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Three NASA scientists confirmed there was life on Mars.

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posted on May, 6 2011 @ 09:39 AM
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So, I would say its a fair assumption to think that the conditions to support microbial life exists on practically all planets considering their apparent adaptations to the most extreme environments. However any evolution beyond the simplest of organisms is not known to be possible outside certain environmental parameters suitable for complex life.




posted on May, 6 2011 @ 09:49 AM
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Originally posted by amaster
So, I would say its a fair assumption to think that the conditions to support microbial life exists on practically all planets considering their apparent adaptations to the most extreme environments. However any evolution beyond the simplest of organisms is not known to be possible outside certain environmental parameters suitable for complex life.


I was about to say the exact same thing.

With the theories of inner earth, it's far from impossible this doesn't happen on other planets and satellites.
Under the gasses of Jupiter, under the crust of Phobos.

If we go even farther, hell aliens living there is not impossible!

ARRG, why can't we not just live together, forget money and work towards space travel.
There is nothing in the universe that is worth more then Love and Knowledge, it's time people see this.



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 10:38 AM
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Originally posted by NomDeGuerre

Originally posted by Lunica
How does a meteoroid comes from Mars to Earth? It just lifted up?


When it gets ejected from the Martian surface and atmosphere through a violent event such as a meteorite crashing into Mars

Has NASA ever recorded sightings of Martian rocks leaving Mars owing to meteorite impacts?



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 10:47 AM
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Originally posted by User8911ARRG, why can't we not just live together, forget money and work towards space travel.
There is nothing in the universe that is worth more then Love and Knowledge, it's time people see this.


I couldn't agree more. In fact so much so it's going in my signature here (with credit). What a wonderful thought on Space Day.



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 10:59 AM
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Originally posted by RSF77

Don't all the planets (and other solar bodies) slowly move inward towards the sun? Gravitation tends to attract things right.



Yes, but mass = gravity and our sun is constantly burning off it's mass, therefore it's logical to assume that as the mass shrinks, the gravitational effect does too?

I could be way off mind..



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 11:24 AM
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reply to post by Terrormaster
 


Oh thank you

But you forgot the ARRRG ^^ jk hehe
edit on 6-5-2011 by User8911 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 11:26 AM
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Seems that NASA is trying to say : "Well, we can't lie anymore...so we better start telling them all before it will get to obvious".



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 11:30 AM
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Originally posted by Terrormaster

Originally posted by User8911ARRG, why can't we not just live together, forget money and work towards space travel.
There is nothing in the universe that is worth more then Love and Knowledge, it's time people see this.


I couldn't agree more. In fact so much so it's going in my signature here (with credit). What a wonderful thought on Space Day.


I don't mean to be off subject here, but you may want to correct one tiny little grammatical error first.

It should read: "Why can we not . . . "

Just saying.



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 11:32 AM
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Originally posted by Beavers
Yes, but mass = gravity and our sun is constantly burning off it's mass, therefore it's logical to assume that as the mass shrinks, the gravitational effect does too?

I could be way off mind..


Not a bad logical assumption! How ever i'm not sure if it really works that way, i think the mass stays the same, only the size changes...



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 11:36 AM
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I think we should send some lichen or whatever we think might be able to survive on mars to mars and let earth life grow and spread. We have such a rich and diverse web of life here it would truly be a shame to let something snuff it.



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 11:37 AM
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reply to post by Beavers
 


I thought so before too, but I did the math. Over the 10 billion years that the sun is burning it's fuel it losses less than 0.00000001 percent. I accounted for CME's, solar flares and solar winds and still it lost an insignificant amount of it's mass.

I thought that the sun would lose enough mass to make our orbit recede so when it goes red giant we would be put of the way, but I was wrong.


Pred...



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 11:50 AM
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We get closer to the sun due to orbital decay. Obviously the solar system was hot during accretion, everything was and everything was colliding. That's partly why life didn't form on Earth until it was a billion years old, and Mars never was settled enough when it was hot for life, as it cooled it lost its atmosphere to space and rapidly became more solid and thats also why surface liquid water is mostly an unproven theory, or more like a fantasy because liquid water would immediately evaporate to space, there's more of a chance of liquid water deep beneath the thick Martian crust. The surface ice is primarily CO2, dry ice.

From the top of my head, I'd have to research for hours for verifications from reputable sources.



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 12:01 PM
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Even during its current life in the main sequence, the Sun is gradually becoming more luminous (about 10% every 1 billion years), and its surface temperature is slowly rising. The Sun used to be fainter in the past, which is possibly the reason life on Earth has only existed for about 1 billion years on land. The increase in solar temperatures is such that in about another billion years the surface of the Earth will likely become too hot for liquid water to exist, ending all terrestrial life.
Wiki

By this understanding, perhaps we are looking at start of life on Mars.



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 12:50 PM
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Originally posted by Beavers
as our sun burns off it's mass does it's gravity force weaken?

did mars' atmosphere die the further it got from the sun?

could venus become a terra style planet whilst earth becomes a mars?

clutching at logical straws maybe



Mars own gravity is more of a factor as far as its ability goes to maintain an atmosphere. I am not sure how many bars of atmospheric pressure would be possible on Mars right now.



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 12:51 PM
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In other news the head of the Martian Science Directorate Dr. Flubizzlebop went public declaring there was once life on Earth.



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 01:02 PM
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Originally posted by linliangtai
reply to post by Vortiki
 


"Simultaneously, our entire solar system is hurtling through space."
Just curious why Earth did not collide with or come close to other heavenly bodies except meteos?
Is that not a sign of intelligent design?

"Inteligent design?" No just "physics": Depends on your"basic assumption".
Assumption 1): the universe and the physical laws it functions under; was, is and has always"been".

or:
Assumption 2): a supreme being"(i.e. Morgan Freeman, Eric Clapton; George Carlins" invisible man in the skyyyyy"); was, is, and has always been and is responsible for creating our known universe and the physical laws it operates under.
"Your choice"...neither is exclusive ( you don't have to pick only one OR the other).

edit on 6-5-2011 by 46ACE because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 01:17 PM
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According to the Associated Press, Davies thinks that life from elsewhere in the galaxy has made its way to Earth at several points in human history. It’s possible, he says, that alien life is “right under our noses—or even in our noses.”

And why not? So many science-fiction writers seem convinced that if aliens of any shape or size were to come to Earth, they’ll be bad for humans and hence immediately noticable. Giant robots! Predatory stalkers!! Killer pathogens!!! Yes, Michael Crichton, I’m looking at you.

But that certainly doesn’t have to be the case.

For starters, consider the odds of an intelligent race of beings existing elsewhere in the universe.


newswatch.nationalgeographic.com...


This has been an ongoing consideration for some time- as they let people acclimate to the idea that the barbie human being that has been sold to them is not necessarily the whole truth. They've been letting the information out in dribbles, letting people get used to the idea.

No one wants to believe they're not always in control of everything they do- or that they're not a singular entity.



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 01:31 PM
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We should use ground penetrating radar on mars.
edit on 6-5-2011 by tetsuoatx because: typo



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 02:47 PM
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reply to post by amaster
 


You only have to look at the likes of extremophiles to get an idea of how resilient life actually is.

This organism, for example, is known as the tardigrade. It is extremely resilient, some species can survive at temperatures of -273°C (0.15°C above absolute zero
); temperatures as high as 151°C; 1000 times more radiation than other animals
and almost a decade without water



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 04:00 PM
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Life is everywhere, in the open space, on planets, or wherever else exchange happens.




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