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6÷2(1+2)=?

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posted on May, 2 2011 @ 04:54 PM
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Originally posted by MegaMind
No the equation is not changed at all 6/2 (1+2) = 6(1+2)/2 they are equivalent.

In fact these are all equal

6/2(1+2) = 6(1+2)/2 = 6/2 + 12/2 = 6(1/2 + 2/2) = (6 + 12)/2 = 9

NO, they are not equivalent ... nice try though.
6/2(1+2) = 1
whereas each of these do equal 9
6(1+2)/2 = 9
6/2+12/2 = 9
6(1/2+2/2) = 9
(6+12)/2 = 9

you must complete the orders by level ... what you suggest breaks all the rules by applying division over a subset ordered to be multiplied ... that is a no go.




posted on May, 2 2011 @ 04:56 PM
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ERR666: An interpretation error has caused this thread to enter an infinite loop. Do you wish to cancel execution?

------- ------
| YES | | NO |
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posted on May, 2 2011 @ 04:58 PM
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reply to post by morkington
 


ZOMG DIVISION BY ZERO!

Run for it.



posted on May, 2 2011 @ 04:59 PM
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Originally posted by Honor93

Originally posted by MegaMind
No the equation is not changed at all 6/2 (1+2) = 6(1+2)/2 they are equivalent.

In fact these are all equal

6/2(1+2) = 6(1+2)/2 = 6/2 + 12/2 = 6(1/2 + 2/2) = (6 + 12)/2 = 9

NO, they are not equivalent ... nice try though.
6/2(1+2) = 1
whereas each of these do equal 9
6(1+2)/2 = 9
6/2+12/2 = 9
6(1/2+2/2) = 9
(6+12)/2 = 9

you must complete the orders by level ... what you suggest breaks all the rules by applying division over a subset ordered to be multiplied ... that is a no go.


Then go tell these people www.mathgoodies.com...
that their rules are no good you know better.


Rule 1: First perform any calculations inside parentheses.
Rule 2: Next perform all multiplications and divisions, working from left to right.
Rule 3: Lastly, perform all additions and subtractions, working from left to right.


There is no "level" or "subset". You are simply lost .... God I hope you don't work in education - esp MATH.
edit on 2-5-2011 by MegaMind because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2011 @ 05:00 PM
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Originally posted by MegaMind

Originally posted by IamBoon
reply to post by MegaMind
 


YOu cannot get rid of y!!!!!!! It doesn't disappear. No matter what y is the equation will ALWAYS be equivalent to 3*y! or 3y!


Go back to your school and demand a refund!

15 * y
--------- = 3
5 * y

"y"s cancel
edit on 2-5-2011 by MegaMind because: (no reason given)

edit on 2-5-2011 by MegaMind because: (no reason given)


There will be a different result in the equation if the equation is: 15*y / 5*y
and 15y / 5y.

The first one would = 3 y^2

The second one would = 3



posted on May, 2 2011 @ 05:01 PM
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reply to post by spy66
 


Agree completely. GOD a sane person!!


and just so there is no ambiguity

(15 * y) / (5 * y) = 3

and

15 * y / 5 * y = 3y^2
edit on 2-5-2011 by MegaMind because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2011 @ 05:08 PM
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Originally posted by MegaMind
and when ever you see 3 (Y + 1) it is really 3 * (Y + 1) or 3 * Y + 3

stick to those rules and there will never be a problem interpreting.



almost there good buddy ... i was with ya all the way up to ...

and when ever you see 3 (Y + 1) it is really 3 * (Y + 1) or 3 * Y + 3

this is where you lose yourself ...
since 3Y+3 is correct, why don't you get (2+4)=6 from the equation posted? 2(y+2) which is 2Y+4 and since we already know Y=1, 2Y=2+4 which = 6 divided by 6 = 1



posted on May, 2 2011 @ 05:13 PM
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reply to post by Honor93
 


Look last time .... read real close ...

2 (1 + 2) = 6 is indeed true, however

the equation is not 2 (1 + 2) is it? It is ....

6 / 2 (1 + 2)

you follow the rules I posted above and get 9. Make up whatever rule you want and get 1. That is why there are rules.

capiche?

to assist you, again here is the rule

Rule 1: First perform any calculations inside parentheses.
Rule 2: Next perform all multiplications and divisions, working from left to right.
Rule 3: Lastly, perform all additions and subtractions, working from left to right.


edit on 2-5-2011 by MegaMind because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2011 @ 05:17 PM
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Originally posted by MegaMind

Originally posted by Honor93

Originally posted by grey580
For example: 6÷2×3 = 9, not 1. 6-2+3 = 7, not 1.

the sum of the addition within the parenthesis is "ordered" by a multiplier -2 (higher level) and must be performed UPON the sum before division can be properly or sequentially applied.


Simply not true. No such thing. Convention must be accepted. Here is the convention.

www.mathgoodies.com...


Rule 1: First perform any calculations inside parentheses.
Rule 2: Next perform all multiplications and divisions, working from left to right.
Rule 3: Lastly, perform all additions and subtractions, working from left to right.


Like I said 6 * (1/2) * (1+2) = 9

rule 1: 6 / 2 (3)
rule 2: 3 * 3



edit on 2-5-2011 by MegaMind because: (no reason given)

if you are working this problem based on a left to right paradigm, it is no wonder you are incorrect.
you must work this problem from the inside out, then left to right
what you are doing is working inside, then outside from the left ... end of story ... and that leads to a false ending.
when you work from the inside 2(1+2), you MUST include the full expression which is 2 times the sum of the inside ... period.
see pages 5-10 of this thread for more relevant links ... mathgoodies is useful if you attend elementary school but that's about it.



posted on May, 2 2011 @ 05:19 PM
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reply to post by Honor93
 


I see that in addition to math you have a reading comprehension problem. I'm not getting paid to tutor here. Can or did you even read those rules? Do you know what they say and how to apply them to 6 / 2 (1 + 2)?
edit on 2-5-2011 by MegaMind because: (no reason given)





mathgoodies is useful if you attend elementary school but that's about it.


yeah its pretty basic hard to believe you don't get it.
edit on 2-5-2011 by MegaMind because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2011 @ 05:22 PM
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Originally posted by MegaMind
reply to post by Honor93
 


A (B + C) = AB + AC

1 / 3 (B + C) = (1/3)B + (1/3)C

is that clear? what don't u get? A = 1/3, or 6/2 or whatever the hell else you want it to be.

edit on 2-5-2011 by MegaMind because: (no reason given)

don't be swearing and sniping at me because you don't understand.
obviously it is not clear to you or you would arrive at the correct answer.

1 divided by 3 times b+c does NOT equal one-third of b+ one-third of c
6/2 is a division order not a stand alone fraction. you follow orders and simplify fractions.
IF you follow orders, you divide the sum of ... not reduce/simplify and process to the right.



posted on May, 2 2011 @ 05:24 PM
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Originally posted by MegaMind

Originally posted by Honor93
in this equation, a=6 b=2(c) and c=(1+2)
try that and see if you get 9


This statement you made above about the equation A (B+C) = AB + AC and 6 / 2 (1 + 2) clearly shows you do not have even a basic grasp of algebra.
edit on 2-5-2011 by MegaMind because: (no reason given)

edit on 2-5-2011 by MegaMind because: (no reason given)

hmmmm, graduate w/honors 198? something ... naaaah, no clue about algebra.

That you would interpret a division order as a stand alone fraction indicates you haven't graduated 6th grade yet ... good luck with that.



posted on May, 2 2011 @ 05:25 PM
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reply to post by Honor93
 


Like I said to the other guy - Go back to your school and demand a refund. You haven't got the first clue about algebra. I'm out and this time for good



posted on May, 2 2011 @ 05:29 PM
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Originally posted by MegaMind
A (B + C) = AB + AC

according to your substitution from above the eq yields.

6 (2 * (1+2) + (1+2)) This is just garbage.

the correct substitutions for the equation are

A = 6/2 (a fraction get over it)
B = 1
C = 2

6 / 2 (1 + 2)



posted on May, 2 2011 @ 05:39 PM
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Originally posted by MegaMind
If standard notation applies this would generally be interpreted as (15 * y) / (5 * y) = 3

actually, this clarifies your ignorance for me, thanks.
only in an instruction manual will you see such nonsense ... in the adult/real world, it's written 15y/5y=x, solve for x.
which cycles right back to 2(1+2) = 6 which is then divided by A (or 6) resulting in the answer yet again of "1"



posted on May, 2 2011 @ 05:58 PM
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Originally posted by Honor93

Originally posted by MegaMind
If standard notation applies this would generally be interpreted as (15 * y) / (5 * y) = 3

actually, this clarifies your ignorance for me, thanks.
only in an instruction manual will you see such nonsense ... in the adult/real world, it's written 15y/5y=x, solve for x.
which cycles right back to 2(1+2) = 6 which is then divided by A (or 6) resulting in the answer yet again of "1"


In my world the answer to the equation; 15y/5y= x would be

x = 3

You solve the equation 6/2(1+2) wrong because you don't read the equation properly.

You take 2 and multiply this with 1 + 2. But that is wrong, because that is not what the equation is saying.

The equation is saying: Divide 6 by 2 and then multiply it with the result of 1 + 2.

What do you get if you do it properly?

9 right?






edit on 27.06.08 by spy66 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2011 @ 06:06 PM
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Originally posted by MegaMind

Originally posted by Honor93

Originally posted by MegaMind
No the equation is not changed at all 6/2 (1+2) = 6(1+2)/2 they are equivalent.

In fact these are all equal

6/2(1+2) = 6(1+2)/2 = 6/2 + 12/2 = 6(1/2 + 2/2) = (6 + 12)/2 = 9

NO, they are not equivalent ... nice try though.
6/2(1+2) = 1
whereas each of these do equal 9
6(1+2)/2 = 9
6/2+12/2 = 9
6(1/2+2/2) = 9
(6+12)/2 = 9

you must complete the orders by level ... what you suggest breaks all the rules by applying division over a subset ordered to be multiplied ... that is a no go.


Then go tell these people www.mathgoodies.com...
that their rules are no good you know better.


Rule 1: First perform any calculations inside parentheses.
Rule 2: Next perform all multiplications and divisions, working from left to right.
Rule 3: Lastly, perform all additions and subtractions, working from left to right.


There is no "level" or "subset". You are simply lost .... God I hope you don't work in education - esp MATH.
edit on 2-5-2011 by MegaMind because: (no reason given)

no, i won't "go tell these people" because those rules are written for and apply to linear equations ... perhaps when you learn the difference, then you'll find better resources that provide a COMPLETE answer not just the pieces and parts that make you happy.

try this link on for size: oakroadsystems.com...

Every student learns “the” distributive law at an early age:

Right 3(x + 7) = 3(x) + 3(7).

In fact there are many distributive laws, for instance

Right (3x)² = 3² x²

Unfortunately, many students also learn all sorts of other distributions that are invalid, like “expanding”

(x − 6)² = x² − 6² WRONG!

Bad habits like that one seem to stick to students like, like, ... well, like unwanted sticky things.

A simple rule can help you remember how you can combine operations and how you cannot — which distributions are legal and which are illegal.

The Solution

Think of a small house. It’s got a basement, a ground floor, and an attic. You can’t jump right from the basement to the attic, can you? But you can take stairs between the basement and ground floor, or between the ground floor and the attic.

You combine operations just like that. If the operations are on adjacent levels, you can combine them; otherwise you can’t. What are the levels? Forget PEMDAS; there are really only three operations to be concerned with:

house floors ~~ operations
attic ~~ powers and roots
ground floor ~~ multiply and divide
basement ~~ add and subtract

And the rule is very simple:

You can distribute any operation over an operation one level below it. There are no other distributions.


No fear dear, my patience for dealing with students such as yourself wore out many years ago ... i tutor those who WANT help, not force feed those who think they know better.



posted on May, 2 2011 @ 06:13 PM
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Originally posted by MegaMind
reply to post by Honor93
 


I see that in addition to math you have a reading comprehension problem. I'm not getting paid to tutor here. Can or did you even read those rules? Do you know what they say and how to apply them to 6 / 2 (1 + 2)?
edit on 2-5-2011 by MegaMind because: (no reason given)





mathgoodies is useful if you attend elementary school but that's about it.


yeah its pretty basic hard to believe you don't get it.
edit on 2-5-2011 by MegaMind because: (no reason given)

yes i sure did and yes i sure do so here's your freebie for the day ...
this expression is not a stand alone division problem, no matter which rule you apply.
since you insist on using the 'fraction' concept then remember the numerator is 6, the denominator is 2(1+2) ... once you solve the denominator (hence 6), then you proceed to the division of the numerator, also 6 and dividing 6 by 6 will ALWAYS = 1



posted on May, 2 2011 @ 06:16 PM
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Originally posted by MegaMind
reply to post by Honor93
 


Like I said to the other guy - Go back to your school and demand a refund. You haven't got the first clue about algebra. I'm out and this time for good

hahahahahaha, aren't u a funny guy ... too bad, so sad, the school i attended is no longer standing ... guess i'm out a refund too, awe schucks. guess it's a good thing i do get paid to tutor, huh?



posted on May, 2 2011 @ 06:20 PM
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Originally posted by Honor93

try this link on for size: oakroadsystems.com...

Every student learns “the” distributive law at an early age:

Right 3(x + 7) = 3(x) + 3(7).



No fear dear, my patience for dealing with students such as yourself wore out many years ago ... i tutor those who WANT help, not force feed those who think they know better.


God, I said I wouldn't come back but the ignorance here is astounding!

A (B + C) = AB + AC, just as above in the link you provided!

you do realize that A, B and C can be any number and that equation will hold true. Any number!

A can be a fraction 6/2 , B can be 1 and C can be 2

thus,

6 /2 (1 + 2) = (6/2)1 + (6/2)2 = 9

how shocking!!!



PLEASE for the love of GOD and all that is true DO NOT tutor anyone!
edit on 2-5-2011 by MegaMind because: (no reason given)

edit on 2-5-2011 by MegaMind because: (no reason given)



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