Its yield was on the order of 70 to 100 tons (it was tested in the Hardtack II Tamalpais shot with a yield of 72 tons, predicted yield was 100-300 tons).

The smallest diameter US test device publicly known was the Livermore Swift device fired in the Redwing Yuma shot on 28 May 1956. It had a 5" (12.7 cm) diameter, a length of 62.2 cm (24.5 inches) and weighed 43.5 kg (96 lb). The test had a yield of 190 tons, but was intended to be fusion boosted (and thus would probably have had a yield in the kiloton range) but its yield was insufficient to ignite the fusion reaction and it failed to boost in this test. This test may have been a predecessor to the W-48 design.



W-48 155mm Nuclear Projectile



The W82, a weapon program for the 155-millimeter howitzer, was assigned to Livermore, but that program was canceled in the mid-1980s prior to deployment. The W82 had a yield of up to 2 kilotons and weighed 43 kg (95 lb), but included a number of sophisticated additional features within this weight. Since it was capable of being fielded with a "neutron bomb" (enhanced radiation) option, which is intrinsically more complex than a basic nuclear warhead, and was in addition rocket boosted, the actual minimum nuclear package was substantially lighter than the weight of the complete round. Its overall length was 86 cm (34").

The W82 weas to be a battlefield nuclear weapons with an “enhanced radiation” (ER) capability. ER provided a relatively high fraction of the prompt weapon output in the form of neutrons (hence the nickname “neutron bomb”). ER technology began to be developed at Livermore in the early 1960s and entered the stockpile in 1974 with the deployment of the W66 warhead for the Sprint antiballistic missile interceptor.

W-82/XM-785 155mm Nuclear Projectile



Lighter 155 mm designs were developed, including the W74 (canceled early in development), and the W-82/XM-785 shell.

W-74 155mm Nuclear Projectile - Cancelled



Why do you think the Army is reluctant to go below 155mm now days in towed artillery???


The main reason is that with todays cargo carrying shells anything smaller than 155mm doesn't have enough capacity to carry the required amount of submunitions.



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