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SCI/TECH: Alaskan Volcano Awakening to a Possible Eruption.

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posted on Jul, 30 2004 @ 04:52 PM
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Mount Spurr, an 11,070 foot volcano situated 80 miles west of Anchorage, Alaska, is once more awakening. The temblors began back in February and now it is rumbling with 15 to 20 earthquakes a day.
According to Jackie Caplan-Auerbach, a seismologist, this could very well be a precursor to a new eruption of the volcano. Its last eruption was 12 years ago, in 1992, when it sent ash and smoke up to 65,000 feet in the air disrupting air traffic.
 



Scientists: Volcano awakening from slumber
"When we see an eruption, it commonly will start off this way," said Jackie Caplan-Auerbach, a seismologist at the observatory.

But it is also common for such sequential earthquakes beneath volcanoes to simply tail off, she said.

Seismologists will be looking for other possible signs of an impending eruption, such as gas or steam venting from the crater on the 11,070-foot peak, more frequent earthquakes or shallower earthquakes, which could indicate that magma was moving upward, Caplan-Auerbach said.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.

Mount Spurr has been classified as a "yellow" concern status, which is just one step above green, but there are two more volcanoes in Alaska that have been recently classified as "subjects for elevated concern," as mentioned in the article. Mount Veniaminof has been emitting ash and steam since April of this year, and the Shishaldin Volcano has been emitting ash also.

Related Links

Alaska Volcano Observatory

Alaskan Volcanoes

Volcano News




posted on Jul, 30 2004 @ 06:09 PM
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Well let's see,

I am about 60 miles away from that rock so I can't help but keep an eye on it. However, between the Aleutians and the Alaska Peninsula there are about six other rocks that are bubbling up as well
This one just happens to be close to the few people that are here and prevailing winds will make everything very dirty


TUT TUT



posted on Jul, 30 2004 @ 07:02 PM
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Can someone clarify what type of volcano(s) these are? I'm just curious if it's like the type that explodes like Mt St Helens or are they are like the Hawaiian volcanoes that just spew out lava. The picture in my mind I see is that they are probably like Mt St Helens and will explode one day. Mt St Helens turned the day into night for 3 days in Yakima, Washington and it was nasty. Volcanic dust is like a fine powder when dry and will clog all filters, blow into houses and all over. When the ash is wet, it is a guey mud. It's not fun at all. I would enjoy the view but wouldn't want to be 60 miles downwind from that mess if it explodes.

[edit on 30-7-2004 by orionthehunter]



posted on Jul, 30 2004 @ 07:19 PM
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I am not a geologist but I do not believe that any of the active volcanoes in Alaska are near to where Mt Saint Helen's was when it blew. I was in Cook Inlet in the 80's when Mt. Redoubt blew it's load. First one I ever saw

Very fascinating, looked nuclwww.avo.alaska.edu... and plenty of associated moderate quakes. Virtually halted all air traffic and visibility was like 0. So driving was difficult as well as breathing.
This site will give you a better idea of these Mountains [aka-rocks] are like.

www.avo.alaska.edu...

G'Day,

TUT


E_T

posted on Jul, 31 2004 @ 02:10 AM
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It's stratovolcano. (which have explosive eruptions)
www.avo.alaska.edu...
Some images:
www.avo.alaska.edu...


volcano.und.nodak.edu...


www.volcano.si.edu...
www.volcano.si.edu...


But there's other volcano in area which have had bigger eruption in close past, Katmai/Novarupta



posted on Jul, 31 2004 @ 02:23 AM
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Much ado about nothing,

These things are common place, they happen every now and then. The soot is a pain in the a!s and the quakes wake you up at night. Other than that it is merely an inconvenience due to the freak'in ash. No problem!

TUT



posted on Jul, 31 2004 @ 10:37 AM
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We have such a fine collection of mental ambition here, I felt it necessary to post this want ad here. I encourage all patriots to submit resumes and history of areas of expertise, as there is no possible way of knowing what these guy's are interested in. Might even be baseball cards???

DARPA has been granted Experimental Personnel Hiring Authority for eminent scientists and engineers from outside government service to term appointments with our agency. This authority significantly streamlines and accelerates the hiring process. For additional information regarding this program, and for further employment opportunities at DARPA, please refer to DARPA Human Resources.
www.arpa.mil...

Good Luck,

Tut



posted on Jul, 31 2004 @ 10:40 AM
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We have such a fine collection of mental ambition here, I felt it necessary to post this want ad here. I encourage all patriots to submit resumes and history of areas of expertise, as there is no possible way of knowing what these guy's are interested in. Might even be baseball cards???
????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????
DARPA has been granted Experimental Personnel Hiring Authority for eminent scientists and engineers from outside government service to term appointments with our agency. This authority significantly streamlines and accelerates the hiring process. For additional information regarding this program, and for further employment opportunities at DARPA, please refer to DARPA Human Resources.
www.arpa.mil...

Good Luck,


mhm

posted on Aug, 4 2004 @ 11:18 AM
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Just a little update.



Tuesday, August 3, 2004 2:00 PM ADT

Current Level of Concern Color Code: YELLOW

An overflight of Mount Spurr by AVO scientists yesterday afternoon revealed a circular depression in the icecap just northeast of the summit. The depression is approximately 50 meters (165 feet) in diameter and about 25 meters (82 feet) deep. The floor of the depression contains an icy pond, with small areas of open water. No steam or volcanic emissions were observed. Depressions of this sort may have existed on Spurr before, but AVO is not aware of any in recent decades. The depression may have formed by heat from the volcano melting the ice, or, the release of stored water, which might account for the minor mudflows observed several weeks ago on the upper flanks. If due to heat, it is not known if the flow of heat to the surface has increased and is related to the recent increase in earthquake activity.

There is no evidence or suggestion of any explosive activity; no fresh ash was observed anywhere on the mountain. Crater Peak, the vent responsible for the eruptions in 1953 and in the early 1990s, showed no signof any unusual activity.

Earthquake activity continues beneath Mt. Spurr with no significant change over the past week.



posted on Aug, 4 2004 @ 11:23 AM
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I'm not up on my volcanoin
what does this mean in terms of time? I mean, if they are reporting it, does it mean it "will" soon erupt?



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