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How many living people have walked on another world?

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posted on May, 4 2011 @ 11:28 PM
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A nice graphic!

xkcd.com...

I wold embed it but the rollover text is worth reading too.


edit on 4-5-2011 by Aloysius the Gaul because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 5 2011 @ 04:56 AM
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No offense...

But I think that graphic sucks!

but the roll-over text is pretty cool...



"The universe is probably littered with one-planet graves of cultures which made the sensible economic decision that there's no good reason to go into space--each discovered, studied, and remembered by the ones who made the irrational decision."

Source-Same as in the OP

So nice find there



posted on May, 5 2011 @ 10:08 AM
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Yet another reason why I love xkcd.

For the record, there were 12 men. Three have died, leaving nine.

Neil Armstrong
"Buzz" Aldrin
"Pete" Conrad (Deceased - Motorcycle accident)*
Alan Bean
Alan Shepard (Deceased - Leukemia)
Edgar Mitchell
David Scott
Jim Irwin (Deceased - Heart attack)
John Young
Charlie Duke
Gene Cernan
"Jack" Schmitt

*Conrad is my hero: Naval aviator, test pilot, astronaut, set an endurance record (8 days) ,was the first person to perform orbital rendezvous less than one orbit after liftoff, flew the highest manned Earth orbit ever (850 miles - into the lower Van Allen Belt, performed the first precision landing on the Moon, performed a risky space walk to save the Skylab space station. Known for his raunchy sense of humor and zest for life, at age 69 he missed a turn at high-speed on his motorcycle. The End. Now THAT'S a life!



posted on May, 5 2011 @ 10:35 AM
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Originally posted by Saint Exupery
Yet another reason why I love xkcd.

For the record, there were 12 men. Three have died, leaving nine.

Neil Armstrong
"Buzz" Aldrin
"Pete" Conrad (Deceased - Motorcycle accident)*
Alan Bean
Alan Shepard (Deceased - Leukemia)
Edgar Mitchell
David Scott
Jim Irwin (Deceased - Heart attack)
John Young
Charlie Duke
Gene Cernan
"Jack" Schmitt

*Conrad is my hero: Naval aviator, test pilot, astronaut, set an endurance record (8 days) ,was the first person to perform orbital rendezvous less than one orbit after liftoff, flew the highest manned Earth orbit ever (850 miles - into the lower Van Allen Belt, performed the first precision landing on the Moon, performed a risky space walk to save the Skylab space station. Known for his raunchy sense of humor and zest for life, at age 69 he missed a turn at high-speed on his motorcycle. The End. Now THAT'S a life!


Please read the thread title again.

The moon is not "another world".

It is a satellite of the earth.

It is influenced by the earth and it influences the earth.

So technically they and even those on the ISS have not traveled in space.

Space is defined by a certain distance from the earth past the moon where the earth does not have any influence.

But it sounds good when we say,Man has traveled in space".

But it is not true.



posted on May, 5 2011 @ 11:32 AM
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Not sure what you consider 'influence', because influence travels to infinity. The point of where a body's influence is overcome by another body's influence is called the body's Hill sphere.

An astronomical body's Hill sphere is the region in which it dominates the attraction of satellites. For a planet to retain a moon, the moon must have an orbit that lies within the Hill sphere of the planet. That moon would, in turn, have a Hill sphere of its own. Any object within that distance would tend to become a satellite of the moon, rather than of the planet itself.

Within the solar system, the planet with the largest Hill radius is Neptune, with 116 million km, or 0.775 AU; its great distance from the Sun amply compensates for its small mass relative to Jupiter (whose own Hill radius measures 53 million km). The Hill sphere for Earth thus extends out to about 1.5 Gm (0.01 AU). The Moon's orbit, at a distance of 0.370 Gm from Earth, is comfortably within the gravitational sphere of influence of Earth and is therefore not at risk of being pulled into an independent orbit around the Sun.

The definition of space is more obscure, and largely an agreed upon number, in most circles 100 km, or 62 miles, but to orbit the earth without crashing immediately back down, is about 220 miles up, or about 350 km. Earth's influence over the sun's extends out to about 93,000 miles, beyond that a body would orbit the sun instead of earth.



posted on May, 5 2011 @ 11:37 AM
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The interesting thing about the Apollo moon launches is, the spacecrafts in orbit around the moon became satellites of the moon, artificial satellite but a lunar satellite and not an earth satellite, so indeed the moon IS another world, capable of having its own moons. The sun is in orbit around the Milky Way, so why give the sun a distinction of not itself being a satellite of the Milky Way?



posted on May, 5 2011 @ 12:28 PM
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Originally posted by IamJustanAmerican
Please read the thread title again.

The moon is not "another world".
Have you ever heard of a thing called "context"?

The thread is more than just the title. The OP references a graphic of the number of people who have walked on another world, so the OP just copied that reference.

In reference to the rollover text, the moon would indeed qualify as another world for avoiding extinction in some types of natural disasters, such as a rock the size of Mt Everest hitting the Earth at high speed which wiped out the dinosaurs. (I also think the rollover text could be part of the solution to the Fermi Paradox, especially if humans are any example of intelligent life).

But you do make a point that there are other types of disasters where the moon isn't far enough. To completely escape the fate of the sun when it grows in size to encompass the current orbit of the Earth, survival will probably entail leaving the Earth completely since life as we know it won't be possible after all the oceans have boiled away. The moons of Jupiter or Saturn may become reasonably habitable temperature-wise as the habitable zone extends outwards. But eventually, only interstellar travel will save whatever life remains.

At one time I thought we had several billion years to figure this out, but apparently we don't have that long. Even as soon as one billion years from now or even less, the Earth may already be getting way hotter than today.



posted on May, 5 2011 @ 05:42 PM
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Sorry my math had a brain fart as I was posting from the office, (shh), Earth's Hill sphere extends out 1,395,000 miles, so the moon is well within it, D'Oh!



posted on May, 5 2011 @ 05:50 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


The moon receding away from earth could have a faster effect to cool earth's tectonic activity than the sun expanding, which really won't happen until the sun is on its death march, during its last billion years, and some say the death and expansion of a star like the sun can happen in just a couple of hundred million years, so your first impression that we have a couple–three billion years of relative existence left, in my mind is more correct. That is if the earth's own continent shifting, super volcanic eruptions, and ice age cycle allows us the opportunity to adapt. Or an Elenin comet impact (had to throw that in for chuckles).



posted on May, 5 2011 @ 07:38 PM
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Some interesting comments here - I'm no longer surprised how people take something like this so literally that they have to quible over scietific definitions when the work is not seintific in the first place....being a pedant in some fields myself I sometimes fall prey to the temptation too.

Peraonlly I particularly liked the actuarial allowances at the end of the graph.....



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 12:28 AM
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Just wondering why the quotation marks surrounding three of the men , are they special in some way?



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 09:46 AM
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reply to post by Dr Expired
 


The names in quotation marks are nicknames that they were known as.
Their given names were Edwin Aldrin (he later legally changed his name to Buzz), Charles Conrad and Harrison Schmitt.

If you click on each name, you will find their full names and astronaut biographies.



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 07:13 PM
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Originally posted by Illustronic
reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


The moon receding away from earth could have a faster effect to cool earth's tectonic activity than the sun expanding, which really won't happen until the sun is on its death march, during its last billion years
Yes, that's exactly what I used to think. And you're right that the dramatic expansion of the sun will occur in the several billion years from now. And I think you're overestimating the effect of the moon moving away. Yes it will have an effect, but not as dramatic as the sun, I suspect.

Here's what I was referring to when I said I since learned it will heat up on Earth to uninhabitable levels (for humans) long before the end of the sun's life:

en.wikipedia.org...

Once the solar luminosity is 10% higher than its current value, the average global surface temperature reaches 320 K (47 °C). The atmosphere will become a humid greenhouse leading to a runaway evaporation of the oceans.[49] At this point, models of the Earth's future environment demonstrate that the stratosphere would contain increasing levels of water. These water molecules will be broken down through photodissociation by solar ultraviolet radiation, allowing hydrogen to escape the atmosphere. The net result would be a loss of the world's sea water in about 1.1 billion years from the present.
Just that 10% increase in the sun's output over the next billion years will have a devastating effect on the Earth. They go on to confirm what you were saying will happen much later:


The most rapid part of the Sun's expansion into a red giant occurs during the final stages, when the Sun is about 12 billion years old. It is likely to expand to swallow both Mercury and Venus, reaching a maximum radius of 1.2 astronomical units (180 Gm). The Earth will interact tidally with the Sun's outer atmosphere, which would serve to decrease the orbital radius. Drag from the chromosphere of the Sun would also reduce the Earth's orbit. These effects will act to counterbalance the mass loss by the Sun, and the Earth will most likely be engulfed by the sun.
So what you said is true, however my point was, Earth will be mostly uninhabitable for humans long before that happens, so we probably have less than a billion years, not billions. Not that it will affect us personally, but it would be nice to think our species might be able to survive the death of the Earth, and go on living in another colony elsewhere.



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 09:14 PM
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Arbitrageur, I love your articulation. Interesting, I have to look into this before I can entertain any kind of debate that the hypnosis I extended, is fatally flawed, or not. My 'niche' of interest is deficient concerning the sun's life, and I tend to look at smaller aspects of the part of planetary habitable zones, and not so much the duration of such.

But yes a billion years of human existence could open a universe of things we cannot comprehend now, which I believe is the crux of ET speculation without solid proof. We know stars are older than ours, we know life is ultimately coagulated from stardust, we believe that if we evolved in 3.5 billion years, an even older star system like our own just a million years senior of us, would/could have grasped the means to reach us we have yet to discover, in stealth.

I like to keep grounded on what our repeatable physics' observations demonstrate to our understanding so I don't go off on speculation much. I'm a terrible writer and my wife is not an editor, I illustrate and use artistic license when I type with sentence structure, (I know bad, I cheated in high school), let that be a lesson to youngsters.

Now I forgot what I was going to point out, Oh yes, it is my own (maybe flawed) assumption that earth would become a 'water world' long before a desert dry rock–the death of man. A layman's logic of heating would support that. It could be very short lived but consider as the water rises, the atmosphere thickens, and that aids to block the increasing solar heating, (no AGW debate here) should internal heat of the earth cool from a reseeding moon, at a faster pace than the sun heating, may even-out, sort of? But you show numbers to suggest I'm wrong, which is intriguing. I should consider atmospheric decay, and losing that evaporated water to space instead of falling back to earth on cool rainy days, so shortsighted. My belief of orbital decay also would suggest I'm wrong, being slowly drawn closer to the sun, I suppose I'm a stubborn sort, until I look like a fool, of which I'm very accomplished at.

Well, I suppose I do indeed speculate a lot, huh.

Of course other earthly disruptions like Super Volcanic episodes, could shorten life for man on earth long before the sun does, or any of the other; nuclear, impact, plate shifting, ocean displacement, and etc. That's why I don't go there, that is pure speculation and IMO, not healthy, and not constructive conversation. Its for fiction writers, and I'm no writer.



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 09:15 PM
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I hit send!? sorry, I think I need a nap.



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 09:30 PM
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reply to post by Aloysius the Gaul
 



Peraonlly I particularly liked the actuarial allowances at the end of the graph.


I thought those were rather hilarious!


(Psssst....no one tell the last living nine....might make them feel the approach of the inevitable....heck, even I feel it!! The impending doom....... LOL!

But, I laugh at the "grim reaper"......in its face (if it had one!)






posted on May, 6 2011 @ 10:04 PM
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Originally posted by Illustronic
Oh yes, it is my own (maybe flawed) assumption that earth would become a 'water world' long before a desert dry rock–the death of man. A layman's logic of heating would support that. It could be very short lived but consider as the water rises, the atmosphere thickens, and that aids to block the increasing solar heating, (no AGW debate here) should internal heat of the earth cool from a reseeding moon, at a faster pace than the sun heating, may even-out, sort of? But you show numbers to suggest I'm wrong, which is intriguing.
Regarding "Water world" Earth, yes and no. Yes models show the possibility the polar ice, glacial ice including the Greenland ice sheet could melt, significantly raising the sea level to the point it would put a large part of the current state of Florida underwater, as well as similar low-lying areas. But it wouldn't be a complete water world:

"What If All the Ice Melts?" Myths and Realities


If all the icecaps in the world were to melt, sea level would rise about 60-75 meters (200-250 feet)
My house is at about 125 meters above sea level. So if sea level rises 75 meters, worst case scenario, my house will still be 50 meters above sea level.

And I wouldn't be surprised if the cycles of ice ages continue over the next few hundred million years (unless man figures out a way to stop it, but it might be beyond his ability), with vast ice sheets alternately freezing and melting as has happened in the past. But none of these will stop the average trendline from being affected by the increase in the sun's output. These are very complicated models though and I'm not 100% sure any of them are right. As the Earth vents hydrogen into space at an increasing rate, the lower pressure may serve to moderate temperature, and that effect may be far more significant than the reduction of the receding moon's tug on the Earth's tides. But if you happen to find anything about how significant the effect of the receding moon is, I'd be interested in seeing it. I'm sure it will have an effect, but I'm just not sure if it will be a large enough change to offset the other effects.



posted on May, 7 2011 @ 06:05 AM
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I count the moon as another world. Meaning a globe, in space, other than earth.



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