It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Tycho's Supernova Remnant

page: 1
4

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 1 2011 @ 11:16 AM
link   
This is the image of the at the APOD website, which is the "Astronomy Picture of the Day"
It usually comes with a brief explanation of what the image is but in this case, it only came with a poem.


Tycho! Tycho! burning bright In the darkness of the night, What exploding white dwarf star Did frame thy remnant from afar, In the distant deep dark skies Under gaze of human eyes? Seen by mortals and their ma Named for one called Tycho Brahe.


Very strange in my opinion.

APOD



edit on 1-5-2011 by TriForce because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 1 2011 @ 11:34 AM
link   
AWESOME!



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 11:36 AM
link   




Amazing photo, thank you for sharing. Heres some info on the man Tycho:
en.wikipedia.org...



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 11:43 AM
link   
nvm
edit on 1-5-2011 by TriForce because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 11:46 AM
link   
Ok, nvm.. i did find this..


Tycho's Supernova Remnant: A supernova remnant in the Milky Way about 13,000 light years from Earth. (Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Rutgers/K.Eriksen et al.; Optical: DSS) Caption: A long Chandra observation of Tycho has revealed a pattern of X-ray “stripes” never seen before in a supernova remnant. The stripes are seen in the high-energy X-rays (blue) that also show the blast wave, a shell of extremely energetic electrons. Low-energy X- rays (red) show expanding debris from the supernova explosion. The stripes, seen to the lower right of this composite image that includes optical data from the Digitized Sky Survey, may provide the first direct evidence that a cosmic event can accelerate particles to energies a hundred times higher than achieved by the most powerful particle accelerator on Earth. Scale: Image is 19 arcmin across (about 55 light years)


Chandra



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 11:48 AM
link   

Originally posted by TriForce
Ok, nvm.. i did find this..


Tycho's Supernova Remnant: A supernova remnant in the Milky Way about 13,000 light years from Earth. (Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Rutgers/K.Eriksen et al.; Optical: DSS) Caption: A long Chandra observation of Tycho has revealed a pattern of X-ray “stripes” never seen before in a supernova remnant. The stripes are seen in the high-energy X-rays (blue) that also show the blast wave, a shell of extremely energetic electrons. Low-energy X- rays (red) show expanding debris from the supernova explosion. The stripes, seen to the lower right of this composite image that includes optical data from the Digitized Sky Survey, may provide the first direct evidence that a cosmic event can accelerate particles to energies a hundred times higher than achieved by the most powerful particle accelerator on Earth. Scale: Image is 19 arcmin across (about 55 light years)


Chandra


Thanks for the addition. The description there helped me understand the picture more. Blast wave...how epic is that lol



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 05:37 PM
link   
Almost makes me think of what the big bang might have looked like.

Peace...



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 06:01 PM
link   
Great pic and even better avy



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 06:22 PM
link   
A shock wave is comming. be prepared. No wonder you cannot see it comming. Do you know any info on this? i'm still gathering info.



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 07:50 PM
link   
Here is an image of it from the same website but posted 2 years ago. That time they did provide an explanation.

APOD


Explanation: What star created this huge puffball? Pictured above is the best multi-wavelength image yet of Tycho's supernova remnant, the result of a stellar explosion first recorded over 400 years ago by the famous astronomer Tycho Brahe. The above image is a composite of an X-ray image taken by the orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory, an infrared image taken by the orbiting Spitzer Space Telescope, and an optical image taken by the 3.5-meter Calar Alto telescope located in southern Spain. The expanding gas cloud is extremely hot, while slightly different expansion speeds have given the cloud a puffy appearance. Although the star that created SN 1572, is likely completely gone, a star dubbed Tycho G, too dim to be easily discerned here, is being studied as the possible companion. Finding progenitor remnants of Tycho's supernova is particularly important because the supernova was recently determined to be of Type Ia. The peak brightness of Type Ia supernovas is thought to be well understood, making them quite valuable in calibrating how our universe dims distant objects.






new topics

top topics



 
4

log in

join